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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


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Paris, Monday, September 19, 1994 


No. 34.69’ 


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Sweden to Swing Back 
To Socialist Leader ship 
As Conservatives Fail 


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By Fred Baxbash 

Washington Pail Service 

STOCKHOLM — Swedish voters 
ended their brief romance with a non- 
Socialist govenunexit Sunday, booting a 
three-year-old conservative coalition 
from office. 

Prime Minister Carl Bildi conceded 
defeat in the election, which will restore 
the Social Democrats to dominance. 

“The responsibility for the govern- 
ment goes to Ingvar Garisson,“ Mr. Bildt 

told supporters. 

Mr. Carlsson's party was leading in 
preliminary results, with nearly 46 per- 
cent of the vote counted, Swedish televi- 
sion reported. 

“Chances of forming a majority gov- 
ernment are not too good,” said Mr. 
Carisson, who was prime minis ter from 
1986 to 1991. 

The center-right coalition look40.8 
percent of the voles in 396 of the 711 
districts counted. 

The Social Democrats will have the 
support of the former Co mmunis ts, who 
woe won 6.1 percent of the vote, and the 
Greens, who had 52 percent. Put togeth- 
er, the parties win have a 56.8 percent 
majority in Parliament if the trend con- 
tinues. 

Though Mr. Carisson is from the party 
that created Sweden's welfare state, no 
one expects a glorious restoration. Heavy 
spending cuts will still be necessary to 
keep the indebted government afloat and 
restore the shattered confidence of busi- 
ness and the markets. . 

The defeat of Mr. Bfldt’s coalition was 
no surprise. Mr. Bildt inherited the be- 
ginnings of the downturn and had been, 
in fact, elected partly because of it, in 
1991. But then the situation got worse 
than many had expected. 

Ultimately, unemployment tripled to 
14 percent, government indebtedness 
reached 90 percent of the gross national 
product, ana the krona took a huge hit 
on the money markets. 

The government began tinkering with 
the cornucopia of health, welfare, hous- 
ing, pension and family support benefits 


that provide income for fully 60 percent 
of the country’s voters. 

In the campaign. Mr. Bildt argued, 
accurately, that the economy was im- 
proving. But opinion polls showed that 
Swedes longed for a return to what they 
perceived as “a lost paradise.” in the 
words of a pollster, to the prosperity and 
security they had enjoyed for genera- 
tions. 

Surveys and interviews at polling sta- 
tions suggested that while most did not 
blame Mr. Bildt for the economic trou- 
bles, they remained deeply worried 
about the way he was t rimmin g benefits 
and about promised “structural re- 
forms.” 

Mr. Bildt talked and acted like a busi- 
nessman and won many supporters in 
Sweden’s corporate community and 
among its growing entrepreneurial class. 
At one point, he declared that the long- 
admired 1 "Swedish model” of govern- 
ment belonged on the "‘scrap heap of 
history.” 

But this did not sit well with many 
Swedes, especially coming from a boy- 
ish-looking 45-year-old perceived by 
many as too glib and loo smart for his 
own good. 

“He’s a smart guy,” said Anneca 
Queckfeldt, 26, after she cast her ballot 
against Mr. Bildt at a precinct just north 
of central Stockholm. And he took office 
“at a moment when the economy was 
going down.” she said. “But I care very 
much about hospitals and schools and all 
the people who have needs.” The Social 
Democrats, she said, “will support the 
welfare that we have here. 2 want to keep 
it the way that we have it." 

“I voted for the Social Democrats.” 
said Ah’nd Rlmalmqwist. 64, a retired 
domestic worker. “I'm the working 
class.” 

Mrs. Rlmalmqwist. like many others, 
said she did not blame the economic 
situation on the Bildt government. “It's 
not very easy to be in a position of doing 
something. It's the times,” she said. Cuts 
“have to come," she said, "but it's a pity 

See SWEDEN, Page 5 


Carter, Extending Talks in Haiti, 
Warns Military Chiefs of Danger 

Despite Delay, U.S. Force Ready to Move 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

WASHINGTON — Pentagon officials 
insisted Sunday that the combat readiness 
of the invasion force steaming off Haiti 
would not be affected by the delay caused 
by last-minute negotiations being conduct- 
ed by former President Jimmy Carter. 

“Our men and women are fully prepared 
to execute the commission the president 
has given them.” General John M. Shall - 
kashvili. chairman of the Joint Chiefs of 
Staff, said in a television interview. 

Asked whether there was any time limit 
on how long U.S. forces could' stay at the 
ready. General Shalikashvili replied. “I 
don’t think there is any specific window.” 
He added, “I don’t think it's an issue now’ 
of how long they can stay poised.” 

Defense Secretary Williams J. Perry also 
said the troops were ready for the invasion. 
He visited the Wasp, one of the assault 
ships in the task force, over the weekend. 


"I can say with very great clarity that we 
are ready, we are ready with overwhelming 
force,” Mr. Perry said. “Even if we have an 
agreement, we are going in with a military 
force capable of defending itself.” 

Even if the Carter mission succeeds, 
U.S. officials said, troops will land anyway 
to revamp Lhe army, train a new civilian 
police force and smooth the way for the 
restoration or the government of President 
Jean-Bertrand Aristide, who was over- 
thrown in 1991. 

General Shalikashvili said that the U.S. 
troops were preparing for “hit-and-run” 
attacks by Haitians tfiai could cause U.S. 
casualties. “In any operation of this size we 
have to be prepared for casualties,” he 
said, adding: “We have been preparing for 
it.” 

General Shalikashvili said the Defense 
Department had structured an “over- 


whelming force which by its very nature 
will mi nimise those risks.” 

He said the rules of engagement allowed 
U.S. troops to defend themselves if they 
were attacked by mobs or armed people. 

General Shalikashvili also said the pri- 
mary mission of the .American troops 
would be to remove the military-controlled 
government, not to launch a search for the 
country's military leader. Lieutenant Gen- 
eral Raoul Cedr’as, or other military fig- 
ures. 

“We are not in the business of manhunts 
against any specific individual.” General 
Shalikashvili said. 

The officials spoke as a fleet of about 20 
U.S. warships, including two aircraft carri- 
ers and 6,000 troops, sailed off Haiti await- 
ing orders from President Bill Clinton to 
move. Military officials have said that up 

See FORCE, Page 5 


Financial Roller Coaster 
Set for One More Plunge 


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By Carl Gewirtz 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — The good news is that the 
roller-coaster ride in prices of financial 
assets may be ending. The bad news is 
there is likely to be one stomach-churning 
drop before it's over. 

What makes the spill exciting is the 
uncertainty about what will set it off. Ana- 
lysts have cited the possibilities: 

• Another half-point increase in U.S. 
interest rates. 

■ U.S. imposition of trade sanctions 
against Japan if bilateral talks fail by the 
Sept. 30 deadline. 

• • Political upsets in Germany and the 
"United States. 

The German state election in Bavaria on 
Sept. 25 is expected to signal bow Chancel- 
lor Helmut Kohl and his coalition partners 
will fare in the Oct. 16 federal election. 
Fear of an upset is already evident in the 
foreign exchange market. 

In the United States, the Democrats are 
expected to perform poorly in the Nov. 8 
congressional election, but a loss of control 
of both houses of Congress would threaten 
stalemate in the find two years of Bill 
Clinton's presidency. 

Any doubt about whether the Federal 
Reserve Board needs to tighten policy ap- 
peared to dissolve Friday after the report 
that capacity use in manufacturing rose to 
84.7 percent last month, the highest since 
April 1989. A reading of 85 percent is 


regarded as the threshold where produc- 
tion bottlenecks emerge, enabling manu- 
facturers and retailers to raise prices. 

A higher-than-expected 0.7 percent in- 
crease in August industrial production set- 
tied the debate about whether the accumu- 
lation of inventories in the second quarter 
was a sign of an impending slowdown. 

For J. P. Morgan analysts, the data con- 
firm that “inventory accumulation was ei- 
ther concentrated in imports or voluntary, 
as weaker output would have been evident 
by now if the stockbuilding had been in- 
voluntary.” 

Prices of U.S. stocks and bonds fell 
sharply on Friday’s news, dragging down 
European markets that were still open. 

The only question is how soon the Fed- 
eral Reserve Board will act. The next poli- 
cy meeting is Sept. 27. It could lift the 
benchmark cost of overnight money, now 
4.75 percent, by a quarter point ana await 
the Oct. 7 report on September employ- 
ment before adding another quarter. It 
also could go for the full half-point in- 
crease in September, or wail until its Nov. 
15 meeting. 

The waiting will be pernicious for the 
bond and equities market. In turn, that will 
keep the dollar under pressure. Financial 
markets in Europe also will suffer. 

“Stay defensive on all bond and stock 
markets," said Christopher Pons at Ban- 

See DOLLAR, Page 13 



Jim atKOvRcumv 

Former President Carter in Port-au-Prince on Sunday, accompanied by General Powell, at rear, and Senator Nunn. 


Their Families 
And the Army 
Are at Risk, 
U.S. Team Says 


By Douglas Farah 

Il'iiiAinvicn real Sente* 

PORT-AU-PRINCE. Haiti — A US. 
delegation led by former President Jimmy 
Carter warned senior Haitian military 
leaders Sunday that their families could be 
hurt and the army destroyed if the officers 
continue to cling to power, according to 
sources briefed by the American delega- 
tion. 

The delegation, which included the 
chairman of the Senate Armed Services 
Committee, Sam Nunn, Democrat of 
Georgia, and retired General Colin L. 
Powell, former chairman of the Joint 
Chiefs of Staff, was authorized by Presi- 
dent Bill Clinton as a last-ditch effort to 
avoid a U.S. invasion of the nation. The 
delegation, which arrived Saturday at 
noon, had been scheduled to stay only 24 
hours. 

But the meetings were unexpectedly ex- 
tended by several hours in the hopes of 
averting bloodshed. U.S. officials said the 
talks were “serious” but would not divulge 
any details. The Carter delegation was to 
return to Washington after the delay to 
brief President Clinton on the negotia- 
tions. 

[In Washington, the White House chief 
of staff, Leon E. Panetta. and the current 
chairman of the Joint Chiefs, General John 
M. Shalikashvili, stressed that Mr. Carter's 
mission was confined to discussions of the 
removal from power of Lieutenant Gener- 
al Raoul Cedros and other Haitian military 
leaders and that there would be no change 
in the timetable for invasion of the Carib- 
bean country. 

(“We are on a very s-pecific timetable.” 
Genera] Shalikashvili said, according to 
news agencies. “They have to leave now. 
We are not changing our timetable.” 

[Secrelaiy of Slate Warren M. Christo- 
pher also said lhat there had been no 
softening of the U.S. position. Mr. Chris- 
topher said President Clinton remained 
“absolutely firm” on his demand lhat the 
Haitian generals step down and leave the 
country immediately. *T don't see any wig- 
gle room on the principle lhat these people 
must surrender power,” he said.] 

The United States and the United Na- 
tions are insisting lhat General Cedras; the 
army chief of staff. Brigadier General Phi- 
lippe Biamby; and the Port-au-Prince po- 
lice chief, Michel Francis, step down. A 
UN resolution backed by the United 
Slates says that General Cedras must retire 

See HATH, Page 5 


A Liberation Legacy: South Africa’s Witch Murders 


By Bill Keller 

Near York Times Service 

NOBODY, South Africa —On the Sun- 
day in April when South Africa was count- 
ing the votes of its first free elections, 
residents of this town with the self-effacing 
name accosted Sinna Mankwane in front 
of hex home and pinioned her arms with 
three gasoline-splashed tires. 

According to witnesses' accounts, the 
mob summoned her husband, Johannes, 
from the house and handed him a box of 
matches. With the couple's son and daugh- 
ter looking on, Johannes was forced to 
burn his wife alive. 

After watching her die in agony, the 
neighbors dispersed, but the next Tuesday 


they were back. They doused her husband 
with gasoline and set him aflame inside his 
house. They stoned and tortured the 21- 
year-old daughter, Martha, before inciner- 
ating her, and then hunted down the 17- 
y ear-old son, Frank, and finished him off. 

The Mankwanes were not victims of a 
political feud or ethnic hate. They were 
accused of having cast a lethal spell on a 
neighbor. 

In this season of South Africa's rebirth, 
the rural villages of the dry northeast have 
been seized by a passion for witch burning 
unlike anything seen here before. 

The mood appears to be very much a by- 
product of South Africa's liberation. For 
the surprising thing about these killings is 
that in most cases the mobs are led not by 


tribal elders upholding ancient tradition 
but by young militants — “comrades," in 
the South African vernacular — steeped in 
vigilante passions by the struggle against 
white rule. 

The police say they know of 73 people 
who have been put to death as witches this 
year in one area alone, the former apart- 
heid reservation called Lebowa, created as 
a “homeland" for 2.7 million Northern 
Sotho people. The total number killed is 
believed to be much larger. 

Leaders of the African National Con- 
gress, tribal elders and the police see the 
killings as a symptom of the breakdown of 
authority and the cheapening of life that 
hardened a generation raised on defiance. 


“Our young people realized that in 
changing things in this country they would 
use whatever means they have at their 
disposal,’’ said Mokopane Matsaung, 38, 
the chairman of the civic association in 
Nobody, a town of several thousand peo- 
ple n a m ed for the emptiness blacks found 
when they were first removed to the site in 
the 1 960s. The civic association is affiliated 
with the African National Congress. 

Even the rituals of modern witch killing 
come not from tradition but from the 
struggle. The burning is often preceded by 
a chanting toyi-toyi, the war dance of polit- 
ical protest, and is carried out warn the 
ae-filled tire — the “necklace” — 

See WITCH, Page 5 






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Stop Sarajevo Battle, 

UN General Warns 

SARAJEVO (Combined Dispatches) 
— lieutenant General Michael Rose, the 
UN commander in Bosnia,, warned the 
Bosnian Army and Serbian forces on 
Sunday to stop fighting around Sarajevo, 
the Bosnian capital immediately or face 
NATO air strikes. 

Meanwhile, in northeast Bosnia, Serbs 
expelled 1,700 Muslims in a wave of “eth- 
nic cleansing," with refugees fleeing to 
Tuzla, UN officials said. (AFP, Reuters) 


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Books 

Bridge 

Page 4. 
Page 4. 




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FdBm DcfltirMgciiGc FnaatF 

Sarajevans waiting Sunday for water from a pipe spanning the Miljacka, as Serbs kept up a utility blockade. 


Truth About 1947 Crash 
As Strange as UFO Myth 

ries, radar reflectors made of thin metal 
foil. 

At the time, the air force said the wreck- 
age was that of a weather balloon. But over, 
the decades, the incident grew to mythic 
dimensions among flying-saucer culusts. 

The United States, they said, had pos- 
session of alien bodies and of otherworldly 
gear that was incredibly thin and strong. 
The government, they charged, made 
death threats to keep knowledgeable peo- 
ple quiet. It studied extraterrestrial crait w 
learn the secrets of making stealth bomb- 
ers and fiber-optic communications net- 
works. Roswell was the greatest of all gov- 
ernmental cover-ups. 

On Sept. 8, after an eight-month investi- 
gation, the air force issued a thick report 
that to all appearances deflates the con- 
spiracy theory. Of course, ardent flying- 
saucer fans say the cover-up continues. 

“This won't lay it to rest" said Albert C. 
Trakowski, a retired colonel who as an air 
force officer had run Project Mogul “The 
psychology is simple: People believe what 
they want to believe. In New Mexico, fly- 

See MOGUL, Page 3 


By- William J. Broad 

Jffw York Timer Service 

NEW YORK — A mysterious 1947 
crash in the New Mexico desert lhat be- 
came legendary among flying-saucer fans 
and cover-up theorists turns out to have 
involved something nearly as strange as an 
alien spaceship. 

The wreckage, quickly whisked away by 
the U.S. Air Force, was part of an airborne 
system for atomic-age spying that was in- 
vented by a leading geophysicist and de- 
veloped by Columbia University, New 
York University and the Woods Hole 
Oceanographic Institution, according to 
an air force report and persons familiar 
with the once- secret project 

The program. Project Mogul, and its 
goal, set by a postwar United States wary 
of losing its atomic monopoly, was to 
search high in the atmosphere for weak 
reverberations from nuclear-test blasts 
half a world away. 

The debris, found near Roswell, New 
Mexico, was a smashed pan of the pro- 
gram's balloons, sensors and, of most con- 
sequence to the growth of spaceship thee- 




.Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 1994 




Q & A: Two Cheers for Vatican From a Spanish Theologian 


Has the Vatican emerged weakened from its 
high-profile but deeply contested interventions at 
the United Nations population conference in Cai- 
ro and in die former Yugoslavia ? Enrique Miret 
Magdalena, a Spanish theologian and author, 
discussed the issues with Bony James of the 
International Herald Tribune 


Q. How effective was the Vatican’s role at 
Cairo? 

A At first it denied birth control on princi- 
ple, along with abortion, of course. Then, little 
by little, as the documents were modified, it 
ceded ground and somehow, at the end, accept- 
ed birth control. It played a good role in estab- 
lishing that abortion should not be used as a 
method of birth control. 

Q. But it has not given ground on artificial 
contraception. 

A. Responsible paternity has been fully ac- 
cepted by the Catholic Church since Pius XII, 
and particularly since the second Vatican coun- 
cil Where I disagree with the Vatican, and I 
believe most Catholics are with me, is over its 


obsession with methods. The hierarchy makes a 
huge mistake when it starts to say which meth- 
ods are acceptable and which are not I believe 
these distinctions between artificial and nonar- 
tifirial are completely out of date. Without 
artificial developments, in medicine, for exam- 
ple, mankind would not have progressed. 

Q. Do yon accept the criticism that the 
Vatican in a sense hijacked the Cairo confer- 
ence by turning it into a debate on abortion? 


A. It did concentrate excessively on the ques- 

it n< 


Q. Some critics say that Pope John Paul D is 
influenced by the conservative Opus Dei. 
which was founded in Spain and has much of 
its strength there. Do you agree? 

A Yes. The Pope is excessively under the 
influence of the Opus Dei, which has always 
adopted a rigid posture on birth control and 
abortion. The Opus Dei wields great power in 
the Vatican. Its chief spokesman is a member of 
the organization, and it was he who intervened 
most directly in Cairo. 


Wall fell and the Easi opened up, thefirst thing 
that occurred to the Pope — who until that time 
had spoken only of ecumenism — was to name 


Catholic bishops in the Orthodox regions of 
The Orthodox Church asked where was 


Russia. 

the ecumenism if the result meant that the 
Catholic Church came to compete with it 


tion. Abortion is negative, a bad thing. But how 
can you say that it should never be tolerated 
when democratic states allow it by law in ex- 
treme cases, as is the case in Spain where all the 
polls show that people want to keep it? 

Q. By extreme you mean abortion in cases of 
rape, incest or where the mother’s life is at risk? 

A. Yes. If you study the history, particularly 
the 16th century, you will rind there have been 
many Catholic moral theologians who accepted 
abortion in extreme cases, as does our law. The 
church should say that Catholics should not 
resort to abortion, but only as general guid- 
ance. Nothing more. 


Q. Is the Vatican losing its diplomatic touch? 
A The visit to Croatia was certainly undiplo- 
matic. Since it was not considered wise for the 
Pope to go to Sarajevo, he should have avoided 

S to ex-Yugoslavia at all, because everyone 
he favored only one side. We should not 
forget recent history in ex-Yugoslavia. 

It was always said that the Vatican had great 
political intelligence, or diplomatic abilities. 


not 1 


which seem to be failin g at the moment. Con- 
in ex-Yue 


cretely, its actions in ex-Vugoslavia would have 
been unthinkable a few years ago. This is not 
the only case. For example, when the Berlin 


Q. Is the Vatican going to be able to hold 
back rising demands from women for greater 
equality’ in the church, even including the 
priesthood? 

A. No. The presence and demands are gener- 
alized throughout the Catholic world. This is not 
a mere feminist issue, as some people say. It ts 
* tly that women rightly want equality at au 
s, including in the church. The role of wom- 
en is being discussed theologically, and we 
should have the patience to End out where these 
discussions lead. The Pope has tried to cut these 
discussions off, and state that the matter is 
definitely closed. This is m isleadi n g and creates 
confusion, because it is not an ex cathedra, or 
definite, decision of the whole church. 


Germans Go on Terrorist Alert 


Pcdestinian Group Reportedly Targets Jewish Leaders 


By Stephen Kinzer 

New York Tuna Service 

BERLIN — The police are 
on high alert after a report that 
a Palestinian terrorist group is 
planning to attack Jewish lead- 
ers, businesses and community 
centers. 

For more than a week, police 
officers wearing bulletproof 
vests and armed with automatic 
weapons have been conspicu- 
ously standing guard along a 
stretch of the Kunflrstendamm, 
Berlin’s main shopping street, 
where several Je wish-owned 
businesses are located. People 
entering shops and parking lots 
have been subject to random 
identity checks. 

Dozens of officers are also on 
guard in front of die city’s his- 
toric synagogue on Oranien- 
strasse. The synagogue was 
heavily damaged in the 1938 
Nazi rampage known as Crystal 
Night, and it has recently re- 
opened after several years of 
renovation. This weekend the 
block where Berlin's main Jew- 
ish community center is located 
was closed to all traffic. 


A spokesman for the Interior 
Ministry in Brandenburg, the 
state that surrounds Berlin, said 
security had been stepped up at 
Jewish cemeteries and other 
possible targets. The area 
around the Israeli Embassy in 
Bonn has been blocked off. 


A report in the news maga- 
zine Focus said police investi- 
gators in Bonn had "very con- 
crete" evidence that a 'group 
headed by Abu Nidal, a Pales- 
tinian terrorist, was seeking to 
kill Ignatz Bubis, the leader of 
Germany's main Jewish organi- 
zation. 


Mr. Bubis has become promi- 
nent on the German political 
scene. He often makes speeches 
war ning against anti-Semitism 
and other forms of xenophobia, 
and last year admirers promot- 
ed him as a candidate for presi- 
dent of Germany until he an- 
nounced that he would not 
accept the job. 

A spokesman for the federal 
prosecutors, Rolf Hannich, 
confirmed that the police had 
received information about 


possible attacks by the Abu Ni- 
dal group. He said detectives 
had searched several houses in 
Berlin. 

Bond Schmidbauer, a senior 
aide to Chancellor Helmut 
Kohl, said he was not certain 
whether the searches would de- 
ter planned terrorist attacks. 
"We may have been able to pre- 
vent something very bad,” Mr. 
Schmidbauer told the newspa- 
per Bfld am Sonntag. "But that 
does not mean the danger is 
past The government is con- 
tinuing to concern itself inten- 
sively with the protection of Is- 
raeli establishments.” 

The terrorist group led by 
Abu Nidal is said to nave been 
responsible for killing or 
wounding numerous people in 
at least 20 countries. Its actions 
are believed to include the 1982 
shooting of the Israeli ambassa- 
dor in London, Schlomo Argov, 
which touched off Israel's inva- 
sion of Lebanon. The German 
authorities say they believe that 
the group is also responsible for 
a 1985 bomb attack on Frank- 
furt airport in which three died. 


DUTY FREE ADVISORY 


US$1 5,000,000 



Center to Focus on U.S.- Berlin Ties 


New York Tima Service 


USS1 38.000 paid out at each 
draw. USS 15 Million won so 


far. In ihe worid-famous Abu 


Dhabi Duty Free ranie. Each 
ticket priced at US$138. Just 
1,200 tickets entered in each 
draw: Approximately 6 draws 


Abu Dhabi Airport. Notification 
immediately by phone and by 
mail. Money paid in cash, by 
bankers cheque or directly- 


into the winners bank account. 


USS1 5.000.000 hard cash. 


The easy way. 


every month. Available 


exclusively to passengers 
travelling or transiting through 


Abu Dhabi 


Airport Duty Free 


The way the world's going 


BERLIN — A group of 
prominent Americans and Ger- 
mans has announced plans to 
build an American Academy 
here, part of a web of projects 
intended to assure that Bolin’s 
ties to the United Slates do not 
weaken over the years ahead. 

The academy, which is to 
open in 1996, will be a center for 
scholars from the United States, 
Germany and Central Europe. 

To show that the United 
States intends to remain active 


here, U.S. officials have begun 
projects that are envisioned as 
the basis of a new and stronger 
economic, political, cultural 
and strategic relationship. 

"We have got a massive ef- 
fort under way to demonstrate 
to Berlin, to Germany and the 
world that we are not pulling 
out in any real sense,” said 
Richard C Holbrooke, the U.S. 
ambassador to Germany. "All 
that is leaving Berlin are a cou- 
ple of hundred soldiers who are 
no longer needed. 


Berlusconi Coalition Member Britain Urges 

U.S. to Bar Visit 


Derides State TV Appointees official 


The Associated pros 

ROME — A storm of criti- 
cism arose Sunday over new ap- 
pointments at the state televi- 
sion networks, dividing the 
government and showing that 
Italy^s airwaves are still fierce 
political battlegrounds. 

The master took on special 
urgency given the fact that 
Prime Minister Silvio' Berhis- 
confs financial empire, Fmin- 
vest, controls the three main 
private channels, which com- 
pete with the three state chan- 
nels of RAI-TV. 

The uproar was the latest in a 
series at disputes between Mr. 
Berlusconi and his coalition 
ally, the Northern League. The 
feuding has gone on since the 
government’s inception in May 
and has kept it in an almost 
permanent state of controversy. 

The RAI board of directors, 


considered sympathetic to Mr. 
Berlusconi, on Saturday named 
a slate of veteran RAI execu- 
tives and onetime employees of 
Berlusconi-controlled news 
outlets to run the networks, 
their news and sports divisions 
and the state radio. They re- 
place managers appointed un- 
der the previous government. 

The Northern League, an- 
gered that none of its choices 
bad been appointed, threatened 
to block financing for the heavi- 
ly indebted broadcasting com- 
pany. 

The new managers are “all 
morally disqualified people, be- 
cause in reality they are part of 
the old regime,” newspapers 
quoted the Northern League 
leader, Umberto Bossi, as hav- 
ing said. He asserted that Mr. 
Berlusconi now controlled six 
networks. 


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Ask about our special reduction 
for Herald Tribune readers 


Agence France- Prase 

LONDON — The British 
government urged the United 
States on Sunday not to grant 
an entry visa to Gerry Adams, 
the leader of the Irish Republi- 
can Army’s political wing, Sinn 
Fein, saying that the IRA had 
not made clear whether its 
cease-fire was "permanent.” 

A government spokesman 
said that granting a visa to Mr. 
Adams would be unwise "at a 
time that would inflame opin- 
ion in Ulster ” adding that the 
Sinn Fein leader "should be 
asked to clarify whether the 
cease-fire is permanent or not” 

The British government is 
anxious to deny Mr. Adams an- 
other propaganda coup like the 
one he had m February during 
his last U.S. visit, when he was 
interviewed on the major televi- 
sion networks. He had been 
granted a 48-hour visa. 

The Sunday Times reported 
that President Bill Clinton 
would authorize Mr. Adams's 
visit during the coming week 
without requiring the Sinn Fdn 
leader to declare the cease-fire 
permanent It said Prime Minis- 
ter John Major had asked Mr. 
Gin ton in a personal message 
to deny the visa. Mr. Adams is 
barred from the British main- 
land. 


WORLD BRIEFS 


Leotard Faults Mitternuid on Vicky 


PARIS (Reuters) — Defense Minister Fran$ois Ltotard on 
S und ay joined a growing chotus of criticism of President Francois 
Mitterrand's recent discussions of his ties to tire collaborationist 0 
Vichy regime during World War H. 

“Those who say that they didn't know, those who think that it 
was less serious than people thought, they — whether they like it ■ 
or not — are putting themselves on the sameride as the oppfes- 
sors,” Mr. Leotard said on French tdeviaon. 

On Saturday, Interior Minister Charles Pasqua said he was 
saddened by what he saw as Mr. Mitterra nd's attem pt to rewrite 
the history of the era and his portrayal of Wartime France as "a . 
beaten, divided and consenting nation. Mr. Kfitterrand, a Social- 
ist whose second term ends in May, shares power with the 
conservative cabinet that includes Mr. Ltotard sod Mr. Pasqua. 



, Hi 


2 Shiite Factions Battle in Kabul 


KABUL (Reuters) — Shelling and mortar fire boomed across 
the Afghan capital Sunday, and witnesses said jets had struck 
targets m the southwestern sector of the city, where Shiite Muslim 
factions had been battling for five days. 

At least 80 people have been Irilkd and more than 500 wounded 
since the fighting between the Islamic Movement and the Islamic 
Coalition Council began Wednesday, hospital 'sources said. 
Forces loyal to Prcsdeot Btnhanuddmfobbam have fought on 



the side of lslamic Movement Those loyal to Prime 

d General 


Gulbuddin Hekmatyar and the warlord General Abdul Rashid 
Dustam were backing the Islamic Coalition CoundL Details, of 
the fighting woe scant, and there was no independent word cm 
which faction had the upper hand. 


Burundi Parlies Set Election Rules 


BUJUMBURA, Burundi (Reuters) — Pro-government and 
opposition parties have agreed on the method of dotting a new 
president following weeks of talks overahadewed by ethnic vio- 
lence, Burundi radio reported. . . 

Under the agreement, signed by nine p^t^caiKfidatesf or the 
presidency wfllbe registered over the next feir <&p.The 
Assembly, which is dominated by the mRlhea 

select the new head of state from candmates pyt fortfoKt by 
Burundi’s de eply divided parties. ^ ^ _ ^ 

daye, a Hutu, was assasanatet^last Octofrgil^hn atx^^coup 


Juvenal Habyarimana of Rwanda in a rocket . 

April 6. That attack set off the summer’s crisis in Rwand^ which, 
like Burundi, had been ruled for cent u ries by 'the Tutanpriority. 


Majorbon Way to South Africa four 


LONDON (AFP) — Prime Minister John Major left- London 
on Sunday for Saudi Arabia attire start of a three-nation tour that 
wQl take him to South Africa for the first visit these by a British 


prime minister in more than 30 years. 

Jidda with 


He was due for talks in Jidda with King Fahd late Sunday 
before heading for Abu Dhabi on Monday fen: talks whir tire head 
of state. Sheikh Zayed ibn Sultan an Nahayan. 

Mr. Major's delegation, comprising several businessmen and 
sports personalities, will arrive in Cape Town on Tuesday and 
leave South Africa on Thursday. 


Wotfgann Kauay/Rcuicr* 

YROST* — The head of Bavaria’s Social Democrats, Renate Schmidt, quaffing a titer of 
Oktoberfestbeer as the annual German event got roffingin the Bavarian capital, Munich. 


Pakistan Floods Kill More Tkan 300 


ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (Reuters) — ■ Floods caused by he avy 


monsoon rains that began last month have killed more 
people in Pakistan, Information and Broadcasting Minister Kh**; I 
lid Ahmad Kharal Sunday. ' ? 

More than 83,000 bouses have been destroyed, Mr. Kharal said * 

th toll was 



"There’s a real strength and a 
real emotion in the feeling that 
Germans, and especially Berlin- 
ers, have toward the United 
States. Logically, these ties will 
gradually attenuate and be- 
come more distant Memories 
of the airlift and ‘Ich bin ein 
Berliner’ will fade like Gettys- 
burg and the Battle of the 
Bulge. What we are doing now 
is building a series of institu- 
tions that will guarantee that 
this relationship doesn't fade 
along with the memories.” 


after a cabinet meeting. He said the death toll was 333. The floods 
have affected 4,159 villages in all of Pakistan’s four provinces and 


damaged cotton and rice crops. The cabinet approved a grant of 

relief. 


500 million rupees ($1633 million) for food 

For the Record 


ftc 

s* I viii 1 




■--- \ ■■**■** 
• !t in ■■ * 


Wole Soyinka, the Nigerian writer who was awarded the Nobel 
Prize in Literature in 1986; denies being under government 
surveillance, as had been reported, diplomats said. (AFP) 
Heavy rains swept across Japan, bringing relief to drought- 
stricken areas but causing floods in Tokyo where train delays 
stranded more than 30,000 people. (Reuters) 


K..’€S 




TRAVEL UPDATE 


Wi' 1 t 


Hope for ILK. Rail Settlement Rises 


LONDON (Reuters) — r- A 14-week labor dispute that has 
disrupted Britain's railroad network may soon be over, newspa- ; • 
pers reported Sunday. 

Railroad sgoalere have bdd a series of 24- and 48-hour strikes 
every week since June in one of the bitterest industrial conflicts in c 
Britain in the last decade. The next 24-hour strike is scheduled for *■» - 
Friday. > * " 

The Sunday Telegraph and The Independent on Sunday said 
the bead of the signaler’s union, Jimmy Knapp, was seeking v — 
backing from the union executive to negotiate with Railtrack cm 
productivity as well as the signalers' demand for a raise to 


<Si 


compensate for past productivity gains Parallel ne gotiati ons 
ould bridge the gap between tire two sides, the pap 


at Sin 


those issues cot 
said. 

A anew of 28 R uss i an sailors has been placed in quarantine in 
Hamburg after their captain developed symptoms of cholera, a 
healtii official said. The sailors, who had had arrived by bus from 
southern Russia , were being tested. They had been scheduled to 
relieve the crew of a Russian cargo ship in Hamburg. - (AFP) 

UJ3. aviation experts and Vietnamese officxab begin two days of 
talks Monday aimed at establishing direct passenger flights be- 
tween tire two countries. Four U.S. airlines — Delta, United, 
Northwest and Continental — have shown strong interest in 
flying to Vie tnam, (AP) 


A local legislator from Bd has urged the Indonesian govern- 
ment to build a bridge between Java and the resort island because s. ' 
of long ddays at feny loading points, the official Antara news 5 
agency said. (Reuters) J 


This Week’s Holidays 


Banking and government offices will be dosed or services 
the following countries and their dependencies this 


curtailed in 

week because of national and religious holidays: 

MONDAY: Chile, Sri Lanka. 

TUESDAY: Israel, Taiwan. 

WEDNESDAY: Armenia, Belize, Hong Kang. Korea, Macao, Malta. . 
THURSDAY: Wwium, Mali. 

FRIDAY: Japan. 

SATURDAY: Dominican RrpnbEc. 

Sources: J.P. Morgan, Reuters. , 



j, 

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To call from country to country, or to the U.S., dial the WorldPhone® number of the country you're calling from 


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Peru (Outride of Lima, dial 180 ftaL) 001-190 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 1994 





Page 3 


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Vultures or Helpers? Lawyers Canvass Victims’ Families 


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By Benjamin Weiser 

Washing! on Post Service 

NEW YORK — It has become a 
grim ritual played out after most mass 
disasters in the United States — the 
mad dash by lawyers to sign up clients 
— and the USAir crash on SepL 8, 
.which seems to have spawned one of 
the most intense competitions, has en- 
gendered not only bitterness among 
some families but also a debate among 
lawyers. 

“I think the whole thin g is disgust- 
ing,” said Lee KreindJer of New York, 
whose firm has long represented air 
disaster victims and their families. 

“The whole concept of solicitation 
turns my stomach,” he said. “The cli- 
ent usually ends up with the wrong 
lawyer. It’s unprofessional. These 
clowns go around and make lawyers 
appear to be charlatans.” 

Joe Koon Jr., the son of a West 
Virginia man who was one of the 132 
killed in the Pennsylvania crash, said 
he has received four or five calls and 


another four or five letters and pack- 
ages from lawyers seeking to represent 
his family. 

“They’re vultures, that’s basically 
what they are,” he said. “This isn’t a 
used-car kind of deaL" 

He said he was particularly bothered 
by one caller who claimed to be a 
survivor of a 1991 USAir crash who 
tried to make “a big sales pitch for his 
attorney." 

Mr. Koon said he has tried to keep 
the contacts from reaching his mother, 
the victim’s widow. “If my mom had 
taken the phone call," he said “she 
would have gone b allis tic." 

Dennis Dickson of Pennsylvania, 
whose wife died in the crash, said he 
received a call from a man who identi- 
fied himself as an agent for a profes- 
sional football player and tried to rec- 
ommend some lawyers. 

“You’d think he could have waited a 
little longer,” Mr. Dickson said. “He 
didn't have to call me the second day 
of the accident." 


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“Ev«y time there’s a major disas- 
ter,” said Stephen Giliers, a New York 
University law professor who has writ- 
ten extensively on professional ethics, 
“there's a debate about soliciting, 
whether it's Bhophal or Exxon Valdez 
or a plane crash.” 

He said the debate often pits long- 
established, high-profile firms, which 
wait for litigants to come to them, 
against more upstart attorneys who 
push aggressively for cases. 

“The whole thing comes down to 
economics dressed up as ethics.” Mr. 
Giliers said. 

Indeed, since the USAir crash, a 
number of leading aviation lawyers 
retained by families of victims said 
they intentionally did no soliciting but 
waited for referrals from other firms. 

“I don’t feel it’s morally right to 
contact a family in their hour of grief 
to say, ‘Here 1 am, a lawyer,’ ” said 
Gerard Lear, who represented eight 
families in the 1992 crash of a USAir 
jet. He has been referred one case from 


the crash of last week. “You don't 
want to be perceived as an ambulance 
chaser.” 

Stanley Chesley of Cincinnati, who 
was lead counsel in the trial for the 
1992 crash, said he had been retained 
by several families in the most recent 
crash. “The only way we get cases is 
the old-fashioned way: referrals from 
counsel, probate lawyers, corporate 
counsel." 

John Doherty, chief counsel for the 
disciplinary board of the Supreme 
Court of Pennsylvania, said he was 
looking into an allegation that a lawyer 
“supposedly converged upon a church 
where there was a memorial service 
and made a pest of himself and was 
escorted out." 

Mr. Doherty also said be had re- 
ceived a call from a relative of a victim 
who described an attorney’s telephone 
solicitation. 

But other lawyers defend the aggres- 
sive approach. 

One. John P. Coale of Washington, 


said he obtained the passenger list 
from the SepL 8 crash and had already 
telephoned about 30 victims’ families, 
asking whether they would be interest- 
ed in receiving information about his 
firm. Only few refused. 

“It’s hardly disgusting. There’s no 
solicitation," he said, adding. “It’s very 
low-keyed, so there is no pressure." 

Mr. Coale said lawyers who criticize 
his tactics were being “condescending.” 

"There is no way that these passen- 
gers have to Find out who’s experi- 
enced," he said. 

Jon Duncan filed ihe first lawsuit in 
the Sepu 8 crash on behalf of the 
family of the Reverend Joel Thompson 
of Illinois. 

The lawyer said that bis firm, which 
handles the family’s legal matters, does 
“not pretend to be an aviation law 
firm.” It will eventually bring in more 
specialized aviation lawyers, he said. 
But at least his clients will not continue 
to be harassed by other lawyers, he 
said. 


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Away From Politics 



Bnh S(ning/Aj^ncT Francc-Pnsne 

Heather Whitestone, Miss Alabama, left, as it was announced that she had been 
named Miss America. With her was Cullen Johnson, Miss Virginia, first runner-up. 


• A dancer from Alabama who had lost most 
of-herhearing in infancy won the 68th annual 
Miss America Pageant, becoming the first 
contestant with a disability to do so. Heather, 
Whitestone, 21, had won in both the talent 
and swimsuit categories in preliminary com- 
petition. Her platform was, “Youth Motiva- 
tion: Anything Is Posable.” 

• The University of New Hampshire acted 
wrongly when it suspended a professor for 
sexual harassment after seven female students 
com plained about comments he had made 1 
during a writing class, a judge has ruled. A 
US. District Court judge in Concord, New 
Hampshire, ordered the university to rein- 
state the professor, J. Donald Silva, who was 
suspended in 1992. 

• The six astronauts aboard the shuttle Dis- 
covery spent an extra day in space studying 
the effects of shuttle exhaust while a $25 


million laser showered Earth with flashes of 
green lighL The mission had been scheduled 
to end Sunday, but the astronauts conserved 
enough power for a 10th day. Landing was set 
for Monday. 

• A woman has been sentenced to death in Los 
Angeles for hiring a hit man to kill her hus- 
band then arranging to have the hit man 
killed. Mary Ellen Samuels. 47. was convicted 
on July 1 on two counts of murder. 

• A U.S. Air Force A-10 attack jet crashed 
during a training exercise at Fort Irwin, Cali- 
fornia,’ killing the pilot, who was the only 
person aboard. 

• The house where Margaret Mitchell wrote 
most of “Gone With The Wind" was gutted 
by fire. The novelist lived in the Atlanta 
building in a first-floor apartment with her 
husband from 1926 to 1932. She referred to 
the house as “The Dump." 


Harriman’s Heirs Sue Widow 

Ambassador Cited in Disputed Trust Fund Investments 


By Jan Hoffman 

New York Tuna Service 

NEW YORK — A long-sim- 
mering family feud among the 
heirs of W. Averell Harrimar 
has erupted in federal court. 

Trustees for the daughters, 
grandchildren and great-grand- 
children of the late New York 
governor and U.S. diplomat 
sued his widow, Pamela Ham- 
man. now the U.S. ambassador 
to France. They contend that 
she squandered more than $30 
milli on from their trust funds 
on high-risk investments, in- 
cluding an ill-fated resort. 

Also named in the suit, made 
public Friday in federal court in 
Manhattan, were Clark M. Clif- 
ford and Paul C. Warlike. Mr. 
Clifford was secretary of de- 
fense and Mr. Wameke was an 
assistant secretary of defense 
under President Lyndon B. 
Johnson. 

Mr. Harriman appointed 
them as trustees of a variety of 
trust funds for his heirs, some 
set up in 1984 and others creat- 
ed through his estate after his 
death in 1986 at the age of 94. 

Mrs. Harriman. who inherit- 
ed half of the $65 million estate 
outright, was also appointed a 
trustee. 

Mr. Clifford. 87, one of 
Washington's most influential 
power brokers before he was 
splashed by the scandal involv- 
ing the Bulk of Commerce & 
Credit International, said last 


week that he had not yet read 
the complaint. “I assume it in- 
volves certain discretionary in- 
vestments," he said. 

■“We have conducted the af- 
fairs honestly these many years 
and we do not believe there is a 
basis for the heirs to complain 
about the management of the 
trust,” he added. 

He and Mr. Wacnke re- 
mained trustees of a maze of 
funds until February, when 
they were replaced by Charles 
C. Ames, a Massachusetts law- 
yer who is married to Mr. Har- 
riman 's granddaughter, Kath- 
leen Fisk Ames. 

Mr. Ames and another trust- 
ee, W. Nicholas Thorndike, 
filed the suit on behalf of the 
heirs. 

The suit claims that the law- 
yers had promised to invest 
wisely, and indeed the $13 mil- 
lion had grown to $25 million 
by 1989. BuL the suit contends, 
the trustees began to make in- 
creasingly risky investments. 

One such venture was $21 
million to the Seasons Resort 
and Conference Center at 
Great Gorge in Vernon Valley. 
New Jersey, which the com- 
plaint describes as a “long-trou- 
bled hotel and real-estate pro- 
ject." 

The suit said that among the 
companies financing the pro- 
ject was one partly owned by 
Robert E. Brennan, founder of 
the defunct First Jersey Securi- 


ties Inc„ who faces securities 
fraud charges. 

The suif also said that the 
defendants failed to tell the 
heirs that large amounts of the 
estate's money had been 
pledged to secure loans on risky 
investments. 

Neither Mr. Wamke nor 
Mrs. Harriman could be 
reached for comment. Sondra 
McCarty, a press officer at the 
State Department said she had 
no information about the suiL 
“We don’t have anything here 
to say about it” she’ said. "This 
sounds to me a personal matter 
for the ambassador.” 

Mr. Harriman’s two daugh- 
ters, Mary' A. Fisk and Kath- 
leen L. Mortimer, who are now- 
in their late 70s, are his children 
from an earlier marriage. Mrs. 
Harriman, 74, who had previ- 
ously been married to Winston 
Churchill's son and also to the 
theater and movie producer Le- 
land Hayward, married Mr. 
Harriman, a former ambassa- 
dor to the Soviet Union and 
Britain, in 1971. 

But Mrs. Harriman. who in 
recent years was a major fund- 
raiser for the Democratic Party, 
as well as its social hostess and 
veritable matriarch, did not get 
along with his daughters and 
grandchildren, said Christo- 
pher Ogden, who wrote “Life of 
the Party: The Biography of 
Pamela Digby Churchill Hay- 
ward Harriman.” 


APOLITICAL NOTES A 


Republicans Tinker With Abortion Plank 

WASHINGTON — Conservative leaders will tr\ to rewrite 
the ami-abortion plank in the Republican Party platform to 
turn it into a statement of principled support for the rights of 
the unborn that does not specifically call for a constitutional 
amendment banning abortion. 

The major shift in strategy among some elements of the 
Republican right is based on the belief that the current 
platform is a divisive burden on Republican candidates and 
that the anti-abortion movement is concentrating far more on 
legislative restrictions than a constitutional bam 

In Lhe most dramatic development, Phyllis Schlafly of the 
conservative Eagle Forum said she supported a reused Re- 
publican plank that would “just uphold the principle that the 
unborn child has a fundamental, individual right to life." 

The proposal, which she outlined in an interview at the 
Christian Coalition meeting here, would “state the principle 
and leave the legislation and the tactics and all the specif ics 
either to the pro-life movement or to the legislation" proposed 
by individual candidates and elected officials. The "human 
life amendment is one type of specific." she said. 

Ralph Reed, executive director of the Christian Coalition, 
which will play a central role in any debate over the abortion 
plank, said “there are lots of words you can use to sa\ you are 
pro-life." 

“I think which of those words the party chooses to use are 
fine as long as it states it is pro-life and it says it is going to 
seek all legal remedies to protect the right to life.” 

"We are still discussing this issue in an environment that is 
defined by a posi-Houston trauma syndrome," he said, refer- 
ring to the Republican convention that featured tough conser- 
vative oratory, blamed by some for contributing to George 
Bush's defeat. 

For California, Pledge of ‘Secure Border' 

LOS ANGELES — Under political siege in California for 
failing to hall illegal immigration, the Clinton administration 
has answered back by announcing that it will pour federal 
resources into a new border comrol program. 

Unveiling the new effort here. Attorney General Janet 
Reno promised Californians “a secure border that is fully 
defensible against illegal immigrants." 

Dubbed “Operation Gatekeeper." the federal program in- 
cludes adding or redeploying several hundred Border Patrol 
agents, a crackdown on immigrant smugglers and new proce- 
dures to identify people who repeatedly cross the border 
illegally. 

Both through efforts on the border and new program* to 
reimburse states for the costs of services provided to illegal 
immigrants, she said Saturday. "We are working harder" to 
solve this problem than any administration in history*." 

President Bill Clinton's handling of illegal immigration has 
become a major issue in California’s light races for governor 
and the U.S. Senate, as candidates of both parties oemand 
more help from Washington. 

Even State Treasurer Kathleen Brown, the Democratic 
candidate for governor, who generally supports Clinton im- 
migration policies, demanded in a speech that the federal 
government pay for services it mandates for illegal immi- 
grants and then added her own call for greater border enforce* 
ment. i 

Governor Pete Wilson, a Republican, has been Mr. Clin- 
ton’s major antagonist, firing almost os many shoLs at the 
president recently as he has at his rival. 

The Wilson campaign is airing a television advertisement 
that flashes the White House telephone number on the screen 
and urges California voters to call Mr. Clinton and "ask him 
to control our border." i\VP) 

Quote/ Unquote 

General John Shalikashvili, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of 
Staff, on the Haiti crisis and demands for the military junta to 
resign: “We are on a very specific timetable. Thev have to • 
leave now. We are not changing our timetable." (API \ 


Havana Chips at System, Giving Farmers Leeway 


By Tim Golden 

New York Tima Service 

HAVANA — Cuba has an- 
nounced another step away 
from the highly centralized 
Communist system that has de- 
fined its economy for more than 
three decades, saying it will al- 


low all fanners to sell part of 
their produce on the open mar- 
keL 

Government officials said 
they were acting to ease the 
crushing shortages of meat, 
chicken, most vegetables and 
other food, which have set the 
black-market price of a big fish 


.Police at Simpson Crime Scene Didn’t Go by the Book 


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Los Angeles Tones Senke 
LOS ANGELES — Los An- 
geles police detectives disre- 
garded state law and their own 
departmental policy when they 
waited hours to summon, the 
county coroner to examine the 
bodies of Nicole Brown Simp- 
son and Ronald Goldman, doc- 
uments and interviews show. 

The delay hampered efforts 
to pinpoint a precise time of 
death and now looms as a scien- 
tific problem in the double- 
murder case against OJ. Simp- 
son, forensic experts say. 

Documents wow the police 
were warned two years ago that 


state law required them to no- 
tify the coroner immediately in 
cases of murder and certain 
other deaths, and the Los Ange- 
les police chief, Willie L. Wil- 
liams, responded by issuing a 
tough new policy to that effecL 

However, records show, de- 
tectives did not follow those 
guidelines in the hectic hours 
after the bodies were discovered 
shortly after midnight June 13. 

California law makes it a 
misdemeanor for a physician, 
funeral director “or other per- 
son" not to immediately notify 
the coroner about violent and 
suspicious deaths, including 


suicides and murders. The coro- 
ner’s office has legal responsi- 
bility for determining the man- 
ner and time of death. 

In the overwhelming major- 
ity of murder cases, however, 
homicide detectives say it is ei- 
ther impractical or unnecessary 
to call a coroner's investigator 
to the scene immediately. It is 
often obvious how and when a 
person was killed, they say, and 
their first duty is to preserve the 
crime scene for the collection of 
evidence. The fact that the cor- 
oner arrives later is of little con- 
sequence, they add. 

As details about the tiff over 


the delay in calling the coroner 
emerged, a defense lawyer for 
Mr. Simpson, Johnnie L. Coch- 
ran Jr., said that his client 
“wants to testify" but that the 
defense team has made no de- 
finitive decision on whether the 
former football star will take 
the stand. 

“A final decision has not 
been made because we have not 
had to make that decision,” Mr. 
Cochran said. 

Mr. Cochran said he expect- 
ed there would be “a healthy 
discussion about it" among the 
defense lawyers, that he expect- 
ed differing views, and that the 


group would try to forge a con- 
sensus and, if necessary, take a 
vote. 

At this poinL he said, “the 
majority view on the defense 
team is that Simpson should 
testify.” Efforts to contact Mr. 
Simpson’s other lead lawyer. 
Robert L. Shapiro, were unsuc- 
cessful 

A police spokesman. Lieu- 
tenant John Dunkm, said he 
would not discuss why detec- 
tives had waited to notify the 
coroner’s office in the case. 

BuL a police source close to 
the investigation added that the 
delay was “not unusuaL” 


at the equivalent or a mechan- 
ic's monthly wage. 

Several foreign experts on the 
Cuban economy said the mea- 
sure could be an important step 
toward a more productive econ- 
omy driven by material incen- 
tives, depending on how liberal- 
ly it was applied. 

But they cautioned that the 
move was still a small one when 
set against the overwhelming 
problems that have plagued 
Cuba since the fall of its Soviet- 
bloc trading partners in 1989 
and the tightening of the U.S. 
embargo three years later. 

in interviews, senior Cuban 
officials said Saturday the move 
would go far beyond the so- 
called free farmers' markets 
that Cuba created in 1980 and 
then abolished in 1986 as a 
bourgeois threat to commu- 
nism. 

Unlike that experiment, in 
which only small farmers were 
permitted to sell their surplus 


produce on the open market, 
the new policy will encompass 
everything from state farming 
cooperatives to the Cubans who 
grow vegetables in their front 
yards. 

Farmers will still have to sell 
the government a fixed amount 
of their harvest, based on what 
they grow and where they grow 
it. They will be allowed to sell 
anything they produce above 
those quotas at whatever price 
is dictated by supply and de- 
mand. The producers will be 
licensed, officials said, and their 
profits will be taxed. 

Cuban officials denied that 
the announcement was tied to 
pressure from the Clinton ad- 
ministration, which has said 
that it will ease the 32-year-old 
U.S. economic embargo against 
Cuba only if the government of 
President Fidel Castro moves 
toward free markets and demo- 
cratic politics. 

Yet in laying out the agricul- 


tural changes just a few days 
after they began trumpeting 
their successful halt to the flight 
of thousands of refugees under 
an immigration agreement with 
the United States, Cuban offi- 
cials said they hoped the mea- 
sure would contribute to an im- 
provement in the long-hostile 
relationship between the coun- 
tries. 

“This is not being done tc 
seek a reaction" from the Unit- 
ed Slates, the president of Cu- 
ba's National Assembly, Ricar- 
do Alarcbn, said in an interview 
with foreign reporters Friday 
night. “But I think it will have 
some repercussions." 

The scarcity of food and oth- 
er basics like soap was the cen- 
tral factor in the flight of more 
than 30,000 Cubans after Mr. 
Castro reacted to the hijackings 
of some state-owned vessels 
and a riot against the security 
forces in Havana on Aug. 5 bv 
allowing people to leave the in- 
land freely in homemade rafts. 


MOGUL: Truth Almost as Strange as Flying Saucer 


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AMERICAN 

TOPICS 


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Qn P lunging Tntt> the Working World 

U.S. college students are taking more and more 
tim e to graduate, The New York Times reports. And 
college officialdom is beginning to take steps to 
press perennial students to graduate and try their 
luck in the outside world, particularly now that 
enrollments are on the upswing after years of de- 
clines , 

Less than one-third of the high school class of 
1990 earned undergraduate college degrees within 
four years, down from 45 percent m 1977, when the 
National Center for Education Statistics began 
tracking graduation rates. 

Arthur Levine, president of Teachers College m 
Manhattan said, “The traditional college student 
you and I think of —full time, lives m a dorm, is 22 
years old or younger — makes up under 20 percent 
of all college students nowadays." 

In 1970, Mr. Levine said, 30 percent of the college 
population was 25 years or older. In 1990, the same 
ace group represented 45 percent of the college 
population. Today, he said, a majority of students 
work at outside jobs while attending college. 

■ The University of Texas, like other instituuoos, is 


getting impatienL One-third of its 48,000 students 
are seniors, rather than the expected one-quarter, 
and officials are concerned because the holdovers 
are taking away slots from incoming freshmen. 

Graduation rates are also low at urban colleges, 
which tend to attract poorer studeais who work full- 
or part-time and consequently take fewer courses. 
At the Gty University of New York, fewer than half 
the students graduate within 10 years. 

He’s Paid to Clean Up 
Scene of die Crime 

After Baltimore policemen have lifted the last 
fingerprint and bagged and lagged the last strand of 
hair, it’s Ray Barnes’s turn. 

Mr. Barnes saw opportunity in the gruesome 
murder scenes he came upon as a forensic investiga- 
tor in the Maryland state medical examiner’s office. 
So eight months ago, he and his wife started Crime 
Scene Clean Up Services, specializing in getting rid 
of the bloodstained evidence in Lhe aftermath of a 
violent crime. 

Typically, he and his crew pull down blood- 
spattered wallpaper, incinerate blood-soaked mat- 
tresses, wipe off the fingerprint dust the detectives 
have left on the furniture and vacuum up the chalk 
outline of the corpse on the carpeL This leaves the 
family concerned with fewer tangible reminders of 
tragedy. 

To get rid of bloodstains. Mr. Barnes uses “odor 
digester,” an enzyme that “will eat that blood right 
up. 1 tell you that stuff 
works greaL" His services cost $200 and up. 


Short Takes 

About 15 minutes of warm-up exercises can reduce 
or eliminate asthma attacks in people subject to such 
attacks when doing heavy workouts, according to a 
study appearing in the medical journal. Medicine 
and Science in Sports and Exercise, published by the 
American College of Sports Medicine. One of the 
researchers said a continuous warm-up apparently 
makes the body slowly use up the triggers that set off 
asthma attacks. 

A pregnant woman who claimed her condition gave 
her die right to drive in a freeway lane requiring at 
least two people per car lost her argument in a 
Seattle courtroom. Municipal Judge Deborah St. 
Sing found Mary Ellen Keppler guilty of violating 
the traffic ordinance and fined her $47. “1 am a 
nurse." Mrs. Keppler testified, and “we consider a 
fetus a second person." 

With retirement drawing near, the operatic sopra- 
no Leonie Rysanek wants to be remembered as an 
artisL not a star, or worse yet, she says, a legend. 
Miss Rysanek, 67. will give her final performance in 
the 1995-96 Metropolitan Opera season when she 
plays the countess in Tchaikovsky’s “The Queen of 
Spades.” 

“I want to leave the stage with a lot of voice." she 
said. “I‘d rather have people say, ‘How sad she’s 
leaving’ instead of *Why is she' still singing?’” 

The legend labeL she said, makes her sound 250 
old. Her career has spanned 45 years. 
International Herald Tribune. 


years 


Coatmued from Page 1 
ing-saucerism has become a mi- 
nor industry.” 

In 1946. Project Mogul was 
given a top-secret classification 
with the highest priority. The 
project at first used neoprene 
meteorological balloons. Later 
it pioneered the use of polyeth- 
ylene balloons, still an impor- 
tant tool of high-altitude re- 
search because their 
transparency lessens solar heat- 
ing and the up-at-day, down-at- 
nigbt cycle that such heating 
imposes on balloons. 

Readings high above the 
Earth were radioed to ground 
stations. Early test flights, be- 
fore Mogul developed its own 
sensors, carried naval underwa- 
ter sound sensors. 

“Money was no object.” Mr. 
Trakowski said. “We seemed to 
have an unlimi ted budgeL” 

The New Mexico work was 
the most extensive. Numerous 
balloon flights carried both sen- 


sors and, to aid tracking, radar 
reflectors. To the untrained eye, 
the reflectors looked odd, a geo- 
metrical hash of lightweight 
sticks and sharp angles made of 
metal foil. 

B-29 bombers, bomb- toting 
balloons and ground sites at the 
White Sands proving ground in 
New- Mexico detonated high ex- 
plosives for sound-monitoring 
experiments. 

The Soviets detonated their 
first nuclear bomb in August 
1949. Mogul detected it. most 
experts interviewed about the 
program said. But by that time 
it was clear that the work was 
doomed. The main problem 
was high-level winds that often 
pushed the balloons out of 
range of radio communications 
with the ground. The project 
was ended in late 1950. 

“Operationally it was a 
nightmare, but scientifically it 
was a great success." said Dr. 
Charles B. Moore, Mogul's pro- 


ject engineer, now emeritus pro- 
fessor of atmospheric physics at 
Ihe New Mexico Institute of 
Mining and Technology, in So- 
corro. 

Mr. Trakowski added that 
the visibility of the system, with 
its squadrons of big balloons, 
had abetted its demise. “It was 
like having an elephant in your 
backyard and hoping that no 
one would notice it,” he said. 

A final reason, said Dr.‘ 
Charles A. Ziegler, a Brandeis 
University historian writing a 
book on atomic-age spying, was 
that government research 
showed that sound waves from 
distant blasts could be moni- 
tored on the ground. 


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INTERNATIONAL l ff-WAin TRIBUNE, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 1994 


Japan Welcomes UJS. Riding I Si W re Arrests U.S. Executive in Assault Case 

■1 Pkili’n ^fiennn arc Rut nnlitp Mr Fnv FrrehiiPs nttfi V9S lltinlsted to nra rmnsaniatniM itnut matp )LouisiSIl& tbit t 


Verdict in Student’s Slaying Turns Attitudes Around 


By TJL Reid 

Wadurtgtoft Pat Service 


creased Japan’s sense of dread and disgust A 
new national organization was formed here 


TOKYO— Maybe the United States is not “Ued the “AssotiatiOT of^Survivors of Mur- 


such a terrifying place after all 
That at least is what Japan’s news organi- 


der Victims in the U.S A” 

The killing s of the Japanese students, to- 

. . . _ ... - «■ P Uh-.'uIH 


zations were saying afterTLouisiana state media foc^ cm Amen- 

judge found a Baton Rouge homeowner liable. su£ as John and Lorena Bobbitt and 

for shooting and killing a Japanese exchange Tanya Harding, have fed a growing sense 
student who had knocked on the wrong door here of adturalsupenonty. There is asmmg 


while looking for a Halloween party. 

By the megabucks standards of modem 
U.S. civil suits, a $653,000 award in a wrong- 


consensus spreading in East Asia that the 
disciplined, Confudan nations in this part of 
the world are inherently superior to the indi- 


MMA ~ St vi^^for^ AmctosocK^ 

Judge Bill Brown's judgment in that amount But m orthe eivnsurtv'ctoryby 

Ihiusday in the BatonRouge case became the slam study's parents, theJapmese me- 
ftont-page news all over Japan and seemed ** ' Bve ““PP® 1 *•“ oti>er ws- 

luf.-i • ■ - ■ -- — _ eitaw Taa. an iraAf nrh*n ttuk mO*l nlflA mm 


likely to have an important impact on Japa- 
nese attitudes toward the United States. 


“Last year, when the man who killed an 
innocent, unarmed teenager was acquitted, I 


By Philip Shenon 

New York Tima Service 

SINGAPORE — Only 
months after a furor over the 
flogging of an American teen- 
ager, the United States and Sin- 
gapore may again be on a colli- 
sion course, this time over the 
arrest of an American business- 
man on assault charges. 

Die case of the teenager, Mi- 
chael Fay, 18, is linked to that 
of the businessman, Robert 
FreehiB, a 51 -year-old aero- 
space executive who has lived in 
Singapore for nine years. 

Mr. Frednll is the father of 
one of the teenagers arrested 
with Mr. Fay last fall and 
charged with spray-painting 


cars. But unlike Mr, Fay, who FieehflPs case was unrelated to ness representatives must make Loiiowma that the charges were 

__ WK.1 . A Ue »M>r — , " a “tAfal fnknmtiAn. 


was jailed, and lashed with a his sou’s 
rattan cane, Mr. FredrilTs 17- The 2 
year-old son, Stephen, was al- Saturda; 
lowed to leave Singapore after the case 
pleading guilty to lesser charges expect S 
and paying a SS35 fine. to treat 

_ , . - , ... made tfc 

The elder Frednll was arrest- R0TCrnn 

ed last month on charges rang- fieehilL 
ing from using abusive lan- 
guage to assault, some of them 
dating to an incident in 1992. 

His case has alarmed other UB. 7^^ 
businessmen here, to whom it 1 


his sou’s. 

The Suae Department said 
Saturday that “we are following 


on their own." . 

In what appears to be the 
most serious charge against Mr. 


most saious charge against Mr. 
FrechiD, he is aocnsed of kick- 
S S KfSg mgitedoorofaarmDeaan- 

ber 1992 duringa traffic scuffle, 
bruising the tilt of the driver, a 


a “total fabrication. 

In its statement the Singa- 
pore Embassy is Washington 
sakU. 

“It £5 amply the law taking itsfr 
course. The police duly investi- 
gated and satisfied themselves 


has been im- 


Asked whether U.S. business 
people living in Singapore had 


Mr. Frednll is. also accused - charging Mr. FrednD for the 
of using abusive language to a incident in 1992 had resulted 
police officer in May of this from «Mre. FreduHYre 
year and of yelling a racial epi- lt jnsa[ to cooperate wi 


looks uncomfortably like a ven- reason to be concernedfor their thet at a Singaporean business- malot a statement to the police. 

status in a councrv once consid- man and then pushing the bust- Mrs. Frednll said that that wa 


acwa - status in a country once cornid- man ana 

But the Singapore Embassy ered a dose ally of the United nesanan. 
in Washington said that Singa- States, a State Department Grace! 
pore had no vendetta against spokesman in Washington said, in a tdq 
the United States and that Mr. ‘That is a decision that busi- the fazmi 


man and then pushing the busi- Mrs. Frednll said that that was 
nessman. “completely untrue” and that 


Grace FrcdrQI, his wife, said when she offered to make a 
in a telephone interview from statement in 1992, a police offi- 
the family’s second home in cer told ber it was unnecessary. 


“This verdict is a victory for American said that American society was unbelicv- 
society ” said Yuko Ando, a Fuji-TV anchor- able," Tetsuya C h i k u s hi, Japan’s most influ- 


woman. “It shows that Americans do deal 
with their social problems.” 


ential anchorman, said on his TBS-TV news 
program Friday. “But with this dvQ verdict, 


When the 16-year-old student, Yoshihiro and with Congress passing new gun control 
Hatton, was shot to death two years ago, this laws, we should recognize that America is a 
peaceful, largely crime-free country was bor- society that can change a lot in a couple of 
rified. When the killer, Rodney Peairs, was years. 5 ’ 


Taiwan Missile Downs Civilian Jet in Error 


BOOKS 


acquitted of criminal charges by a jury, all the 
Japanese stereotypes of a gun-crazed United 
States were confirmed. 

A series of other killings and assaults on 
Japanese students in recent months has in- 


It was not the amount of money awarded in 
the Baton Rouge case that mattered here. 
Rather, the crucial point for the Japanese was 
that the judge had ruled there was “no justifi- 
cation" for the shooting. 


Revim Eagle Airlines, was towing a 

TAIPEI — A naval anti-air- drone in the first public re- 
craft missile hit a civilian plane hearsal Saturday for a military 
instead of (he target drone it exercise when it was shot down 
was towing, killing all four poo- by an air-defense missile fired 
pie aboard, a Taiwanese Navy from a naval frigate, the spokes- 
spokesman said Sunday. man said. 

The Lear 35, a jet. leased to The plane, engulfed by fire 
the navy by the private Golden and thick smoke, plunged into 


the sea before an audience of BRANDO: Songs My Moth- 
3 000 guests at the rehearsal, for er Taught Me 
the island s biggest military ex- 6 


erase in many years. By Marlon Brando with Robert 

The military exercise is due Lindsey. Illustrated. 468 pages. 
to begirt oa Sept. 27 near Tai- S2 5 Random House. 


The plane, engulfed by fire The navy has begun an inqui- Reviewed by 
ad thick smoke, plunged into iy, the spokesman said. Michiko Kakutani 

A S Stanley, the brutish de- 
stroyer of innocence in “A 


AUIHOIUXA3TVE, 
YE T UNBIASE D. 

That's what our subscribers 
are saying about us.* 


BRANDO: Songs My Moth- He also tells us how his emo- 
— vv, , . tional insecurity as aribild gave 

er t aught Me him a reservoir of intense emo- 

By Marion Brando with Robert tions to draw upon as an -actor. 
Lindsey. Illustrated. 468 pages. Modest to the point of self- 
$25. Random House. 

Reviewed by hood), Brando continually^ 

Michiko Kakutani plays down his accomplish- 

ments as an actor. 

A S Stanley, the brutish de- fj c that his famous 

stroyer of innocence in “A ia “On the Waterfront,” 

Streetcar Named Desire”; as when his character says “1 
Johnny, the brooding gang could have been a contender,” 
leader in “The Wild One”; as was “actor-proof,” and says be 
Ken, the anxioos war veteran ih “never bdievedT he played his. 
“The Men,” and as Terry, the role in “Streetcar” successfully. 

As for his famous role as Vito 
Corleone, Brando writes: 
“When I saw The Godfather 1 
the first time, it made me sick; 
L an I could see were my mistakes 

seemed to sum up the yearnings and I hated it.” 
and discontents (rf a generation. - _ , • . . 

As Richard Sdiickd“ibeau- 

thor erf an illuminating study of deni- 

Brando’s woSTonceput it: an technrque,_he repeatedly dem- 


ity infonned most of Brando's 

early roles, and the suspense in ways convincingly) that 
L came to regard it simply as a 


10 make a lot of money. ^ 


sar*) revolved around whether 
, or not he would acknowledge 
his best self, articulate his aspi- 


Of his decision to appear m 
Elia(Gadg) Kazan’s movie “On 
the Waterfront,” after Kazan 


rations and his pain. In all of had named names before the 


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them he eventually did.” 

The same might be said of 
Brando's long-awaited autobi- 
ography. Written with a former 
New York Times correspon- 
dent, Robert Lindsey, “Brando: 
Songs My Mother Taught Me” 
is a candid, revealing book in 
which the actor not only speaks 
openly about acting and the 


House Committee on Un- 
American Activities, he writes: 
“I finally decided to do the film, 
but what Z didn’t realize then 
was that *On the Waterfront’ 
was really a metaphorical argu- 
ment by Gadg and Budd SchuW 
berg: they made the film tojus^ 
txfy finking °n their friends.” 

When it comes to individuals 


openly about acting and me When it cranes to mdrviduais 
roles that made him famous brn in Brando's professional and 
also lays out the emotional dif- private life, he is equally blunt 



' faculties he says he suffered as He says he had an affair with 
j the son of an alcoholic mother Marilyn Monroe, talked to her 
and a cruel, bullying father. two or three days before her 
Although Brando adamantly death and has always believed 
•dedines to speak about his mar- that “shewas- murdered.. ..jr- 
riages or his children, he is re- He says he admixed Charlie 
. rreshingjy, sometimes bizarrely Chaplin’s films for years, but 
outspoken about his own life, found the actor and director “a 
i from his loss of virginity with fcaisomely cruel man” in per- 
an older woman to fis difficul- son. And he says he always had 
ties in finding a sympathetic “little respect” for the acting 


* The 1 994 IHT Reader Satisfaction Survey. 


psychiatrist to bis desire to use 
meditation in place of anesthe- 
sia for his recent circumdrion. 

Incidents are more or less re- 
lated in chronological order, 
but the narrative has the loop- 
ing, allusive feel of a therapy 
session and its self-revelatory 
character. 

Brando tells us about his 
sense of abandonment as a 
j child and how his fear of rq'ec- 


teacher Lee Stiasbeig, whom he 
accuses of bastardizing the term 
Method acting. 

Though some of Brando's 
views (snch as his belief in the 
use of genetic alteration to cre- 
ate a more loving human race) 
are downright bizarre, the 
book’s Iradgcpodge narrative 
does succeed in givmg the read- 
er a vivid, impressionistic por- 
trait of Brando as, by turn, na- 


— 1 . 1 0 I 1 juuwumwito aiuma w^iuuiutu- 

Ur send in me coupon below. pie women. He tells us how his 

M ■ mmmm ■ huh ■ hum ■ mmm ■ om—m m muu ■ tmmm m ■■ ■ m wmmm father’s continual put-downs 


tion often led him to pursue jvc, impulsive, confused and 
simultaneous affairs with multi- idealistic. 


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father’s continual put-downs 
left him with a lingering hatred 
of authority. 


Michiko Kakutani is on the 
staff of The New York Times, jp 


WHAT THEY RE READING 


• Hubertus Veozfaff, reli- 
gious affairs teacher in Batin, is 
reading the Goman version of 
"The Book af the Just ” by Eric 
Silver. 

“This is a book about ordi- 
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mmmm 


By Alan Truscott 

I N the final of the Von 
Zedtwitz Double Knockout 
Team Championship, a team, 
headed by Jerry Goldberg and 
including Bob Jaffe, Nancy Ka- 
low, Jane DQknberg ana Jeff 
Rothstdn, seemed poised to 
take the title. 

The deciding deal in the ffaat 
stage is shown in the diagram. 
The South cards were bad by 
the captain of the oppoang 
team, Claire Tornay. 

After an opening weak two- 
heart bid by West, one might 
expect East to raise to game. 
Four hearts succeeds easily, and 
can make an overtrick, but 
South would probably bid four 
spades. Both East players, how- 
ever, chose to bid two no- 
trump, and South was able to 
bid three spades. 

Against Mrs. Tornay, East 
chose to double three spades. 
West led the heart ace, and. 
shifted lo a trump with the idea 
of stopping a dub ruff. This; 
defense might wefl have suc- 
ceeded if East’s dub had in- 
cluded the nine, but as it was. - 
South led clubs front her hand 
and could sot be defeated. 


Notice that the defense 
would have done no better if 
West had continued a heart at 
the second trick or shifted to a 
diamond. By working on dubs 
South will stiQ merge with nine 
tricks whatever the defense. 

In the replay. East bid four 
hearts in pref eren ce to doubling 
three spades, and East-West- 
scored a game. The double 
game swing gave Mrs. Tomay’s 
team 14 inms, and when afl the 
deeds had been compared, she 
and her teammates had won the 
tide by jbst 2 imps. 

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Haitian soldiers, members of the press and demonstrators mingled Sunday outside military headquarters in Port-au- 
Prince, where Jimmy Carter, the former U.S. president, continued negotiations with the country’s military leadership. 

Networks Resist a Blackout of Invasion Coverage 


By Howard Kurtz 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The Clinton ad- 
ministration initially proposed a news 
blackout for the first six or eight hours of 
the planned invasion of Haiti, sources 
said, but it has backed off in a compro- 
mise with four major television net- 
works. 

U.S. officials told network executives 
that some in the administration wanted 
an initial mandatory blackout to protect 
UK troops, sources involved in the dis- 
cussions said The networks called the 
proposal “unacceptable,"* one television 
executive said. 

In a meeting with network executives 
Saturday, admmistration officials agreed 
to accept a voluntary embargo on the 


broadcasting of sensitive pictures for one 
hour after U.S. troops anive in Haiti. 
The television executives said they would 
withhold footage that might disclose the 
location of troop landings. 

A seven-point agreement, obtained by 
The Washington Post, described this as a 
“voluntary embargo of all broadcast vid- 
eo depicting or describing troop landing 
locations during the first hour of (he 
intervention.” 

While the meeting was conciliatory, 
participants said, David R. Gergen, the 
State Department adviser, warned that if 
the administration felt U.S. soldiers had 
been killed because of network pictures, 
it would say so publicly. Lieutenant 
General John J. Sheehan of the Marines, 
director of operations for the Joint 


Chiefs of Staff, said that Lieutenant 
General Raoul Cedras, the Haitian lead- 
er, was known to monitor CNN. 

In warning journalists to stay off roof- 
tops. participants said. General Sheehan 
said that in the event of sniper fire U.S. 
bombers might take out a building and 
would have no way of knowing who was 
on the roof. 

Asked about the blackout plan. Dee 
Dee Myers, the White House press secre- 
tary, said, “That is not our proposal at 
all," although she acknowledged that it 
had been “discussed internally." A se- 
nior administration official insisted that 
a blackout had “never been a serious 
proposition." and another called it “a 
negotiating position.” 


HAITI: 17.5. Team Extends Negotiations After Warning Military Leaders 

Continued from Page 1 ■ •!._ la.-c* round of meetings to keen families while heinp recnnn.cihle for the 


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and that the other two must either resign 
from. the army or leave the nation. 

Mr. Carter's delegation met first with 
retired General Herard Abraham, who was 
commander-in-chief of the army when Mr. 
Carter visited Haiti in 1990 to observe the 
presidential elections won by the Reverend 
Jcan-Bertrand Aristide. The delegation 
then met with the military high command, 
had dinner with a group of influential 
businessmen, and later met with members 
of Parliament. Late Saturday night the 
military high command requested another 
meeting with the UK delegation, which 
lasted until 1:40 A.M. Sunday 

Later in the morning the delegation met 
with supporters of Father Aristide and 
then with the de facto president, Emile 
Jonassamt At 1 1 AAL they began another 
round of meetings with the high command, 
which lasted about six hours. 

While General C6dras and General 
Biamby attended the talks, Mr. Franqois 
did not because be is not a member of the 
high command. Sources close to military 
said that Mr. Francois had agreed to ac- 
cept whatever the high command decided 
and had said he was ready to accept exile 
or dismissal from the army if that were 
necessary to reach a deaL 

Sources dose to the talks said Mr. Car- 
ter phoned Mr. Clinton at least once dur- 


ing the latest round of meetings to keep 
him briefed. 

The sources said each of the three princi- 
pals in the U.S. ddegation emphasized a 
different point of the mission in (he hopes 
of impressing on the Haitian army leaders 
that, if they did not step aside peacefully 
there would be a quick, massive display of 
UK force to oust them. 

In turn, the military’s concerns centered 
on questions of their personal security and 
the security of the troops left behind. Ac- 
cording to two sources with direct knowl- 
edge of the talks. General Cedras was the 
only officer who talked throughout most of 
the meetings. 

General Biamby, according to the 
sources, talked at the end of the first meei- 
' ing for about four minutes, trying to open 
conversations about Father Aristide and 
his fitness for holding office. However, he 
was told by all three U.S. delegates that the 
deposed president's return was a given and 
not open to any sort of discussion. 

However, the sources said, Mr. Carter 
offered the officers two choices: the 
chance to stay during the brief period 
between agreeing to resign and the arrival 
of international troops, with Mr. Carter 
staying to guarantee their safety, or. if they 
fail to resign, facing the possibility of phys- 
ical harm to both themselves and their 


families, while being responsible for Lhe 
destruction of the army as an institution. 

“He was very, very tough." one source 
said. "Carter was the one who raised the 
possibility of physical harm. Powell, who is 
the one most waiched. also was very direct, 
very forceful and very unambiguous. The 
message was they could leave with honor 
and not look like they were running, or 
they could run and risk the consequences." 

"Carter emphasized the mission had 
only two purposes." said another source 
brief bv the U.S. representatives. “First, 
the military leaders must leave, and sec- 
ond, President Aristide is going to return. 
He said there would be a massive military 
force arriving if there were an invasion, 
probably meaning the loss of life and ma- 
jor destruction. The Haitian Army would 
be destroyed, and the leaders and their 
families wifi be suffering.” 

Father Aristide, who was Haiti’s first 
democratically elected president, was 
overthrown by the military three years ago. 
Despite the apparent toughness of the UK. 
delegation's words, his followers here were 
furious at what they perceived as Mr. Clin- 
ton's willingness to engage in a new set of 
negotiations. 

“We just hope this is not another betray- 
al by the Americans, who always wanted to 
save the army.” one pro-Aristide activist 
said. 


FORCE; Pentagon Says Any Delay Will Not Affect Readiness of Troops 



Continued from Page 1 

to 20.000 U.S. troops could invade Haiti 
once they received the order. 

At the Pentagon, officials said the fleet 
of warships, including the aircraft carriers 
Eisenhower and America, and troops were 
in place near Haiti. 

The Eisenhower is carrying 2,000 U.S. 
Army troops from the 10th Mountain Di- 
vision at Fort Drum, New York, and 50 
attack and transport helicopters. 

The America carries 2,000 troops from 
die 82d Airborne Division and additional 
Special Forces troops and helicopters. 


Also off northern Haiti is the big U.S. 

S er assault ship Wasp, which is ex- 
to launch a force of about 1 .800 
; against the northern Haitian port 
of Cap-Haitien at the same time that annv 
airborne and special forces troops move 
against the capital of Port-au-Prince. 

In a possible tip-off to American mili- 
tary action, a team of 48 foreign military 
observers were withdrawn from the Hai- 
tian-Dommican Republic border Saturday 
night. Major Hector Herrera of the UK 
Army, spokesman for the force, said Sun- 
day. 

The monitors were sent to Santo Do- 


mingo, the Dominican capital. The U.S.. 
Canadian and Argentine soldiers had been 
stationed on the border to observe that 
Do mini can forces were maintaining the 
UN economic embargo on Haiti. 

“The primary reason is safety," Major 
Herrera said. “With some sort of resolu- 
tion forthcoming — diplomatic or by in- 
tervention — the sanctions enforcement 
team is more concerned now about the 
safety of its observers.” 

The sanctions were imposed in an effort 
to force out the military junta, which 
seized power in September 1991. 

( Reuters, AFP. API 


SWEDEN; A Swing Back to Socialism, and Carlsson 

' . | gotten poorer,” it said. But active voting season in Europe. 

Contmued tram rage is standing on the Denmark votes next week; Ger- 


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that they have to hurt the elder- 
ly people and so forth.” 

Mr. Carlsson’ s campaign 
manifesto was intended un- 
abashedly to scare the Swedes. 

“No government will be able 
to disgiSe the fact that webave 

Buxines* Massage Center 

may Wednesday 


gotten poorer,” it said. But 
•‘Sweden is standing on the 
threshold of a new, frightening 
society where mass unemploy- 
ment becomes permanent and 
the divisions between people 
widen.” It continued: “For the 
first time in modem history 
children and young people risk 
bring worse off than the previ- 
ous generation.” 

The election inaugurates an 


active voting season in Europe. 
Denmark votes next week; Ger- 
many in October. Sweden, Fin- 
land and Norway hold referen- 
dums over the next few months 
on whether to join the Europe- 
an Union, a subtext in the elec- 
tion in Sweden. The theme ev- 
erywhere is the economy, 
largely because of the recession 
from which the Continent is 
now emerging. 


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Haiti Talks Baffle Junta Foes 

Invasion on Hold, but Not the Killings in Slums 






By Rick Bragg 

Yfi r York Tima Service 

PORT-AU-PRINCE. Haiti — For Haitians 
who have prayed for bombs to blow their tor- 
mentors from the earth, the anival of three 
respected Americans to meet with Lieutenant 
General Raoul Cedras has offered scant comfort. 

Poor opponents of Haiti's military junta are 
still being slain at the rate oF three or four a day. 
residents of the capital’s slums say. .And they 
doubt that the killing will stop while the United 
Slates defers an invasion and Jimmy Carter, 
retired General Colin L. Powell and Senator Sara 
Nunn talk with General Cedras. 

Even as crowds of supposedly pro-Cedras 
demonsimors were trucked out to’ the airport to 
meet the U.S. delegation, others cruised through 
the slums with machine guns, searching for peo- 
ple who talk too loud or too much about pros- 
pects for the return of the deposed president, the 
Reverend Jean-Bertrand Aristide. 

The people of the slums want action now. said 
Emmanuel Lejol, a 21 -year-old Aristide support- 
er. Every day of negotiation, every 1 day the mili- 
tary regime stays in power, he said, “the under- 
taker counts his money.” He said Haitians may 
not amount to much “in the eyes of most of the 
Americans. But every day of talk kills us.” 

Many people in- Haiti’s poorest areas believed 
an invasion was coming, and until President Bill 
Clinton decided to send a team of negotiators 
many Haitians said they believed it was coming 
soon. Now many say they do not know what to 
think 

Funerals have become an occasion for rage as 
much as sorrow, but people are uncertain who 
deserves more blame — the pro-government 
thugs who kill their relatives, or the Clinton 
administration, which builds up hope by threat- 
ening an invasion but then delays action. 


Last week, a young man the neighbors called 
Ti Pierre was buried. Ti Pierre attended an anti- 
government Protestant church that has seen sev- 
en members of its congregation shot down in the 
last three years. Gunmen flicked his life away 
with their trigger fingers and left unhurried and 
unconcerned, as the people on the street hid their 
faces. 

Signs are that Haiti’s poorest people will back 
the American military when it arrives, bm many 
Of them are beginning to criticize U.S. 
politicians. 

Samuel Cadeau, a political worker for Father 
Aristide who is hiding in a safe house in Port-au- 
Prince. echoed the remarks of many Haitians 
who fear the United States is increasing their 
chances of getting killed. 

“Just do it,** he said of the invasion. “When the 
UK. politicians talk of war. of overthrowing the 
government, and do nothing, what do they think 
mat does to us? If America continues to threaten. 
3nd does not do it, we will not be here.” 

The joke in Port-au-Prince is that by the time 
the Americans reach the shore, they- will be 
liberating no cue who cast a vote for Father 
Aristide, though they will find a lot of people 
who will promise to vote for him “next lime.” 
Under Haitian law, he cannot run again when his 
term expires in early 1996. 

What Father Aristide’s supporters (ear most, 
many said, is not random killing, but the system- 
atic purge of his supporters should the United 
States fall to act. 

“The people are in torment,” said Jean Joseph, 
a former official under Father Aristide’s govern- 
ment who fled his home after his life was threat- 
ened. “They stand up on the roof and see the 
ships and watch the helicopters circle around it. 
It is torture for them.” 


French Rightist to Ron 
In *95 Presidential Race 

Agence France-Pressc 

PARIS — ■ The leader of 
France’s extreme-right Nation- 
al Front, Jean-Marie Le Pen, 
announced formally Sunday 
that he would stand as a candi- 
date in die presidential elec- 
tions scheduled for May 1995. 

During the last presidential 
election, in 19S8. he took 14.61 
percent of the vote. 


Karl Popper, 
Philosopher, 
Dead at 92 


The Associated Press 

CROYDON. England — 
The philosopher Karl Popper, 
92, one of the most prominent 
anti-Marxist voices, whose 
views helped frame the ideals of 
Britain’s conservative govern- 
ment in the 1980s. died Satur- 
day. 

Mr. Popper died of complica- 
tions of cancer, pneumonia and 
kidney failure. 

Much of his work and 
thought concerned science and 
the uncertainty of knowledge. 
But it was for his views on 
Marxism and communism that 
the Austrian-born philosopher 
was most widely known. 

His ideas and those of the 
economists Friedrich Hayek 
and Milton Friedman were 
viewed as providing the intel- 
lectual framework of the Con- 
servative Party under former 
Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher. 

Mr. Popper’s anti-Marxist 
book, “The Open Society and 
Its Enemies." published in 
1945, has been called one of the 
most influential books of the 
century. 

He questioned the idea that 
there are inexorable laws of hu- 
man history, arguing that histo- 
ry is influenced by the growth 
of knowledge, which is unpre- 
dictable. 

In his philosophy. Mr. Pop- 
per argued that science does not 
proceed through verification 
but through falsification: The 
scientific theory that survives 
attempts to disprove it is the 
one that is accepted, however 
temporarily. 

Cardinal Albert Decourtray, 
Leader of French Catholics 

LYON (Reuters) — Cardinal 
Albert Decourtray, 71. the head 
of France’s Roman Catholics 
and regarded as a liberal con- 
science of the church, died Fri- 
day after a cerebral hemor- 
rhage. 

An outspoken campaigner 
for social justice. Cardinal De- 
courtray courted controversy 
by siding with workers against 
the government, spoke out for 
the rights of prisoners and often 
criticized racists. 

Alain Bernanfio, Director 
Of Paris Striptease Club 

PARIS (AP) — Alain Ber- 
nardin, 78, founder and direc- 
tor of the Crazy Horse Saloon, 
which gave new cachet to strip- 
tease, was found dead Thurs- 
day. 

The club manager. Louis Ca- 
miret, said Mr. Bemardin was 
found by associates in his office 
with a gun by his side. 

Kari Ddnch, 79, an opera 
singer and former director of 
Vienna's popular Volksoper, 
died Friday. 


Antarctic Blooms as Climate 
Warms, Researcher Asserts 


LONDON — Scientists have found that global warming 
has led to a rapid increase in plant life on the Antarctic 
continent, a British newspaper said Sunday. 

Researchers of the British Antarctic Survey have delected 
an explosion in the numbers of the continent’s only two 
flowering plants, while new species are appearing as long- 
frozen seeds are freed by melting ice. The Independent on 
Sunday said. 

“This is part of the global warming situation.” said a 
scientist with the survey. Ron Lewis Smith, who is author of a 
paper about to be published on the phenomenon. The study- 
shows a 25-fold increase to 17.500 in the number of Antarctic 
hairgrass plants on Galindez Island over the past 30 years. 

The other plant, the Antarctic pearl wort, also increased 
sharply, while the area covered by plants increased on Galin- 
dez and on Signy Island in the South Orkneys. Researchers 
have also found' two new 1 species previously unknown in 
Antarctica. 

“The greening of Antarctica is a slow but significant 
process.” Mr. "Lewis Smith said. 


‘Bridge Too Far' Tragedy 
Commemorated in Arnhem 


Kcuien 

ARNHEM, Netherlands — 
World War II veterans and 
their families, many weeping 
openly, attended an emotional 
service near this southeastern 
Dutch city on Sunday to hear 
Britain’s Prince Charles pay 
tribute to their comrades who 
died here 50 years ago. 

The service was pan of week- 
end events to commemorate the 
battle, portrayed in the film "A 
Bridge Too Far.” in which the 
British 1st Airborne Division 
took a severe beating while try- 
ing to hold Arnhem and a vital 
bridge over the Lower Rhine. 

Prince Charles. Queen Bea- 
trix of the Netherlands and oth- 
er officials laid wreaths under a 
stone cross at the head of the 


1,755 while gravestones set out 
in rows of flower beds. 

Three Allied airborne divi- 
sions jumped in the eastern 
Netherlands on SepL 17, 1944, 
as part of an effort io smash 
through to Germany and end 
the war by Christmas. The op- 
eration was disastrous for the 
British division, with only 
about a quarter of its total man- 
power escaping death or cap- 
ture at Arnhem. 

On Saturday, several British 
paratroopers were injured in an 
airdrop, and a long-awaited 
jump by about 60 veterans was 
canceled. But about a dozen 
British veterans did re-enact 
their parachute jumps of 50 
years ago on Sunday at nearby 
Teuge airfield. 


WITCH: A Legacy of Liberation 


Continued from Plage 1 

that was the trademark method 
of executing political enemies. 

“There has been witchcraft 
from time immemorial,” said 
Ret Magate, a grandfather ban- 
ished from the village of ga- 
Kolopo under suspicion of call- 
ing down the lightning that 
lolled a young girl. “But witches 
were never necklaced.” 

“In the old days, the victim of 
the witch would go and hire a 
nyanga. a witch doctor, to re- 
verse the spell," said Abram 
Maharala. who was evicted 
from his home in the village of 
Bayswater for suspected witch- 
ery and is now camped with his 
family and six others in a tent 
city behind the Matlala police 
station. 

“Everyone knows you cannot 
smell out a witch,” he said. 
“Only a nyanga can do thaL" 


A suspected witch might be 
banished from the village, el- 
ders recall, and perhaps there 
were isolated instances of ven- 
geance. 

Chief Agnes Moloto, who in- 
herited a major Nonhem Sotho 
chief tranship when her husband 
died in 1980. said she suddenly 
found she was losing subjects to 
the torch every month, and ref- 
ugees were camping at her trib- 
al office. 

Braving the anger of the 
mobs. Chief Moloto created a 
sanctuary village populated en- 
tirely by people accused of be- 
ing witches where 20 families 
have been resettled in one of the 
world's more unusual refugee 
camps. 

“There were objections, yes, 
but we have to be firm and 
strong and use our power," she 
said of the grumbles from her 
constituents. 


5 Killed 
In Raid on 
UN Team 
In Egypt 

By Chris Hedges 

\e* York Tunes Serv ice 

CAIRO — Gunmen believed 
to be Muslim militants opened 
fire on UN aid officials and 
their police escort on a road in 
southern Egypt, killing five 
people. 

The attack, the deadliest at- 
tributed to militants since 
March, came as the UN offi- 
cials and four police officers 
were traveling north from Lux- 
or in separate cars Saturday to 
open a clinic near Qena. 

Both cars were hit, and the 
four officers and an Egyptian 
worker for Unicef were killed. 

Die UN was withholding the 
name of the slain staff worker, 
but an Interior Ministry state- 
ment identified him as Labib 
Ibrahim, a cameraman. An as- 
sistant project manager, also an 
Egyptian, was wounded and 
suffered head injuries, a Unicef 
spokeswoman. Nugwa Farag, 
said. 

The Unicef representative in 
Egypt, Baquer Namazi of the 
United States, and his deputy, 
Vanessa Tobin of Britain, were 
in the Unicef car but not hurt. 

Interior Ministry officials 
said they suspected that the at- 
tack had been the work of the 
militant Islamic Group, which 
has been waging a violent cam- 
paign for more than two years 
to topple the secular govern- 
ment of President Hosni Mu- 
barak. 

The gunmen, who ambushed 
the cars near Khuzam. 5 IS kilo- 
meters (320 miles) south of Cai- 
ro, recovered the police officers’ 
weapons from the lead car and 
escaped into the surrounding 
farmland. 

More than 400 people have 
died in the campaign of vio- 
lence by Muslim militants in 
Egypt. * 

Its targets are police and gov- 
ernment officials, as well as for- 
eign tourists, Coptic Christians 
and intellectuals. 

■ 3 Extremists Killed 

Police killed three suspected 
Muslim extremists in southern 
Egypt. The Associated Press re- 
ported from Cairo. 


Arafat Aide 
Quits Post 
In Dispute 

Hushutgtun Post Service 

JERUSALEM — A Palestin- 
ian who helped broker the his- 
toric Israeli-Paleslinian accord 
Iasi year has resigned from the 
Palestinian self-rule authority 
because of dissatisfaction with 
the way Yasser Arafat is gov- 
erning. 

Mr. Arafat, chairman of the 
Palestine Liberation Organiza- 
tion, has not accepted the resig- 
nation of the official, Ahmad 
Korei, the minister of economy 
and trade. Some Palestinian ob- 
servers say the two may yet 
work out their disagreements. 
Mr. Korei. who is known as 
Abu Alaa, declined to com- 
ment. 

Observers viewed the move 
as a sign of escalating disen- 
chantment among longtime 
supporters of Mr. Arafat with 
the way he is presiding over 
self-rule in the Gaza Strip and 
in Jericho. 

Mr. Korei, long the principal 
Palestinian negotiator with Is- 
rael on economic affairs and a 
confidant of Mr. Arafat's, has 
been critical of the Palestinian 
leader's refusal to delegate au- 
thority to new economic institu- 
tions.’ Mr. Korei, who heads the 
Palestinian Economic Council 
for Development and Recon- 
struction, found that Mr. Ara- 
fat had made decisions involv- 
ing the council without 
informing him. 

Several sources said breaking 
point for Mr. Korei came last 
week, when Mr. Arafat named 
another minister, Nabil Shaath, 
to head the Palestinian delega- 
tion at a crucial meeting in Paris 
with countries that have 
pledged aid to the self-rule au- 
thority. 


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Page 6 


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 1994 

OPINION 


2tcraU> 


INTERNATIONAL 



PUBLISHED WUH THE NEW KIRK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


(tribune While America Dithered , Haiti Suffered 

THE WASHINGTON POST •» •» 


Carter’s Special Vision 


In undertaking a special mission to 
Haiti for President Bill Clinton, Jimmy 
Carter is showing once again that a for- 
mer president can be a unique diplomatic 
resource. This is Mr. Carter's most dra- 
matic, but not his first venture into very 
choppy waters. He has helped his nation 
as peacemaker, backstage diplomat, 
monitor of foreign elections and advo- 
cate for the homeless, while finding time 
to write poetry and by his own example 
provides the best kina of case for tradi- 
tional religious values. 

Mr. Carter, who will be 70 on Oct. I, 
deserves the growing harvest of honors 
from Americans who seem surprised to 
discover how much the Georgian has 
grown in stature since his defeat in 1980 
by Ronald Reagan. 

The most recent award — the J. Wil- 
liam Fulbright Prize for International 
Understanding — came with an acco- 
lade from the awards committee chair- 
man, Stanley Katz of the American 
Council of Learned Societies: “Jimmy 
Carter has done more for public service 
in general and for the promotion of 
mutual understanding among nations in 
particular than any American chief ex- 
ecutive since John Quincy Adams." 

After leaving the White House, Ad- 
ams returned to Washington as a mem- 
ber of the House of Representatives, 
where he fought eloquently against slav- 
ery and helped draft the charter of the 
Smithsonian Institution. 

Other former presidents have struggled 
with less success to use their special status 
and experience for the commonweaL 
Most have written memoirs, some have 


striven to be elder statesmen while shun- 
ning real risks, others have turned to golf 
or (in the case of Teddy Roosevelt) stren- 
uous feats of hunting and exploration. 

Mr. Carter has not flinched from risk- 
taking and has played a crucial role as an 
honest broker, most notably in spurring 
nuclear talks with North Korea but also in 
conflicts in Ethiopia, Sudan and Liberia- 

Some of his good works, such as spare- 


time house-building for the poor, are 
plainly meant to whip up publicity and 


plainly meant to whip up publicity and 
thus goad others to action. But little fan- 
fare attends most of the achievements of 
the Carter Center, a nonprofit organiza- 
tion based in Atlanta whose goals include 
conflict resolution, promoting democra- 
cy , elimina ting disease and regenerating 
inner dries. The center has monitored 
elections in eight countries, including 
Panama and Paraguay; it has distributed 
the drug Mcctizan to 9.5 million people 
in Africa and Latin America to prevent 
river blindness and has led a campaign to 
eradicate Guinea worm disease in Africa 
and the Indian subcontinent. 

Mr. Carter, who has now been nomi- 
nated for the fifth time for a Nobel Peace 
Prize, has the particular appeal of a good 
man who has not coveted or courted 
laurels. It comes as little surprise that he 
has written poetry that is said to be laced 
with dry and even bitter humor. When his 
book. “Always a Reckoning,” is pub- 
lished in January, he will be the third 
president to publish verse. The others 
were Adams and Abraham Lincoln. That 
Is good company for our most useful and 
perhaps most versatile former president. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


End of a Broadcast Ban 


Prime Minister John Major of Britain 
journeyed to Northern Ireland on Friday 
to reassure citizens about his hopes for the 
continuation of the recent cease-fire and 
his pledge that no political changes in the 
status of the province will be made without 
the consent of its citizens by referendum. 
In the course of his statement, he touched 
on another matter that has been, an irritant 
not only to Irish nationalists but to civil 
libertarians everywhere. He referred to 
broadcast restrictions issued by the 
Thatcher government in 1988 that banned 
from the airwaves the voices of individuals 
affilia ted with certain named organiza- 
tions. Those affected included not ooly 
members of the IRA and the Ulster De- 
fense Forces but elected officials, includ- 
ing the Sinn Fein leader, Gerry Adams, 
who was at the time a member of the 
British Par liament- The regulations also 
prohibited the broadcast of “statements 
by any person, which support or invite 


ed persons seeking to explain the motives 
or grievances of those opponents. 


In practice, the BBC and the indepen- 
snt broadcasting network adjusted to the 


support for these organizations." 
The ban, imposed by the go 


The ban, imposed by the government 
“to stop supporters of terrorist organiza- 
tions mom using television and radio to 
justify violence” was difficult for Ameri- 
cans, used to freewheeling and uncensored 
debate on any public issue, to understand. 
Moreover, it was frankly counterproduc- 
tive, for it fostered an image of a great 
nation afraid to hear the words of oppo- 
nents or even the statements of unaffiliat- 


dent broadcasting network adjusted to the 
ban by substituting the voices of actors for 
the actual voices of people speaking. The 
result on television was like watching a 
dubbed foreign movie with all the back- 
ground noises eliminated, all the inflec- 
tions of the speaker — including enthusi- 
asm, sarcasm and emphasis — deleted, 
leaving a flat, hollow sound unlikely to 
provoke interest or emotional reaction in 
die viewer. Live broadcasts of interviews, 
of course, became impossible. 

The trouble with this kind of censor- 
ship, especially when it is applied to elect- 
ed officials and others who have never 
been a part of a terrorist organization, is 
that it adds to the sense of grievance that is 
used to justify violence. The restrictions 
never made sense, but surely now, in a time 
of hope and reconciliation, Mr. Major is 
right to say they serve no purpose at alL 

As a first step to mark the end of 
censorship, the prime minister has chal- 
lenged the former adversaries on both 
sides to use their newly regained voices to 
affirm their commitment to peace. That 
would be a fitting way to end the en- 
forced silence and begin the new era of 
open discussion so necessary to the pres- 
ervation of a free and democratic society. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Comment 


Haiti: into Uncharted Territory 


It is still not certain the United States 
will have to use armed force to oust 
Haiti’s dictators, but it is clear that some 
form and degree of U.S. military pres- 
ence are now inevitable, if only to ensure 
that the transition from military to civil- 
ian rule is as peaceful as possible. This 
necessity is most unfortunate, given the 
history of U.S. military interventions in 
the Caribbean, including an occupation 
of Haiti from 1915 to 1934. That occu- 
pation was far more memorable for its 
length than its accomplishments. 

However, a new U.S. effort to bring 
democracy to a place that has known 
little in its nearly 200 years as a nation 
need not be as futile as the earlier inter- 
vention. If it is as quick and efficient as 
President Clinton and other administra- 
tion officials promise — and if it enjoys 
broad international support, now bong 
marshaled — it could lay the foundation 
for Tumre stability in the Western Hemi- 
sphere's poorest nation. 

— The Las Angeles Times. 


Grenada as though it were Guadalcanal 
From the isolated perch of the presi- 
dency, Mr. Clinton has become a leader 
reviled not only by the Republicans but 
by many liberal Democrats as well He is 
seen as a man who would bargain nearly 
any principle away. From an unworkable 
“don’t ask, don’t telT resolution of the 
issue of gay men and lesbians in the 
military, to the slow erosion of the prom- 
ise of universal health care from all to 
many to some, Mr. Clinton has negotiat- 
ed much and satisfied few. 

With public and political opinion so 
arrayed against intervention, the very 
best result from an invasion would be a 
wash — no gain, no harm. The best case 
is that Haiti, like Grenada, would become 
Bill Clinton’s little war, remembered less 
as an exercise in foreign policy than a 
crisis of self-confidence. 

— The columnist Anna QuincQen 
wriling in The New York Times. 


Certainly there was precious little en- 
lightenment in the president's speech 
Thursday night on why America could 
see its way clear to invade Haiti. With a 
listlessness at odds with his usual side- 
walk-preacher oratorical style. Bill Clin- 
ton couldn’t drum up one compelling 
reason that a tiny nation whose econo- 
my is in shambles and whose military is 
a shadow of America’s posed a risk to 
national security. He was reduced to 
quoting George Bush and referring to 


President Clinton has no reason to be 
confident that the aftermath of a Hai- 
tian invasion will be trouble-free. Nor 
can he be sure that if he persists in a 
venture he concedes is unpopular that 
Congress will appropriate the resources 
needed to push the Haiti intervention to 
a successful conclusion. So Mr. Clinton 
is off into uncharted territory without 


having made the case that an emergency 
exists. Even his contention that U.S. 
credibility is at stake is undermined by 
the fact that he created the credibility 
problem with needless and repeated 
bluster in the first place. 

— The Baltimore Sun. 


N EW YORK — If the United States is 
the cavalry on its way to rescue the 
Haitian people fiom their internal oppres- 
sors, it's a cavalry that is approaching its 
destination on the slowest, most sluggish 
horses imaginable. From the beginning 
President Bill Clinton’s response to events 
in Haiti has been a kind of wacky, stum- 
bling, indecisive, mixed-signal, no-policy 
policy that ultimately can make people cra- 
zy and get people killed. 

’ Mr. Clinton bounces indiscriminately 
and sometimes farcically from one option 
to another. Is it a cruel hoax or smart 
politics to lock up the refugees? Do we 
support the Reverend Jean- Bertrand Aris- 
tide as the embodiment of democracy or 


By Bob Herbert 


revived, and whether it was ever the intention 
of the alleged rescuers to save it 
Father Aristide was elected president in 
December 1990 in balloting that was certi- 
fied as free and fair by international observ- 
ers. The election was an enormous step 


forward for a poverty-ridden, misery-laden 
people who had suffered under a succession 


trash him as an unstab le, homicidal mysti- 
cal malcontent? Should we impose an'em- 
bargo? A real one? I tell you what, we’re 
going in, we’re going in, we’re going in — 
no, wait Where’s Jimmy Carter? Can he go 
down and talk to these guys? 

Democracy was never very healthy, never 
robust in the noxious environs of the west- 
ern half of the island of Hispaniola. But 
under the inchoate guidance of Father Aris- 
tide it stood a fighting chance. If the will of 


the people counted for anything, there was 
still a chance even after Father Aristide was 
ousted by thugs at gunpoint three years ago. 

A U.S. rescue mission was needed. But the 
cavalry took its own sweet time, meandering 
while Haiti burned. Now there are very real 
questions about whether democracy can be 


people who had suffered under a succession 
of tyrants, most of whom ruled with the 
overt or covert support of government and 
business interests in the United States. 

(The long and loathsome role America 
played in the exploitation of the Haitian 
people is a point that should be considered by 
those who persist in asking what interest we 
have in standing up for democracy there.) 

In the period leading up to Father Aristi- 
de’s election, and in the eight months that be 
ran the country, Haiti underwent a remark- 
able change. A constitution was established 
and a parliament elected. Feasant coopera- 
tives were formed and literacy programs 
developed The power of the terrorist Ton- 
tons Macoutes was broken and human 
rights violations plummeted The flow of 
refugees to the United States ceased 

Even former Vice President Dan Quayle, 
who later would become a loud critic of 
Father Aristide, seemed impressed at the 
time. In August 1991, he said: “With only 
six months in office. President Aristide's 
government has undertaken serious and 


profound reform measures in the public 
administration and in economic policy." 

Less than two months later, Father Aris- 
tide was run out of the country and the 
thugs began their horrible and tragic work 
of destroying the fragile democratic infra- 
structure that had been so painstakingly 
pieced together. Their technique was sim- 
ple: brutalize the populace into submission. 

The United States could have rescued the 
forces of democracy in Haiti at any time, 
but the p oliticians insisted that America had 
no real interests there. All America really 
cared about was keeping the desperate refu- 
gees from sullying its shores. So the thugs 
were left free to rampage. 

They crushed all political and civic ac- 
tivity. They deliberately reversed efforts to 
salvage the country's deteriorating physi- 
cal environment They destroyed grain si- 
los and other peasant initiatives. They re- 
instated systematic terror as the chief tool 
of the government They ousted human 


rights monitors. They murdered, raped and 
pillaged with impunity. 

The United States prides itself on being the 
staunchest defender of democracy the worid 
has ever known. Nevertheless, it has consis- 
tently undermined the stru gg le to move to- 
ward freedom and democracy in Haiti. 

If President Clinton is finally to be be- 
lieved, that shameful pattern Is about to 
change. The hope for those who care about 
the Haitian people is that it isn’t too late. 

The New York Times. 


The Risks 
Mount Up 
For Clinton 


/rm 

/ tim e, 

( i-fs 

.sa&us 




By Peter W. Rodman 


fASHINGTON — Presi- 


dent Bill Clinton has dis- 


patched U.S. troops toward 
Haiti, ready to ensure a transi- 


Haiti. ready to ensure a transi- 
tion to democracy. Like many of 
his predecessors of both parties, 
Mr. Clinton has asserted his au- 
thority under the constitution to 
begin such an operation without 
formal congressional approval 

It is striking that in his Thurs- 
day address Mr. Clinton men- 
tioned the United Nations sever- 
al times, and the U.S. Congress 
not at alL It is paradoxical not to 
say amusing, to see Democratic 
congressional leaders — who de- 
veloped the war powers contro- 
versy into an operatic art form 
when Republicans sal in the Oval 
Office — squirming uneasily in 
the face of Mr. Groton's bald 
assertion of unilateral authority. 

Three decades of experience 
with executive-congressional 
wrangling give us some clues 
about what is likely to happen 
nexL The precedents suggest 
that intervention in Haiti will 
leave Mr. Clinton quite exposed. 
If the operation is quick and 
successful congressional agita- 
tion will probably not reach the 
level of a serious political chal- 
lenge. But if U.S. forces should 
find themselves mired down, 
then public and congressional 
tolerance will evaporate. 

The analogies invoked will 
then be Lebanon and Somalia, if 
not Vietnam. And the presi- 
dent’s political position and 
ability to stay the course will 
suffer from the absence of for- 
mal congressional backing. 

Congress passed the War 
Powers Resolution in November 
1973. It was the centerpiece of 
the congressional challenge to 
presidential power during the 
era of Vietnam and Watergate. 
Its passage had great symbolic 
importance as a blow against Lhe 
“imperial presidency." Indeed, 
it was passed over President 
Richard Nixon’s veto. 

But that veto deprived the res- 
olution of some of the legitima- 
cy its architects sought They 
had hoped that a “compact” 





By CHAPFATTE. C*W SJmfinat 


agreed upon between a presi- 
dent and Congress would have a 
legal political and moral effect 
Mr. Nixon saw it as unconstitu- 
tional — as have all his succes- 
sors. Democrat and Republican. 

One irony of the War Powers 
Resolution is that it was based 
on a myth. Ii was supposed to 
prevent a repetition of Ameri- 
ca’s involvement in Vietnam. 
Yet even if it had been in force 
in the 1960s, the country’s entry 


Intervention in Haiti 
could leave the president 
quite exposed. 


into Vietnam would almost cer- 
tainly have happened anyway, 
since the intervention had con- 
siderable congressional and 
public support when it began. 

Retrospe cti vely, critics of the 
war put all the blame on execu- 
tive overreaching, forgetting the 
degree of support from Con- 
gress and the public. Mr. John- 
son’s real problem was the con- 
text of the Gulf of Tonkin 
Resolution, which came in 1964 
after a few limited U.S. retalia- 
tory air strikes. While its lan- 
guage authorizing armed force 
was broader, hardly anyone in 
Congress imagined it was a 
vote for a ground war and half 
a million combat troops. Thus 
the resolution was inadequate 
as a political safety net when 
the war expanded and became 
unpopular. A resolution passed 
in early 1965, when the major 
U.S. air and ground war began. 


would have provided better cover. 

A second irony is that since 
1973. presidents have managed 
to carve out considerable free- 
dom of action. Consider Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan's quick mil- 
itary strikes against Grenada in 
1983 and Libya in 1986; Presi- 
dent George Bush's operation 
against Manuel Noriega in Pana- 
ma in 1989, and Mr. Ginton’s 
limited air strike against Iraq in 
1993. All showed that presidents 
— if their actions are judged suc- 
cessful — can still act unilaterally 
in small-scale operations as com- 
mander in chief and are not nec- 
essarily hobbled by Congress. 

in none of these cases did 
Congress invoke the War Pow- 
ers Resolution to block or limit 
presidential action. This was ei- 
ther because the action was pop- 
ular or because the risks seemed 
low and the strategic case was 
broadly accepted. The resolu- 


tion in its precise terms proved 
p raced urally unworkable. 

Yet at the same time, there 
can be no doubt of the limits of 
presidential freedom of action. 
Therein lie the historical lessons 
for Mr. Clinton. 

Mr. Reagan's Lebanon inter- 
vention in 1983-84, when the 
United States and three Europe- 
an allies sent forces to Beirut 
and they became caught up in 
the Syrian assault on the Leba- 
nese government, led Congress 
to assert its role and pass a reso- 
lution granting the president 
only 18 months’ authorization 
to continue the deployment. Mr. 
Reagan denied he needed au- 
thorization but acceded to the 
bill anyway, for fear of a cutoff 


of funds. Within less than four 
months, after the bombing of 
the Marine barracks in Beirut 
renewed congressional agitation 
forced him out of Lebanon. 

In January 1991. as Mr. Bush 
contemplated Operation Desert 
Storm against Saddam Hussein, 
both houses of Congress debat- 
ed and passed resolutions of au- 
thorization. Mr. Bush denied 
that he needed such approval 
But the congressional votes of 
support averted a monumental 
constitutional crisis that would 
have ensued if the president had 
launched a full-stale war over 
either house’s disapproval. 

Mr. Clinton's tentative com- 
mitments of force in Somalia. 
Haiti and Bosnia in 1993, in pur- 
suit of objectives that woe not 
dear to the public, led to a wave 
of war powers resolutions in 
Congress that were beaten back 
only because Mr. Clinton backed 
away from the operations: 

History suggests that Mr. Clin- 
ton is compounding his military 
risks in Haiti with the risk that 
his political situation at home 
will quickly unravel if the opera- 
tion runs into difficulty. And if 
such difficulty arises, the unrav- 
eling of his domestic situation 
will deny him the staying power 
he needs to complete the enter- 
prise successfully in Haiti. 


Peter Rodman, a former 
White House and State Depart- 
ment official, is author of the 
forthcoming “More Precious 
Than Peace : The Cold War and 
the Struggle for the Developing 
Worid. n He contributed ttus com- 
ment to The New York Times. 


When the Going Gets Tough, Put Everybody in Jail 


B OSTON — In apartheid 
South Africa, at times when 


U South Africa, at times when 
political prisoners were subjected 
to harsh treatment, they were still 
allowed to earn university degrees 
by correspondence. For the U.S. 
Congress in 1994, that idea is too 
enlightened. One section of the 
omnibus crime bill just signed by 
President Clinton forbids the 
awarding of Pell grants for higher 
education to anyone in prison. 
That will just about aid the possi- 
bility of prisoners, who are most- 


By Anthony Lewis 


ly poor, earning college credits. 
Is that provision of the bill , 


International Herald Tribune 

ESTABLISHED ISS7 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Ci’-Chairmen 

RICHARD McCLEAN, Publisher & Chief Euraaive 
JOHN VINOCUR. Executive EEtar & VkePresBaii 

• WALTER WELLS. Ainu fifiw • SAMUEL ABT. KATHERINE KNORR and 
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Is that provision of the bill a 
blow against crime? To the con- 
trary. Studies show that prison- 
ers who do college work are less 
than half as likely as other in- 
mates to commit new crimes af- 
ter their release. 

No, Congress inserted the pro- 
vision to show the public how 
“tough” it could be — how 
mean, how nasty. The realities of 
fighting crime had nothing to do 
with it — or with many other 
parts of the crime bill 

Consider what the bill does 
about mandatory minimum sen- 
tences. which prison officials and 
judges and other experts regard 
as a distorting and self-defeating 
trend in American law. 

Congress in recent years has 
fixed minimum sentences for 
many drag offenses. Judges have 
lost their right to consider the par- 
ticular facts of the crime and the 


V /W/. bwmmm.il fh-ni!,l Tnhmc. All rigftimenrd. ESN: flUM-RPR 1 


offender. They are required to put 
many nonviolent, first-time drag 
offenders away for 5 or 10 years. 


More than 100,000 new drag 
offenders are being committed to 
state and federal prisons every 
year. The result is overcrowding of 
those prisons. Some states solve 
the problem by releasing other 
prisoners — including those the 
public rightly fears most, men who 
committed violent crimes. 

The new bill moves to lengthen 
state prison toms as well It does 
so by offering states large sums to 
build new prisons, but only if they 
promise to make serious offenders 
save at least 85 percent of their 
sentences. Most states now release 
prisoners after they serve a far 
smaller portion of their sentences. 
To get the federal money the slates 
will have to make their prisons 
even more overcrowded. 

As the crime bill first came out 
of a Senate-House conference, it 
had a provision exempting nonvi- 
olent drug offenders who cooper- 
ated with the prosecution for 
mandatory sentences — and ap- 
plying that exemption to similar 
offenders already in prison. 

A freshman Republican con- 
gressman from New York, Rick 
Lazio, demanded elimination of 
the retroactive clause. To get his 
vote for letting the bill come to 
the floor, the Democrats gave 
way to him. As a result, someone 
who sold a small amount of crack 
last year may be in a penitentiary 
for 10 years while someone newly 
convicted serves 2 years. 

These are small examples of be- 


nighted provisions that make this 
crime biu not just a flawed but a 
wrong-beaded piece of legislation. 
Others can be briefly indicated. 

Representative Susan Molinari, 
Republican of New York, got into 
the bill a section allowing federal 
prosecutors to disclose at the trial 
of sex crimes the fact that the 
defendant was previously charged 
(not convicted) with a sexual of- 
fense, civil or crimmal. no matter 
how long ago. So someone falsely 
accused — and that does happen 
— would be branded. 

Another provision narrows 
the circumstances in which fed- 
eral courts can find that condi- 
tions in a prison are cruel and 
unusual, in violation of the con- 
stitution. Another waters down 
the present rule against exeeut- 



ill'r 1 


An Accord 
The World 


Can Honor 


By Stephen S. Roeenfeld 


W ashington — first > 

bow to the Egyptian gp* 


W bow to the Egyptian gp* 
eminent. It kept Islamic tcrroris^ 
fmm onetime the bU UN popula- 


tion conference in Cairo. i netxa^ 

rents that in certain circum* 
stances nurse extremism* 
including rampant populate® 
growth, no doubt still run. Butin 
this conspicuous instance* some 
mix erf deterrence by the authori- 
ties and discretion by the ievota- 
paid off in a handsome 
boost of prestige for the regime. 

Then a second bow to th at 
dumping ground of desperate 
hopes known as “the United Rar- 
tiOTS.” Only under UN auspices 
could such a forum have been 
organized, such a sprawling topic 
as population and development 
t eed up and such a striking degree 
of agreement obtained. 

And a third nod to the Groto n 
administration. It brought the 
U.S. government abreast of the 
advanced line of the many non- 
governmental sources that create 
national consciousness on an i s sue 
ffiw this one. This in turn enabled 
it to exercise global leadership in a 
policy realm that lacks the high 
political stakes of a fight over, for 
instance , Haiti or Cuba, but that 
can deliver rewards, in social 'im- 
provement and global stability. 

Cairo’s accomp lishment Hes in 
the essential chemistry of social 
change: converting a slowly won 


new expert consensus on popula- 
tion ana development into a virtu- 
ally worldwide political consensus. 
Advocates return to battle in their 
own countries on an agenda that 
diminishes the okf emphasis on 
reducing birth numbers by family 
planning and assigns new weight 
to a developmental approach to 

women’s rights and health. 

It will occur to some that an 
international bandwagon has 
formed and that it is m akin g a 
wmhli! on nothing less than die 
fixture of humanity. Set aside, as 
Cano pretty much did, the objec- 
tions of the Vatican and others to 
the moral pings of the new agenda. 
You are left with international em- 
brace of the largest calculated act 
of social engineering in history. 

This prospect puts a responsi- 
bility on the official and intellectu- 
al keepers of the new doctrine. On 
the dunce — and surely there is 
one — that they are wrong, they 
must keep an open mind. I’m not 
quite sure bow this is done; it's not 
as though you can just get off at 
the next freeway exit and double 
Back: But it wifi be important to 
bear out dissenters with a different 
notion of the connection between 
birth rates and human resources or 
with other programmatic ideas. 

You can say that the Cairo con- 
ference came in the nick of time, 
and not only for the places where 
population and development are 
painfully out of whack- Since the 
Cold War ended. U.S. policy has 
straggled with the no longer con- 
testable fact that global instabil- 
ity is a lot more than an imported 
communist disease; it is an intrin- 
sic condition. Democracy and the 
free market have been tested as 
rescue vehicles and have their un- 
disputed continuing part But 
they leave an evident gap, and the 
newly sanctioned strategy fills it. 

Not that broad gauge women- 
oriented programs are magic. 
Like most “programs,” they are 
often government programs vul- 
nerable in their implementation 
to the very governmental weak- 
nesses that contribute to the 
problem in the first place. Bui 
they have a special appeal. To 
offer women more control over 
their own families, careers and 
destinies: This is the most digni- 
fied and the least coercive form of 
social enejneerine. 


mates in American prisons has 
quadrupled. The United States 
has passed South Africa for the 
title of most prisoners per capita 
in the world. None of tins has had 
a measurable effect on America’s 
high level of crime: But the U.S. 
government has decided, as The 
Economist magazine put it, “to 
take this failed approach to crime 
policy and extend it.” 

The New York Tones. 


For the overall costs of these 
programs, put at $17 billion a 
year, the poor countries are 
meant to ante up two-thirds and 
the rich countries one-third. Pre- 
sumably, most of it will be old 
money redistributed within 
health budgets, national budgets 
and international aid budgets. 
But the Cairo mandate should be 
useful in helping spring new mon- 
ey, too. I think that most of us, 
asked what we would most like to 
see the government spend on 
overseas, would say without a 
pause; population. 

The Washington Post. 


BS OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 

1894: Bivalve Thieves S.*??” 1 ® 11 frontier and then 


mg people who are so mentally 
ill that they cannot understand 


PARIS — Stealing is a fine art in 
Paris and is studied in all its 
branches. As if by tacit consent, 
the criminal class take up certain 
specialties. Not to be torgotten 
are the oyster thieves, who mon- 


ths German frontier and then 
immediately shot. According to 
the terms oi the order, every Pol- 
ish soldier who crossed the fron- 
tier of Silesia or the demarcation 
line in Poznan was to be consid- 
ered a franc tireur. 


[ii:! i.ii'i**' 


OK'^Usi'. SN 




^ J i^St» •? 


- - 

K *-'*#* 


>i v . 


ill that they cannot understand 
the proceedings against them. 

The better-known provisions of 
the crime bill, such as “three 
strikes, you’re out,” have their own 
flaws. How did such a misbegotten 
piece of legislation become law? 

The answer is ample: politics. 
Democrats wanted to take the 
crime i$$ue away from Republi- 


age to spirit away the luscious 
la valves from the merchants, in 


bivalves from the merchants, in 
spite of toe stones and heavy 
weights attached to the baskets. 
Latterly Monmartre has suffered 
particularly in this direction. 


1944: MacArthur Named K 


Snlfi* 


1919: New German Plot? 


WARSAW — Polish newspapers 
daim that they have discovered a 


cans. Republicans responded by new German plot in Upper Sile- 
sounding “tougher.” The Justice sia. They publish the full text of 
Department did not work effec- an order issued by the Prussian 


tivdy against the worst features 
because President Clinton want- 
ed something — anything — la- 
beled “crime bfll” 

Since 1970 the number of in- 


War Office in Berlin dated July 

no tain ; • / 


28, 1919, giving instructions to 
the German nmiiarY authorities 


the German nmiiaiy authorities 
in Kolberg that Polish soldiers 
are to be enticed into crossing 


CHICAGO — [From our New 
York edition:] The American Le- 
gion and the nation received to- 
“?y 18] from Admiral 

Chester W. Nimitz, commander 
in chirf of the Pacific Fleet, the 
revelation that General Douglas 
MacArthur will lead the forth- 
invasion of the Phflip- 
pmes. From General George G 
MarshaU, Army Chief of Staff, 
came the solemn warning that, 
unto war now in its crucial stage, 
bickering among the Allied na- 
tions over their post-war rights 
must not be permitted to “delay 
toe armistice or sully victory.” 




- :*'» . r,j <H 




r 4 


u fit « 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 1994 


Page 7 


Aha 


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With this page on Germany, the IHTs 
restaurant critic, Patricia Wells, continues 
to raze the world's top restaurants, and to 
compile a list of the Top 10 restaurants 
around the world, and the Top 10 more 
casual and affordable restaurants. Next 
month, , she will report from Italy. If you 
would like to share your favorite finds with 
Patricia Wells, please write her at the IHT. 


The Top Tables 


true 

W! 


i,j 


•■•!•: ' 


i 


\N \S 


• No- 1: Scfa w arz ui ldstnbe, in Kur & 
Sporthotd Traube Tonbach, Tonbach- 
strasse 237, Baiersbronn, tel : (7442) 49-26- 
65. 

• No. 2a Le Gourmet, Hartmannstrasse 
8. Munich, tel: (39) 2-12-09-05. 

• No. 3: Restaurant Dieter Muller, 
SchJossholel Lcrbach, - Lerbacher Weg, 
Bergiscb-dadbach, tel: (2202) 20-40. 

International Herald Tribune 

HATS to be found on a south- 
to-north gastronomic tour of 
Germany? A fertile green land 
where every potato you eat, no 
matter how modest the establis hm e n t, tastes 
as though it has just been pulled horn the 
earth. Inspiring chefs, who turn out ethereal 
mousses and shiny sauces, bring new honor 
to the art of gelatin-making, remind us of 
the luxurious splen- 
dor of brioche. 

Many of the chefs 
who are at the top of 
their profession began 
their careers in the 
nouveUe ciriane days 
of the 1970s. French 
cooking is certainly 
their main inspira- 
tion, but from there, the chefs weave their 
own magic. 

. And magic it was at the table of Harald 
Wohlfahrt, deep in the Black Forest, at the 
small, sun-fiBed Restaurant Scbwarzwald- 


PATRICIA 

WELLS 


* 


stube. The restaurant was elevated to the 
top Michelin three-star rating in 1992, af- 
ter having held on to two stars for die 
previous 12 years. 

Wohlfahrt displays a sense of perfec- 
tion, technique and maturity, as well as 
pure and clean style. Even from a dis- 
tance, as I eyed the appetizer-quiche com- 
ing toward me, I knew I was in for a bite of 
perfection: flawless pastry, a feather-light, 
fluffy quiche flecked with the rich flavors 
of ham, leeks and cream. 

Surprises arrive at a measured pace, and 
soon we’re served a showstopping terrine 
of monkfish — alabaster-white, edged in 
dear gelatin, a burst of flavor, texture, 
mouth-filling pleasure. Quail breast is 
smothered in a rich quail “souffle,” paired 
with a salad of green beans and mush- 
rooms in a pine-nut-oil vinaigrette. Wohl- 
fahrt encases turbot and langous lines in 
flaky phyllo dough, laced in a light saffron 
sauce, and serves basmati rice alongside. 

But the finest taste of the day, and of the 
trip, came in a simple John Dory (Peiers- 
fisqh) enveloped in paper-thin slices of 
exquisite German bacon, and panfried to a 
delicate crispness. Served in a pool of 
creamy horseradish sauce, in which float- 
ed rounds of lightly pickled beets, it made 
me feel I had all of Germany wrapped up 
in a few well-flavored bites. 

My favorite wine on the Schwartzwald- 
s tube’s list is an Alsatian riesling, L&on 
Beyer’s 1990Cuvfce Parti culi fere, an apple- 
like, fragrant wine that’s dry and adapt- 
able to just about anything Chef WohE 
fahrt can dish out. 

His elegance and attention to detail fol- 
lowed through to dessert, with a composi- 
tion of red fruits and peaches in a delight- 
ful champagne ice cream, and a golden 
soufflfe-Kke pancake, sweet and crunchy, 
studded with fresh blackberries. 

Closed Monday and Tuesday, Jan. 9 to 
31, July 31 to Aug 22. Credit cards: Ameri- 
can Express, Eurocard, Diners Club, Visa. 
Menus from 155 to 195 Deutsche marks 
(S 100 to $125). A la cane, 100 to 120 DM, 
including service but not wine. 


In my view, Munich’s Otto Koch is 
Germany’s ideal chef and merits far more 
than his single Michelin star. He’s modest, 
energetic, creative and totally in tune with 
what’s good about German ingredients. 
As a chef. Koch displays a rare sensitivity 
and a closeness to his Bavarian roots. 

At the elegant, upstairs dining room of 
Le Gourmet, he offers a taste of both 
modern and updated-rustic fare. One 
weekday afternoon he served a veritable 
symphony of country-inspired dishes. 

He begins with a single, decisive flavor: 
a fresh boned sardine panfried to a crisp, 
then served with a soothing yogurt herb 
sauce and a tangle of greens. Next a liny 
terrine of pig tails, just one emphatic bite, 
all fatty, crunchy and dense in texture, 
twinned with another teeny salad dressed 
with a Bavarian specially, an opulent 
pumpkin-seed oil. 

As a nod to wurslland, Koch offers 
miniature seafood sausages on a bed of 
cabbage, the crisp vegetable bathed with 
butter and mustard. 

All this is a mere overture to Koch's 
pifece de resistance. Bone marrow lovers 
take note: He scoops out marrow bones, 
slices them horizontally, then fills them 
with a nutmeg-seasoned potato purfec. On 
top go thin, crisp rounds of marrow, em- 
bellished with chives and plenty of freshly 
ground black pepper. 

Later, a multilayered mushroom “cake,” 
thin layers of crepes inlerlayered with a 
rich, enthusiastic wild-mushroom puree, 
arrives as an interlude. 

Le Gourmet's wine offerings are exten- 
sive (wine lovers should request a tour of the 
cellars). A white well worth sampling is the 
small-production Grauerb urgu nder. pro- 
duced by Kari-Heinz Johner. which goes 
particularly well with food, something you 
can't say of all German wines, even some of 
the best. For red, opt for the beny-ricb 
Bavarian spaiburgunder. made from pinot 
noir. From Rudolf Fflrst's vineyards in 
Bdrgstadt, the 1 990 is comparable to a well- 
made French Burgundy, fine in fntit. light, 
but with a bit of body. 


Take a deep breath, then order a platter 
of Bavarian cheeses — all quite delicate yet 
intense in flavor — some goat, some sheep, 
some cow, some a mix. sprinkled with 
herbs or noL As a closer, sample his superb 
homemade liqueur, Le Gourmeuf. haunt- 
ing with orange and juniper. 

Closed Sunday and Monday. Menus from 
150 to 200 DM; a la carte. 90 to 200 DM. 
including service but not wine. 

Germany's embarrassment of riches 
continues with Dieter Miiller. newly in- 
stalled near Cologne at the luxurious ium- 
of-the-cemuiy Schlosshotel Lerbach. The 
dining room at Restaurant Dieter Muller 
is fashioned out of a bright and airy winter 
garden overlooking a rose garden and Ital-' 
ianale ruins. 

Mailer recently spent a year Lravding 
around the world absorbing the cuisines of 
other lands. As he states. Escoffier re- 
mains his greatest inspiration, and your 
palate will recognize the source. Muller’s 
food is complicated, but not so much that 
you don’t recognize what’s on your plate. 

His best dish is a complex weaving of 
flavors, textures, colors, a pairing of sauteed 
goose foie gras on a bed of sliced, marinated 


pumpkin and pumpkin seeds. He adds to 
the palette a soft, herb-filled ravioli and 
shavings of summer truffles. 

Smoked eel is fashioned into a terrine 
surrounded with fresh cucumber cream: 
smoked halibut is turned into a silken 
sheer mousse: sorrel soup is dotted with 
cubes of fresh salmon, and a riesling sauce 
serves as backdrop for pike perch and 
salmon fillets wrapped in spinach leaves. 

But I confess total weakness for his 
champagne ice cream — a treasure that’s 
prepared without cream, but rather with 
butter and an avalanche of eggs. Yet cham- 
pagne’s distinctive flavor shines through. 

German wine novices will be well taken 
care of here, as the sommelier, Petra 
Bader, shares her passion for her native 
wines. A red to sample is the El Flammis 
Orior. made from a blend of lemberger. 
pinot noir and samtroL a light and fruity 
red that pairs well with lamb and other 
delicate meats. 

Closed Sunday and Monday. Credit 
cards: American Express, Eurocard. Diners 
Club, Visa. Menus from 143 to 198 DM; a la 
cane. 120 to 150 DM. including service but 
not wine. 


The following is an evolving list of the 10 
best restaurants in the world and the 10 best 
casual restaurants, based on reporting so far. 
The list includes reviews on Hong Kong, 
Tokyo, the United Slates. France, the Bene- 
lux countries, Spain, Britain. Switzerland 
and Germany. 

The Top Tables 

• No. 1: Jo& Robucbon, 59 Avenue Ray- 
mond- Poincare, Paris 16, tel: 47-22-12-2?. 

• No. 2: Restaurant Fredy Girardet, 1 
Route d’Yverdon. Crissier (6 kilometers 
west of Lausanne). Switzerland, tel: (21) 
634-0505. 

• No. 3: Lai Gang Heen, The Regent. 
Salisbury Road, Hong Kong, tel: 721-1211. 

• No. 4: Le Loins XV-AIain Ducasse, Ho- 
ld de Paris, Place du Casino. Monte Carlo, 
Monaco, let 92-16-30-01. 

• No. 5: Ki-Cho (Kitcho), Chuo-ku, Gin- 
za 1-1 1-2, Hotel Sdyo (Bl. basement). To- 
kyo. let 3535-1177. 

• No. 6: Jinx, Chuo-ku. G inza 4-2-15. 
Tsukamoio Sozan Building (Bl. basement), 
Tokyo, tel: 3535-3600. 

• No. 7: Cirv Savoy, IS Rue Trovon, Par- 
is 17, tei 43-80-40-61. 

• No. 8: TaiUevent, 15 Rue Lam ennais. 
Paris & tel: 45-63-964)1 and 45-61-12-90. 

• No. 9: Restaurant Daniel, 20 East 76th 
Street, New York, tel: (212) 288-0033. 

• No. 10: Scbwaizivaldstube, in Kur & 
Sporthotel Traube Tonbach. Tonbach- 
strasse 237. Baiersbronn, Germany, tel: 
(7442) 49-26-65. 

Casual Dining 

• No. 1: Al Forno, 577 South Main 
Street. Providence. Rhode Island, tel: (401) 
273-9767. 

• No. 2: La Tuptna, 6 Porte de ta Mon- 
naie, Bordeaux, tel: 50-91-56-37. 

• No. 3: Front era GriU. 445 North Clark 
Street, Chicago, tel: (312) 661-1434. 

• No. 4: Gty Chiu Chonv Restaurant, East 
Ocean Centre, 98 Granville Road. Tsim Sha 
Tsui East. Kowloon. Hong Kong, tel: 725- 
6226. 

• No. 5: Ca rhadre. Les Flors 12, Barce- 
lona; tel: 441-1139. 

• No. 6: The Seafood Restaurant, River- 
side. Padstow, Cornwall PL28 8BY. Eng- 
land, tel: (841) 532-485. 

• No. 7: Viridiana, Juan de Mena 14. Ma- 
drid, tel: 523-4478. 

• No. 8: Le Camfefeon, 6 Rue de Chev- 
reuse, Paris 6, tel: 43-20-63-43. 

• No. 9: Kifer Schanke, Prinzregenien- 
strasse 73, Munich, tel: (89) 4-16-82-47. 

• No. 10: Schwaizwiilder. Hartmann- 
strasse 8. Munich, tel: (89) 2-12-09-79. 


CASUAL DINING 


T 


TIPS 


v-n‘- 


G 


Insemasianal Herald Tribune 

ERMANY offers an abun- 
. dance of high-quality restau- 
rants, many of which are 
scarcely known beyond the 
coun try’s borders. Here is a list of some 
additional worthy contenders, with the 
best dishes sampled at each: 

Wald & Schlosshotel Friedrfchsnihe, 
Friedrich sruhe, near Ohringen, tel: 
(7941) 6-08-70. For chef Loihar Eter- 
m arm ’s showstopping molded kugelhppf 
erf goose liver with glazed apple slic« 
and warm brioche, sorrel soup with 


salmon schnitzel, and stuffed rabbit with 
herb brioche. 

Tantris, Jobann-Fichte-Strasse 7, Mu- 
nich, ret (89) 36-20-61. For one of the 
world’s liveliest sommeliers, Paula 
Bosch, and chef Hans Haas’s calf's head 
with tomatoes and basil, pigeon roasted 
in a nest of artichokes, and raspberry 
gratin in white wine ice cream. 

Zur Traube, Bahnstrasse 47, Greven- 
broich, teL (2181) 6-87-67. For Elvira 
Kanfmann’s superlative service and Diet- 
er Kaufrnann’s ethereal sturgeon parfait 
with beluga caviar and complexly fla- 


vored goose foie gras tourte with grape 
preserves. 

Hotel Restaurant Schweizer Stuben, 
Geisel brunn en weg 11, Wertheim-Bet- 
tingen. tel: (9342) 30-70. For chef Fritz 
Schilling's cold potato soup with truffles, 
baby goat with varied beans and cheese 
polenta, and plum tart. 

Resdenz Heinz Winkler, Kirchplatz 1, 
Aschau im Chiemgau, tel: (8052) 1-79- 
90. For his warm smoked eel with cu- 
cumbers and potatoes, homemade noo- 
dles in Roquefort sauce, sauteed wild 
mushrooms with herbs, and wild berries 
with red wine ice cream. 


• No. 1: Kafer Schanke, Prinzregenten- 
strasse 75. Munich, tel: (89) 4-16-82-47. 

• No. 2: SchwarzwSIder, H art man n- 
strasse 8. Munich, tel: (89) 2-12-09-79. 

• No. 3: Paffgen, Friesensirasse 64-66. 
Cologne, tel: (221) 13-54-61. 

I ruemai tonal Herald Tribune 

HE upper floors of one of Mu- 
nich's foremost gourmet shops 
and caterers harbors one of Ger- 
many's better casual dinin g spots. 
Kifer Schanke, a place where the menu 
ranges from a simple green salad to caviar- 
topped salmon “carpaccio” to a platter of 
cheeses served with delicious fresh and 
nutty German butler. 

Our lunch displayed great variety and 
understated creativity, beginning with a del- 
icate crepe filled with layers of moist 
smoked salmon, caviar and salmon eggs 
rolled in a neat bundle and served with a 
shocking pink, yet harmonious, sauce of red 
beets and cream. A middle course of cray- 
fish tails in a delicate bouillon showered 
with a dose of fresh thyme, dill and parsley, 
saved as a tonic. A main course of tender 
baby lamb chops simmered in broth and 
served with a variety of vegetables was 
equally refreshing; guinea fowl — stuffed 
then rolled and roasted — was expertly 
seasoned, carefully presented, and just as 
satisfying. Only a rather bland turbot roast- 
ed with thin potato scales was disappoint- 
ing. A worthy wine here is the dry, 1992 
MOller- Thurgau Biroauer Kirchbalde. 
which is refreshing, light and versatile. 


Closed Sunday and holidays. Credit cards: 
American Express. Eurocard, Diners Club. 
Visa Menu at 46.50 Deutsche marks ($30), 
including service but not wine; a la carte. 26 to 
70 DM. including service but not wine. 

Munich's Otto Koch strikes again, with 
his 80-year-old Restaurant Schwarzwalder, 
an institution he took over just four years 
ago. The dark wooden booths, heavy chan- 
deliers, stained-glass windows and carved 
wooden beams of this Old World dining 
room create an ideal setting for the tradi- 
tional German fare offered here. 

Almost no one in the world can get me 
to order tripe, much less love it Well, chef 
Koch’s version — with measured doses of 
cream and wild morels — added a convert 
to the fold. Gentle in texture and aroma, 
the dish offers a new definition of tripe. 

An excellent starter is the jellied beef, a 
multilayered creation of thin slices of boiled 
beef inlerlayered with a mix of carrots and 
zucchini, served with a green salad and a 
touch of horseradish. The dish could have 
used a touch more seasoning, and I could 
have used twice as much horseradish, a 
zesty root that deserves greater play. 

With* it all "sample the house riesling — 
the 1992 Diedesf elder Paradies — a light, 
thirst-quenching wine with a pleasant lem- 
ony edge, then ord er a s weet apricot strudel. 

Closed Sunday. Credit cards: American 
Express, Eurocard, Diners Club, Visa Menu 
at 68 DM; a la cane. 42 to 88 DM, including 
service but not wine. 


No doubt about it the Germans know 
their beer. With some 1,400 breweries and 
4.000 different beers, they ought to. Al- 
though there are perhaps dozens of brew- 
ery-beer halls as authentic and satisfying 
as Cologne's PSffgen, I haven’t yet found 
them. Paffgen is a tiny brewery that pro- 
duces KOlsch — a top-fermented beer 
unique to Cologne — solely for its tavern. 
The home brew, served in very thin, tall 
glasses, is pale, with a faintly lactic taste, 
and it's clean and refreshing on the palate. 

The huge, dark beer hall — actually a 
series of halls and a large outdoor terrace 
shaded by a big chestnut tree out back — 
offers everything one dreams of in a tradi- 
tional German menu, in quality, quantity 
and value. Thick white chin a, ocher walls, 
an atmosphere that’s convivial but not 
boisterous make it the sort of place where 
even children in prams are found. 

The herring fillets, hausfrauenan — 
bathed in sour cream, onions and apples — 
are top of the line; the thin , long bock- 
wurst arrives accompanied by one of those 
incomparable German potato salads, ever 
so sweet, ever so sour; the sauerkraut is 
neither too salty, too biller, nor overly 
seasoned, and the hearty portions of sauer- 
brauten — paired with a duet of industrial- 
strength potato dumplings — will keep 
you nourished for days. 

Open daily. No credit cards. A la carte, IS 
to 27 DM. including service but not drinks. 


v. 


Is:- 


t heil* * t;,! 

* tl# -O' ■' 

tmra 1 ' ■' ... 

au* i: ' ' . - 

1»<- 






On October 31st, the IHT will publish a 

Special Report on 

Private 

Banking 

Among the topics to be covered are: 

■ The contrasting management style of 
private bankers In Europe and America. 

■ The boom of private banking in California. 

■ Asia — the promised land for private 
bankers. 

■ Specialized services aimed at retirees. 

■ The growth of real estate services for 
private banking clients. 


contact BiBMahder in Paris 
37 9$ 78. fax (33-1) 46 3750 44. 



niiMi -kb m -*» in 


International 

Classified 

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■ Monday 

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B Tuesday 
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R Wednesday 
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I Thursday 

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■ Friday 

Real Estate Marketplace, Holidays and Travel 
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Plus over 30 0 headings In International Classified 
Monday through Saturday 

For further information, contact Philip Oma in Paris: 
Tel: (33-1) 46 37 94 74 -Fax: (33-1) 46 37 52 12 


' wt If** nun mi MKT 


Culinary Excellence at 
L E CORDON BLEU 


L ’ A r t C u l i n * i r c 
PARIS - i 8 9 i 


i5*23*T 


•Weekly workshops. 
•Daily demonstration.*. 
•Introduction to 
French gastronomy. 
•SUMMER CLASSES: 
September 9th to 30rd 

•CATERING : 

Neu>crnasemjkemteTimeweehfrimNauernberl4thioDetxmberl7tl). 

•The classic Cycle : 

Scurfy cuisine and pastry in 10 week courses 
that begin four times a year. 


PARIS • L O 

NOON - TOKYO 

8 rue Leon De thorn me 

1 1 4 Marylehenr Lane 

75015 Paris 

London WIM6HH 

Phone 33/1 4 8 56 06 06 

Phone 44/71 935 35 03 

Fax 33/1 48 56 03 96 

Fax 44/71 935 76 21 


Call today lor a free school brochure or clft catalogue 
of our gourmet products. USA : 1-S00-457 CHEF 



Ritz-Escoffier 

Ecolede Gastronome Fran^aise 

The Ultimate French Cooking School 

Located in the prestigious Paris Rhz. 

For cooking enthusiasts and professionals. 

One- to 12-week certificate and diploma courses 
in cooking, bread and pastry making, wine and (able service. 

Demonstration classes 

Monday through Thursday from 3 to 5:30 pan. 
Alternate Tuesday evenings 6:30 to 9 pjn. 

Last Saturday each month from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. 
Gift Certificates available, 

AH courses are taught in French and English. 

To receive a 1994 brochure and details of the monthly 
demonstration programs , please call or write: 

Hotel Ritz 

I s. place Venddme. 7504 1 Paris, Cedes 0! . France 
Tel.: (+33 1) 42.60.38.30 - Fax: (+33 I) 40.15.07.65 






















































































NASDAQ NATIONAL 


Consolidated trading for week I ^ ^ i»onon 

ended Friday, Sept i& 

(Continued) 

Sate 

Soda OHr Ykj lOfetflgh Ljemt Ok Owe 



Interim Report Highlights 1994 


Profit after taxation US$1 09.1m + 60% 

Earnings per ordinary share US$5.99 + 50% 

Earnings per ordinary share before 

exceptional item US$4.00 Unchanged 

Dividend per ordinary share US$1 .65 + 6% 

“Dairy Farm has experienced more severe competition in some of its major markets 
but continued to make progress with its international development. While the 
overall result for the year will be enhanced by the exceptional gain recorded in the 
first half, the operating profit is likely to remain at a similar level to 1 993” 


*JT 


(unaudited) 

She months ended 30th June 
1994 1993 

USSm USSm 


Last Week’s Markets 


AW flsurw or* as at daat of tnxBng PrldOY 

Stock Indexes 

United Orta Sept 16 Sent 9 arte 
DJ Indus. 993135 3874*1 +151* 

OJ UHL 17723 17957 — U7* 

DJ Trans. 156633 159154 —150* 

S & P 100 43821 43113 +1.17* 

S8.P500 471.19 448.18 +064* 

S&PInd 55678 55152 +059* 

NYSE CP 29977 2S6J8 +054* 

SrtW 

FTSEIOO 3045.10 31 39 JO —236* 

FT 30 338890 2427*0 — 1*7* 

Japan 

Nikkei 225 197982 9 19897*8 — 051* 


MSCtP 83650 QUO -003% 
wwu&FramMotwSti^aWttin 


Money Rates 


Sent 9 

arte 

United siatei Sept 16 

Sent. 9 

3874*1 

+ 1*1 * 

Discount rata 

4*0 

4*0 

179*7 

— 147% 

Prime rata 

716 

716 

1591*6 

— 1*0% 

Federal funds rata 

4'vw 

4% ' 

43X13 

+ 1.17% 

Japan 



468.18 

5502 

23838 

+ 0*4% 
+ 0*9% 

+ 0*4% 

Discount 

Colt money 

3-montti Interbank 
Gonwun 1 

116 

2*9 

2 '■ 

1*4 

2*9 

2% 

31 39 JO 

—236% 

6*0 


2427*0 

—1*7% 

Lombard 

6*0 


Call money 

495 

*95 

19897*8 

—051% 

3-month Interbank 
amain 

5.10 

500 

2185.15 

-XW% 

Bank base rota 

5% 

5% 

Carr money 

$«. 

5*0 

10145*0 

— 1J4% 

3-marrtti Interbank 

5h 

5n 

am sw>l 16 

Sept9 

are* 

636*0 

—003% 

London pm fix* agu e 

39075 

—0.19% 


Education 


Directo 


Every Tuesday 
Contact 
Fred Ronan 

Tel.: (33 1 ) 46 37 93 91 
Fax: (33 1)46 37 93 70 
or your nearest IHT office or 
representative 


Turnover 

Operating costs 


Operating profit 

Share of profits of associates 


Exceptional item 


Profit before interest and taxation 
Net Interest expense 


Profit before taxation 
Taxation 


Profit after taxation 
Minority Interests 


Profit after taxation and 
minority interests 
Preference dividends 


Profit attributable to ordinary 
Shareholders 
Ordinary dividends 


Retained profit for the period 


Earnings per ordinary share 
Dividends per ordinary share 


2 , 637.4 

( 2 , 573 . 6 ) 


63.8 

44.0 


2 , 383.7 

( 2 , 322 . 2 ) 


61.5 

40.4 


101.9 


Year ended 
31st December 
1993 
USSm 


4 , 979.6 

( 4 , 807 . 3 ) 


172.3 

98.5 


270.8 


Dairy Farm International Holdings Limited 

Incorporated in Bermuda with limited liability 


A member of the JertOne Metheeon Group 


The interim dividend of UScl.65 per ordinary share will be payable on 1st December 1994 to onfiraiy Shareholders on die register at die dose of 
business on 30th September 1994 and will be available In cash with a scrip alternative. The onfinary share registers wffl be closed from 3id to 7fli 
October 1994 Inclusive. The ordinary dividend, declared In United States Dollars, wffl also be available in Austiafian DoBars, Hong Kong Dollars and 
Sterling calculated by reference to rates prevailing ten business days prior to (tie payment dale. Orcfinary Shareholders on the International branch 
register wffl receive United States Do Bars whBe ordinary Shareholders on die Hong Kong branch register wM receive Hong Kong Dotare, unless they 
elect lor one of the alternative currencies by notifying the Company's registrars or transfer agents by 4.00 pjn. (local time) on 4th November 1994. 
Ordinary Shareholders whose ordinary shares are held through the Central Depository System In Singapore fCDP') m receive Hong Kong Dollars 
unless they elect through CDP to receive United States Dollars. ... - 



British Airways 


The world’s favourite airline a 










































Page 10 


mutual funds 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 1994 


I OrpNnme WUylGrpNsme WWy | Grp Name WUy [Grp Nairn wviy Grp Name wldy 'Ctp. Np ww WMy -Pro Name wuy 
| Fd Nortvj Lotf a*iw FdNome Last Oioe Fd Nome Last Chat I Fd Nome Last One F<l Name Last Owe RJ Name Last Ohu Fa Naim La* Ch*e 


WWy • Cm Name 





Naim Last On 


Case of trading Friday, Sept 16. 


GfraName WWy I Grp Nome witty 

Fd Nam Last age Fd Name Last Cbge 


SCTxFt 9.78 -27 

TNTxFt 9.B2 —.OS 


WWy I Grp Name 


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9.99 —02 


TNTxFt 9.B3 —.OS 
TXTxFt 1020 —.08 

® Rtnt III —.11 
TxFt 9.96 —.05 
WVTXF t 9.1 B —04 


Guant&a 1X06 *.04 LTGavt 9.45 _ VATxFt 9.96 — 05 

Grp Nome Wktv I Gra Name VUMU STRxInc 5jiS *J1 Mgnilrtc 9.99—02 WVTflF I 958 — 26 

criiuJ.™. . .5E* l* , 5L l S*™ . W’°V sovtuni 1053 —03 Dean Witter Eaton VTrafiHooafc 

^ Name Last awe Fd Name Unt aw aSmarad Fva&y AmVoft 5172 -ts Oiinop ixm +25 

Am«rEqn96? +.10 cufTxFrt 125? — 05 EvStK 1237 +.10 


AAL Mutual: 

Bwwp 95? —03 

CpGrp 1470 +.12 

saat’WTji 

BaiSlBn 1484 -.fli 
CaPGm 325B *.15 
GffWMn 1478 —.03 

Cavtncn 3471 -.12 
HQBdn 15.10 -27 
17.07 —.06 

AST Funds 
Emervp 1360 -53 
FLyj. 1025—05 
FLTT 104 —OS 
CwthinwciLOi -.12 
.Ufillncp 1475 —SO 


nst-u^ 

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GvScAp 963 -22, 

GvScB D 9.B4 — JT2 

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^gfn nD m-'i 

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Jmdyffln 1755 + 54 


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GvTTBp 122 —.03 Brfnnn Funds 


inB74 *4? I G a jOirpt J272 +.U 

Owlttrt 3X72 +53 

Kvint 945 . 

Euro! 1109 -29 
GU t 173 —.01 
GJbDivI 1166-23 
Gtobunit I0J9 — m 


EVS1K 1237 +.10 
Growths wn *xia 
incBos p 7.95 —ill 
Indio p 1U7 -.05 
MunBd 9.43 —m 


MedDetr 2353 *.4S d 

Mummed mso +.19 g# 

NotGosr 9.49 +28 Sc 

PaDerr 2144 + J7 Gr 

PrecMetrl?56 — 14 hi 

Reenter 19 5? + 4M HI, 

Retail r 25.90 r JB 1 Irx 
Soflwrr 2145*1.15 IN 

Tecnr 4X78+152 in« 

Telecom r 38.45 + .41 ln< 

Travsr 21.99 + 21 N> 

UHKSrr 3448— 26 Ini 


GfcHflhp 

GtUtllc 


57 Growth p 1171 -JJ4 
'■I* HYTFp 1071 —04 
JM HIMuBdpl072 —05 
JB i inqoSerc 2Ji 
.151 INTFp 1159— 4K 


1161 +.18 Bondn 9.92 -in j Intt§qms IV? -M MMtasn* Grra AgjRtiAp 9S7 —M 

12.13—04 GavtedR 9J7 _[ imilairsrtflAi —.06 aogvap ?.d7 —sn 1 AaRtTAn9J7 — 03 

16JB cnmhn 10.10 *J>5 UBdlrat 9J7 -Jl AmjyFdpllffi -.Tj. BdfNt 10J7 TjS 

" -- - TTAn 10J1 -JIB 


-JJ4 1 IncGrn 10J1 -.05 j UMgtinsTn.974 - CAMai o JJBB, -J2 
—04 1 incoEa 12.10 +JJ1 MedTEtft5t957 —SB Canada 10A2 -.19 


rT 16.10 *.14 1 
PA 13J1 *J1 , 


HamstdBd n 552 -ill 


MiMuins 9M —01 
ValEaln 1044 -.01 
vcdEaiwtaA9 -iti 


Fufiru: 0 9.34 —02 

Global 1WJ -J»l : 
LtdJVUlD lloo 
NYMunp 9.47 — i» 


3TAn 1149 +.1 
Srinp UA3 +.1 


nca 1473 +.1E 
14J4 —07 
9J8 — JX5 

Fdfi 

APresrtlDild —ill 


Irp 1143 +.15 Balance 11.95 . 

9JI5 —iU ! CATF 10A9 —Ja 


Tecnr 40JB*1J2 nstAjS 9 J2 — ill HamstdVl 1125 -.06 Kewmne _ NYMunp 9.47 —.01 

Telecom r3845 +41 njTFp H47 — ^5 HoracMnn 21JJ3 -j}7 CusBlf 1447 —.02 NOtMup 9J4 — 413 

Travsr 21.99 tin NYiramrriBS —B, Hud«aKS»r3J1 -il Cus83r HU — J33 NAmerp AM -412 

UHlGrr 3A48 —04 ntlEgp UOO *.02 HmSSlwJijO — 07 CuSB^t tj» . fttockenue Iww 

IdeAtv Spatan: KYlFp iffS -419 Hemrt H49 -14 ' CusKlt 944 _ QwaAt 10J3 — .10 

AarMun n 94S —05 ATFjp 10.9B -.04 KSd 8JS CusK2l 6.41 -57 0*toB 1033 —10 


Ip 7.90 *417 CAMYfn 9.97 —35 MDTFP 


IU-9B —.04 : HVDSD 

KSw 


radGut. 1047 —JO CTHYnr 1044—417 MassTFpllJl — J5 KfSg. .VS . m 
Trodlnvp 6.93 _ CAintim n 940 —03 A«cnTFpl145 — 32 KfiS- |4JW ** 
TrodToflpx745— .13 “ “ 


gvtibp aa— jBS 

GvTICO 6J2 — 4X3 SrlnsnGI MOJO — 411 
Grlncpx 12J4 +4>5 BnraGIBfMS *JO 
Grlncw 1188 +4)8 „NUSEqiY j.94 *JH 
HarbApx 14.04— V.JB Bracen 9159 +.12 


Grlncpx 1244 +415 
Grlncpx 12J38 +JJS 


FedSect 8J7 — 04 EcSpEqn 13J2 *23 
HittlSCt 10.43 +.14 EcflpBrS 1874 +.11 
Hilnooo 9J5 +4)1 Emerald Funds 
HIYId 4J4 _ Balhnstn 9.99 +JD 


HarbB px 144)1 —418 

Bs»rw 


SStgS£ ,a ' 3 — 

Baton rw 11.97— 4)9 
Fun «JB — JM 

AliiS n F U ^d E ,a07 “ ^, 

AvSGvp 7Jo —01 


WYlflBP 4.13 - 

MiAAa 9J0 —04 
MunBB p 9.90 -4)4 
PoeeAp llJS +.11 


n 10.17 —in 
ip BJ3 +40 


III =j§ 


Bo MAS +.10 
SAP 9.41 +J2 


Gfldlnvnpl7A5— .14 AftUFLt 10.18 —04 Srr<apl n 10.12 +.18 
GOvtSecnpMAi— 04 MUNJt 10.1)5 — W USGavA 9.TO —M 
Mulncp 1843 — M MuOHP 10415—415 USGovI n 9.92 — 4M 


CAWtrmn 9 AO —413 
FL Mum 10J8 —08 
GNMAn 9 JO —.02 
Govlnn 9J3 — 4M 
Hiohlnm UJI -M 
InlMun 9X2 — 4)4 
OivGrBdn 9^5 —03 
LtdGv 9J4 —01 
LTGnx TOJJ0 —14 
MDMum 9A8 —OS 
Munlnr ?J0 —.08 


MNins 11JB —4)5 
MOTFP 11J1 -JB 
NJTF 11.17—4)7 
NYlnsp 10A2-4W 
NY Tex p 11J5 —04 
NCTFp 11 J9 —415 

OhtolTFpltJd -3S 

ORTF p 114)9 — 4J4 
Pncfiwtti 1471 —.18 
PATFp 10J9 — M 
PremRtp 4J9 -4H 

PRTFp 1 122-35 


NJffr 1084 —.06 
NYHYmlOjT —.10 


Aorsvp 27 J3 
BalApx 15J1 
BalBtx 1SJ2 
Chart px 9471 
Const! P 17.9ft 
GaScp 9JS 
GrthBt I0J5 
Grthn 114Q 


RnEstHp 9 A0 *4)2 

RoESCO 9AI +4)2 
TEKYAplQJB —4)3 
TEHTTS a 10-77 — 4M 




tVUllTPAt 10.13 
NYTxFt 1127 


1724 —14 
17A4 +21 


NYlntern 

PAHYm 

Shtlncn 


9A0— 4)5 
10.18 —M 
925 


_• CusKJ I 

I; cussit 
.ml cusS3i 
I Cus54t 
.ns irmt 
. ni I KPMt 


4A9 

9A4 

6.4) -27 
2 299 -.10 
924 -JB 
7.77 -25 
7 A3 —4)1 
25A4 -20 


IA1 Funds CuS5+t /.// 

Solan pn 10.19 +25 JiS/,, ' 

Bond an SJA +21 KP“£. MA4 - 

EmfGrpnl4A7 -A0 Txgr t 1024 - 
aMwi 920 -21 ^T ?vF r > 

Grincp iiAO - n3 Keystone Amer As 
lrr?dn I3J0 —.18 i 
IrWBd 9,04-4)1. CARF *21 — 22 : 
Midcupn 14J1 -,1A I FtxA 10.12 ~X7 
RestonnpJOJO -.15 FOAA 1054 -JM 
Resrvpn 9.9A -21 '2-S I 

Value n 1127 * 09 1 GvSA 922 — 22, 
"■* ' HrE&A JIAO -.90; 

HrtGrA 2124 -28 


1023 -.10 1 
1023 —10 
17.92 +39 
15AA -.08 . 
9.81 +.04 
29.B1 -25 
2921 -25, 


Kin Sii=S 8B 

spa* 

1133 =S ■” 

gftidTA 1023 +27 
FMnTM 10JH —03 


„ . JntM 104)5 —Q3 

GAITAn 1028 —US 

GvtTAn 9J7 —sn 
GvtINt 9.47—23 
mMuTAn 934 —03 
IntEamr 1230 —.03 
imeiTAn1174 —23 


TxETrt 1024 — 4)6 Mainstay Funds 
TaxFrl 728 -24 CaApr 20.14 +.40 


1032 +23 
1645 — Of 
1424 +.10 


UUrn-4 '’WTTwz -it 


Convt 12.91 -.04 I M 

CreBdt 7J4 +4)2 1 M 

Eqldx 1426 - 2? 1 M 

Globlt 11.41 -23 ! M 
Govt 7 7.95 —ill I M 

HfRsGold tl 029 —21 SB 
TxFBt 9.40 — 25 1 St 

TotRIt 1520 -.17. SII 


MDtTA 10A4— 03 




MuriJAp 1021 -.05 
SKjVIAd 44» —21 


1Ap 400 —21 
1CI 420 —01 
TAP 420 -21 


: Burnham p 3024 .JJ2 

tSSfiltvn 3327 +.04 


HYldAp 928 
HYWBt 9.27— 21 


Inca P 7A2 
InflEp 13A7 +J» 

UmM p 9.93 
MuBp 8JM -J?J 
Summit 9 80 +.14 
TpCTo 1143-4)2 

TF Int I0J9 — .02 

Util a 15.15— 4)4 

Ut'IB 1 12.15 —.03 


TEHIY8 PI077 -4M OSMFwds; 

TaxExIA piToO— 35 AnwrTF 9.18 — 24 
TxEIBp 114)0 —4)4 Cert>evn2SJg — IS 
TXMSAp 9J72 —35 Fxdlncn 102? —05 
UlilAp 8J4-2A MUtln 27.17 +22 
UtilBp 8.33 — 4M ReaPvn 9.87—01 
mcnan Foods CalmosD 13.04 +4)7 
AmBalp 1225 . C&OAnoGr U23 —4)1 
Amen p l S Q - OB CA TTtn 1Q.1D — 413 

§«p P ?i1S-« C ffl T 7f?5-26 
8Sgffig|g 

CopWGr 1849—40 _SAPMW 12.17 +.12 


15JI —.04 TxEIBp 114)0—4)4 
1532 —01 TXMSAp 9J2 —35 
921 —.04 ' UlilAp 824—24 
’2-S --ai.WIgP AM -414 
925 — .02 ■ Amnricm Fuads 
I0J5 -.19 AmBalp 1225 
1123 +.19 Amen p l£S +.08 

?^_2t 

7.42 _ CapinBIP 3223 —«5 

13A7 +JH CaoWIdP 1527 +4)2 
9.93 _ CopWGr 18.49 —4)3 


I®, M-™- E SSSS?^r+j2 »D«?i5=Si 

PrcMf 1U9— 10 GvSecp ia92 -22 RduCaon 19A4 +.17 uSGavp &Si —M2 

Premier p 821 —01 fiwffinp 8J7 +29 StW^UtreM UWJjrtP All —10 

SelMup 1123 —10 Gflncp 1A19 +.13 Eure& 3(24 +JJ7 VATFp 1123 — 04 

ManamdtlOAS +21 HYBdp 1121—01 PacBsn 4021 —IS FtankCn Mad Trs 

F ew 924 —21 ' ’ ~ . -- 

USp 92A +21 


Gwthnp 8A7 +29 
Grlncp 18.19 +.13 
HYBdp 1121 —21 
IrntGfP 1728—10 
5mCO SS +24 


TAGOVP 9.95—24 

TS&VWS-je 

USGavp 6J2 —02 


IGtobAp 16,19 -24 
JGlabCP 14471 —06.1 Ome« 
2GrowApl7J4 +.15' 
2GTOWCP 17.14 -.14 1 SKA 
TTaxEx 11.12—4)6! I* FA 


T427-.lt; 5TlnTAn 922—01 


824 —01 Manaeen Funds ! STMuTAnp9.Bj— 01 


15.93 -21 
1028 -4)5 
xjn 
9-4$ —.04 


COPAsne 25.14 —25 j 

SaEane 38.99 -21 1 


9.62 —21 
923 —01 


I1J0 +.11 
10.12 —4)2 , 


Eupocd 2227 —4)4 Calvert Group: 

FrsrTVB 1EL51 +.11 GtobEa 1820 —29 


VatuBI 22.13 -23 


. Wfiimo 17J3 -J26 
AMF Funds 
- AdiMla 922 —21 
• IntMIe n 9 .40 —.01 
. InltUan JOJiO —21 
Mlasecn 1028 +2? 
'ARK Funds 

CaoGrn 1027 +27 
Grlncon 10 JT +24 
income 926 —21 


Fdinvn 1821 +.11 
Gown 1321—25 

GmrtttFd P 27.48 -J8 

HlTrrtP 1423 +21 
incoFOP 13.70 —01 
IntBdP T3J4— 04 
InvCoAp IB. 98 +24 
LtdTEBd 1420 —4)2 
NwEcon pi 5.1 B +.04 
NewPerp 15J2 —22 
SmCnWp3325 -JO 
TaxEXDtpllJl —4)4 
TxExCA DI5J1 —M 
TxExMOBlATB— .05 
TxExVA plSJft — 4)5 
WshMut PXI722 
AmGwlh 924 -4)2 


13.06 +27 TaxEx 1127 —25 
U23 -21 USGVtt 824 —24 
10.10 —4X3 Uliln 1223—24 
Hut: ValAdt 2025 +J0 

11J5 —26 WWInc 822 -21 
1021 —.04 WlaWdl 19J4 +21 
11J9 -27 TC BcS P 9J9 +23 
1117 +.12 TCCort 1233 +.11 
up: TCbKp 1025 +.03 

1820—4)9 TC Lot I 14.20 +.14 
1525 —26 TCNorfp 9.D2 +21 
10.13 —01 TC3CPI 927 +J1 


TEIncp 1125 —07 FWHorGvt 10J5 — 04 
1 Everareea Funds FtnHarMu r 10.28 —28 
Evramn 14.97 +21 First AmerFttiA: 




TtncPlAo 9 JB —.07 1 ™R|IA llfi -21 
Idex3 1477 +.15 1 WrtOBA 8J7 +21 
IFtoelnAR 8. 87 —26 K^ntnneAmwa: 


IncEa ne Z72S— 1.12 ; SOTAn 10.17 -25 
ShorvGv n 1726 — 4)9 I StFTAn 921 —4X3 


Kaystone AmerBs 1 GlbOcptn30J4 
CP12BT 9.43—01 Bonan 19.95—03 


IrttWUg n ISJ7 — 4J7 I TXlTAn 921—22 
SI Bond 17.14— .05, Valuetn t 1322 +25 


‘- 08 

f niiiKHn 1 anpc 1 


Found n 1226 —21 
GloRen 1X17—09 


Gntfncn 16J3 +28 
LtOAAktn 2125 +.17 


AstAUp 1(151 *23 
Baton p 1071 +22 
Eauttyp 1721 +J3 


GermGvt ili.99 -.05 


—23 DElp 7.79 *21 
+ 23 DbCOvp 11.19 -.19 


453 +.03 

A 84 —22 

5.12—03 
7.79 - 21 


value! A P 1X45 +24 

— , VaiueTA 1324 +.0* 

FttBt 1027— 27 imtEanx 3820 — 11 VAI TA n 10J7 — 23 

FOABl 10-43 +23 Mariner Funds VAllAp 1037—4)3 

GJOpB! 1925+21 Fxdlnc 921 -.03 1 NattorwxJ* F& 

GvSB I 921 —03 ; NY TF 1025 —28 , NTBOnd 8.63 —4)5 


MunCAn 1104 — M 
MunlFn 10.16— 3a 


GtobEa 1820 —29 
men 1525 — JM 
MBCAJ 10-13 —01 
Munlnt 1024 —21 
Social P 29.19 + 23 
Socfld 1524 —05 
SocEq 20.99 *21 


1024 —21 M Grp Iratfc 

29.19 + 23 Decl I 1< 


SocSd 1524 —05 

Sod=q 20.99 +21 

StrGwtti 14J1 
TxFLMn 1027 
TxFrUdClOAS +21 


025 +.03 MuniNatn 925 —472 
4J0 +.14 Rettmn 1MI +27 
922 + 21 TotRln 18*45 +4M 
927 + J1 ExoelMIdas 3.B9 —22 
Excsblor Instb 

1428 +.04 BalOKed 7J5— JS 
18J8 +21 EnGrawth 7 SB +4)5 
2522 +37 _EO index 734 +.05 


Ealdxp 10J4 +417 Fremont Funds 
Fxdlnc p 10 l 44 — .03 Bondn 925 —JM 

IntGvBdp 923 — 21 Global n 1331 —02 

Inline p 9.42 —22 Growth n 11 J6 +4)9 

IntTxp 1034 — 24 inHGrn 9J1 — 22 

Inti p 10.40 +22 CA Int 10+A0 — 03 

Udine 928 +21 FundTrust: 

Miosecp 9J7 — 23 Apaiespf 15.91 +411 

Rea&p 1176 +.11 GwihDt 1434 -22 


HllPCOirpM.47 +4X3 EqyltPl p 1120 -29 
remont Funds iyfrtnp 4.oi . 

Bond n » AS — JM FW'ncp 424 —.01 


TxFLnp 7A19 —02 ... 

TxFVT 1522 —21 Vaiuep 2024 +.12 Growth t 1X41 

LTSGov 13581—04 Defccpp 2528 +37 HiGtSdl 927 

Ombrutoe Fds DeUnp 1627 +4)6 HTYBdl 924 

CapGrA 1525 +4)5 DecTR p 1119 +37 Mated I 11 J? 

GvfnA 1228 —04 Dekiwp 1BJ5 +21 FFB Lexicon: 
GwIhA 14.96 +.16 mttEqp 1220 —4)5 Cap Add 1134 

IncGrAx 1527 +21 DetchAp 637 -4D Fxdln 9ja 

MuincA 1432 —24 USGavtP 724 + IrrtGv 9 29 


TsvRil 931 
MmnreDrnn 
Trend p llE +.10 


432 —412 ExlnvHiP 7X5 —4)1 
931 _ FAMVafn 20.92 +.11 


P 16.96 +4)7 Groin of 1233 +4M 

Fvct AmarFiUC tncopf 9.74 —01 

AstAHn 1051 +23 MsdTRpfll39 -21 
BctoncenlOJl +22 Fandamemal Fwids 
Eqldx n 10.93 +27 CAMun np 721 —28 
FxdWcn ItLJJ —23 NYMunrpl OO —21 
IntGvBdn 923 _ US Gov n 1.40 —22 

Inline n 922 — 4)2 Funds IV: 

InJTxFrn 1034 —4)3 &jS»ASnl04)5 +24 
Infllratn 1040 +jn lesinSn 9.94—21 
Udlncn 928 +21 SkAuSn 1023 +22 
MteSecn 9J7 —m GAMFunds 
RegEqin 12J6 +.T2 Global 13733+1.03 
SPOCEqn 1732 +J4 Inti 19534 +4)2 


' ASM Fd n 10.10 -.14 AHeritan 1.10 +.01 
AVESTA: Amer Nall Funds 


AVESTA: Amrr NsM Funds 

Balanced 1739 -.09 Growth 4A0 +24 

EqGro 1X95 +.17 Income 2120—23 

Eqlncnm 1B35 +.11 TriBex 15.6? +4M 

Income 15.3J—02 APIGrpnf 1X94 +.06 

Accessor Funds Am Perform: 

inrFxlnn 1134 -4)3 Bond 932 —03 


USGov 1190 —24 
Cambridge Fds 
CapGrA 1525 +4)5 


FAMVain 2X92 +.11 
FBL5erfes 
BlChlpt 1931 +.19 
Growth I 1X41 +.12 
HiGrBdl 927 —07 
HTYBdt 924 —02 
Maned I 1179 +29 


GwIhA 1A94 +.16 inttEqp 1220 — 4)5 Cep Add 1134 +.13 

IncGrAx 1527 +21 DefchAp 632 -22 Fxdtn 924 —01 

MuincA 1432 —06 USGavt P 726 - IrrtGv 9.B5 —31 

CapGrBt 1497 +25 TreasAp 9J1 „ SefVatueplXiO +.10 

GtobB 1421 - TxUSAP 11.94 —25 SmCoGrnll.5» +JD8 

GvInBI 1189—4)6 TxlftsAP 10.92 —24 FFB Ea 1038 -29 
GwthBt 1420 +.15 TKlntAp 10J4 — 22 FFBNJ 1040 —26 
incGrBtx 1SA8 +4)2 TxPaAp 834 —04 FFTW Funds 


TreasA p 9J1 
TxUSAP 11.94 —25 


1331 —22 573 +412 

11 J6 +4» CtoGrp 7.12 _ 

9Ji —sn Grownup 1149 +.12 * 
10 A0 — 03 HiYdTE D 4M1 —22 
InsrTE P 533 —22 
15,91 +21 Inti p ia.79 —.0/ 
1144 -22 MfldRp 1229 +4)9 
1633 +4M Massp 571 —22 
974 —01 MichD 533 —22 
1139 -471 MNTEp 5113—02 


ImdBf BJS — 31 ! STFxInc 9.65 -21 

GmejtaB TI578 +31 : TREa 1277 
PTxrat 1021 —.06 Mork Twain Fds 
StcBt 733 + 22 EauilYX 104)7 +25 

TxFBt 9M — JM Fxdlncm 937 — 03 


TotRetB 1233 Muni 9.93—4)2 

leystone Ainer C iMamrwatchFds 
WOoCt Ifcfl -31| Eouitv 1BJ29 +4)2 


Munp 1270 —.02 
NYTEP 5.10 —SR | 


NewOp 1438 +.11 JJWRejC 1Z 

SSL, 


KIARF 932 —02 Ftaxlncm 9.73 

FixCt 104» — 24 rrrtFxln 9.44 

FOACt 10A9 +4S| VAMuBd 9.70—21 

GvSCl 02 —.03 Marquis Funds 
ImdCt SL76 —01 1 GvtSecA 9.47 —01 

PTxFCt 1023 —26 GminA 978 

StcCi 737 + 22 ValEaAa 9.91 *21 

TxFCi 9A4 —05 Marshall Funds 


NatnFa 1448 +26 
NJGvvrti 11 JB +27 
TxFret 9J4 —28 
USGvtnr 937 —25 
mbenerBanc 
AMT Bal nl42S +4)7 

iw^Tml^B +^ 
Guardnn 1934 +4)5 
LrdMaln 9.93 — ai 
Marmot n 11.13 +4)7 
MUST 1047 — 51 
NYCDCnlOJ? +26 
Pamirs n 2126 +35 
SeGeicin 2422 +20 


I Balii ‘974 +414 i'NwKSh? n 29.93 +2S 

Eqlnc 9.B3 — Ol iNewCnttp 1Z40 ~ 

Gvtincn 9.15 — JO ! New Enaand Fds 
1 WBd n 930 — ai I AdlUSAp 731 * 

• InJTxF 931 —04 BOKPIAP 1X10 

! MidCapn 9J2 +.14 BdlncA 11.17 — 

I ST Inc n 9.70 _ CA TF A p 734 - 

I Stodvn 1026 +4)6 CapGrA p 1/23 ■ 

ValEan 10.94 +26 GtofaGAplt.15 - 


stock n 16.96 +28 Pacta 19531-231, 
Flrtt Amer Mutt A: GEEHunS&S: 


incGrBtx 1548 +22 I 


DivrGrp 925 + 
Eqlneop 9.97 + 


AccAAortg Mao — 01 

ShrtmFx 1137 
, Acomln 1648 —.14 
AemFd 1343 


MuIncBt 1653 —.06 Dot-Pootod Trust. 
apMkldxn!130 +27 DefEa 1322 


AemFd 1343 _ AmUtIFd n 1931 —05 

AdsnCop 2032 +.12 AmwyMut 734 +27 
AdvCBnfp 1078 +.06 AnatvtShTGv9Jl — 21 
- AdvCRetp 938 — 22 Anotvhcn 1230 +.06, 
, Advest Advaih AnchCop 2036 +.11 

lAnthmGrnplDJM +25 


Tl 75 +.08 CapAMcldxn11J30 +27 
10.15—02 Cappielto RuDimore: 
1030 —03 EmSCrn 11.13 +J29 


Gnvrh izn +.13 DbnenstonnlFdE 
CaopHHUtl 330 —26 I Inttvdn 1046 — 4M 


FTW Funds Manglnc p 937 +4H. 

US Short 9.92 - First Amor Mutt C 

WW Fxdln 942 +21 DivrGwth n927 + 25 
WW ShTm 9J2 — J)1 Eqtylnco n 9.97 +JQ 
MB Funds LtdTerm n 9.97 


Proeresp 726 +28 
Setocrp 871 — 4M 
Stock p 1926 —21 
sir ABB t 1441 +25 
sir Eat 932 

Strlnct 5J1 — JD 
SrST I .98 
»Mrt5t 575 — 4U 
TE BrtdP 379 —22 
Utnincp 633 


ARM GvA 1121 
ARMInstAlljr— 21 ' 
ARAlUnstB 11.97 —01 
AstAKBx 1333 + 26 | 
EmAAktA 1245 +.06 I 
EmMktS 1239 + 26 | 
GtbFaBn 1678 + 28 


Govlna &91 —01 

Gwthnpel427 +31 . , , _ ... 

HYBdpe 835 —04 AZ TF 10.13—4)6 NZkmO 1030—17 

. Inca no 12.35 +40 COTF 1029 —.05 NJaaon 729 —11 

MuBONai 9.19 —.07 HI TF 11.07 —24 CnrdmaLFajn.lv: 

Sodnp 2022 +30 KY TF 1835 —.05 AmGtfl 1020 +.10 

Slrallne 1224 + 31 NronsITF 941 —26 Balanced 9.98 +22 

, Aetna Advisap ORTF 10JJ —25 Fund 1Z95 — 4)3 

Aetna t 1033 + 23 TxFUT 930 —4)7 GavtObliO 820 — .02 

Boner 938 — 22 Aquinos Fund: Cornea 1X14—.0S 

GrincDm M125 +4M BOatcen 975 +4M CdmeflOHTE943— 03 
■ ItntGrt 114ft —.09 Eatncn 9.93 +jn Canlum Funds 
TaxFree 9J3 —4)5 Fxlncn 944 —31 EaGrwCn 9.97 +.15 
AMna seteefc Arch Funds FedStoC n 9.«2 — 21 

Aetna n 1035 +4)3 Bal 9.96 *4)2 NCTFfl 927 —23 

AsianGrn 9.63 +4)9 EmGrth 1238 +24 CenlumGp 9.12 +24 

Bondn 938 —.02 GovCorp 9.7B — JO CntryShr n 2142 +.13 

Govt 9S3 —SO Grolnc 13JT +24 ChCaoBC 1110 

GraWlh 1 1 JM -.15 MoTF 1026—37 ChesGTOi 1429 *39 

Grwinco 1127 -.06 USGav 1070 —23 CHestnt 15033 +1.74 

InttGrn 1149 — 29 AtMAppp 2227 —.04 ChtcAADw iikI732 +234 
SmCOGr 1022 +J5 ArlelGroP 2820 — 25 CbubbGrtn 1623 +.11 


CUpsttme Group: 
Fund SW 1545 


Aqutta Funds 
AZ TF 10.1 


Fund SW 1545 + 4)8 
Grwth 13J4 +.13 
Gvtlnc 425 + 21 
MedRs 1832 + 28 
NZkma 1030 —.17 


13J2 +26 WW Fxdln 942 +31 
974 +23 WW ShTm 9J2 —21 
1X05—27 PMB Funds 
JFds DivECp 1174 +4B 

1046 — 4M Dlvll 1174 +H 
14.13 +.10 brtGCp 927—02 
874 +.10 IntGl 927 —02 


975 -JK Drvwsfd n 1472 +21 TEBndP 379 —02 11.96 —02 

9.97 +23 Gtobdi n 17J4 +26 UJ”ncP 6J3 _ gbFttA 1« — ra 

927 + 22 Income n 1050 —23 » Fw*g G«wt 1371 —23. 

lUtlC S&S Lr» n 1022 — .03 fJupiPn 10.13 — ^2 MgA 11 M -24 . 

9.27 +25 SS5 PM n 3732 +.17 NaAm p 9J1 +24 MPS tx 2X87 — 03 

9.97 +40 TaxEx 1176 —06 Trjtp 9J9 — .02 MuraBdA 1023 —06 I 

9.97 - Trusts n 34J2 +4)9 rWOneGT 9 .66 —04 SmCapA H74 -J9 

19.56+21 GB Funds WewnSence ttoee _ .. 


GibEoCn 1727 - .08 I Mothers n 1445 +31 
GDEqA 16.96 +28 .Maxes Funds I 

GBjFxB 11.96 — sn I Equity pnfi428 +4M I 
GbFxA 1156 —031 Income f 1071 — JM 
GvtAt 1371 —23 Laurent oitO. 15 +471 
intFtA 11.50 — 4K . Medalist Funds 
KPEtx 2327—03 1 MDMul tn!0J6 — 4M 


Mnaalna>n9JA +21 GB Funds — . — — — — _ + 

FstBasiG 9.12—21 RxIncCnllJl —04 gpoorlR It 2? +24 gtTmBdnlJW- 

"stEaarnr 1529 +26 GlobalC 1975 +27 snlgytp 931 -22 SjiTmGatfn2J» 

T & 1024 +23 incomeCnltJl— 03 TRBdo 926—24 . ■ 

rstFdTot 935 —.04 inttEcffln 558—25 , P 11 20 *sn L™±Tiart( Funds 
rnwMu 1036—05 strmt £29 + SO .tovRes h _ . 439 -4)1 

mt Imeshxs USEaDn 645 + 27 InjrSerOiitBd: 1J72 • 

BKKpp 1570 +28 GEUSE 643 +.08 CapGrfx 1X01 —01 Wte 9.13- 

Gtoblp 633 —ST US&A 641 +4)7 OyaBtk 14J7 +23 I InHEq 1236 ■ 

Govtp 1072 —03 GITUrvSfc . USGvt _ 942 —01 "P >055 - 

Grot nca 673 +32 EaSpcrt 2024 +.12 Inv^tor Furxfa: USGMnM 

High YOP 699 „ TpNOIn 92B — 06 Ec£rfliApUL31 +.10 

Income P 190—01 TXFrVAnlflL68 — 4)5 GWrtA A p 9.94 — SO £ap4D 2854 
InvGrdp 943 — 40 GTGiobat ^tGovAp 94M — $*0 12.18- 

USAnp 11 JM +4)7 Atnerp 19.91 +J4 PAMumAp».94— 03 Intp 1337 - 

AAATFp 1U8— 4M AmerS 1973 +J4 Imp** Jtodl P 1045- 

MlTFp 1123 —07 EmMkt 1695 +.17 Dynmp 1050 +.17 S^TD 1623 

NJTF a 1248 -28 EmMWB 1823 +.16 EfT+srth pnll54 +24 . - 

NYTxFr 014.13 — .M Europe P 1078 . gOTyn 1023 +.19 nn 

PATFp 1112 —23 EuroB 1069 _ Stvlntn 6» -.11 Batocfln 1029 ■ 

SpecBd 1121 —23 GvtncA 857 + 22 Europe n 1115 —4M Wmhtn 1079 - 

Sparp 1619 +J0 GvIncB 857 +22 FkiSvcn 15.94 +28 |8«Mn 10.36 

TaxExptp 929 -27 GrlncAp 622 -22 Goldn 526 -21 , Stock n 1852 ■ 

TotRel b 1121 _ GrtncB 672 —01 Growth nc* 523 ♦ 23 Larard Group; 

UtDlnCOP 501—40 HBCrB 1972 +.?4 HtfhScn 34.93 +27 Equrty 1426 

VATFp 134)2—4)7 HOncB 1276 +.13 HiYldnp 673 —21 W*Ed 1349- 

irstMut 698 + JO HOncA 1277 +.14 IminconpllAf +JB 5«SC }J76 - 


nr 1529 + 26 
1024 + 23 


Japan n 2721 —47 


10J7 —4)3 iFTHwMu 


UKn 2529 +.15 FPA Funds 
Contn 1601 —02 Ccplt 20J8 +21 

DEAR IE st 197 2 +22 Newlnc 10^ +21 

Rxdn 101.03 +26 Parmnt I4jg +.11 

GlBd 9693 —27 Peron 2Z17 —05 , 

Gtwtn 10693 —11 Fairmtn 2530 +32 
IntGv KM73 -JO FOsdanon 1621 +.14 , 
tnttHBM 1129—27 Federated Funds 
Leapt nt 1279 —22 ArmSS on 958 —01 
PadSm 1626 +.10 Arm In 958 -21 


First Imresins 
BlOipp 1570 +28 
Gtoblp 633 —ST 


1072 —03 Grrtnvsfc 


GtobalC 1975 +27 
IncomeCnltJl —03 
InKEcffln 558 —25 
StragC £29 +22 
USfcaDn 645 +27 ! 
GEUSE 643 + 28 1 
US &A 641 +27 


Govt 953 -23 
Growth 11.04 -.15 
Grwinco 11.07 -.06 


Pocftim 1626 +.10 
USLgVal 1036 — 0) 
USSmVd 1221 +.13 

IV— If— 

aSannxMAl —JO 
Income raio.90 —22 
Stock nx 56.10 +23 
Dom Social 1259 —03 
Dieman Funds 
Contm 1457 +4M 
HLRtn 1680 +.10 


Amt I n 958 — 4T1 
ExchFdn 7470 +53 
Hat IS n 1075—02 
FSTIIsn 669—21 
FGROn 2151 +.07 
FHYTn 669 +21 
FlTlSn 921 —24 


FfTSS D 921 —24 TaxExut p 959 —417 
FStatlSn 1D7B— 21 TotRdB 1121 


Growtnr 2034 *70 
IncGrr 1Z43 -.15 


Armsthen 9.15 +.12 
Alton laGrPlIJS +.10 


MidCpGr M2J2 +.34 
^^riCapJii|22J2 +48 


Aliancep 6.99 +25 
Brsanp 1147 +22 
BaianBI 1616 —21 
BondA p 1Z97 —4)2 
Cnstvlnv 1035 —21 
CpBdBn I2J6 -SXi 
CoBdCp 1256 —22 


Z43 +.15 Altos Fuads 
1232 +.24 CAInsA 954 —23 
(232 + 48 CgMuniA 1073 —03 
: GvtSecA 975 —03 

6.99 +25 GromcA 14T9 +.13 
147 +22 NoMuniA 1075 — .03 
4.16 —21 BB&T Finds: 

2.97 —sn BotTrn 927 


GrolncTnll53 +23 
intGovTn 9J9 —03 
NQnITB n 921 — 23 


Count p 1759 +.11 SIGovTn 935 — 21 
GTOGwie P 9.12 —02 BEA Funds 
GibSAp 1120 +25 EMkET 2571 +J6 
Govt An 7.73 —4)3 InttEa 2078 +23 
GovtBp 773 —03 ANirtBd 1455 —25 
GovtCp 7J2— 4M ShlDurCtt n694 
Grolncp 2J6 . ShtDurlnv n693 

GwthC 2147 +J2 StoFxln p 1S77 — J3 
GwthFp 2536 +J9 USCFxln 1441 —23 
GwthBt 21.46 +32 BFMShDun 9.71 — .02 


9.15 +.12 Chubb TR 1437 +.05 Dreyfus 
178 +.10 Cfipoorn 5073 —12 A Bondn 1159 —05 
Cofoaial Funds Aprecnp 1X34 +26, 

954 -22 CofTEA n.76 —05 AssefAinlZ97 +.«7 

073 —03 COtlTEA 7.18 —OS BotoCd 1X69 +.05 

975 —03 Fedsec 10.12 —03 BosidrnM4C!53 —22 
AT 9 +.13 FLTEA 7.13—4)8 CafTX n 1425 —417 
075 —.03 FundAx 612 —40 Coilran 1X03 —04 

: GtbEaA 1276 - CTIritn 1250—03 

927 _ GrwthA p mss +4S Dreyfus 1227 +ja 

153 +23 HiYldA 449 —21 EdEftid 1032 —.18 

9J9 — 23 InatmeA p 627 — .02 FLIntn 1X98 — 4M 

921 — 23 IntGrA 1045 —27 GNMAnplA15 —JO 

935 —21 MATxA 747 — 4)6 GnCA 1X97 —07 


Contm 1457 +4M FsrOhtSSplma —21 IffllUKOP £01—40 

HLRtn 1680 +.10 FSTn 2647 +.18 VATFp 1X02 —27 

SmCpVdtnlXO? +J3 FSTI SSp 669 —Si RrstMut 698 +J0 
treyfus _ GnmalSn 1039 — m First Omaha: 

A Bondn 1359 —05 GnmaSp 1039 — Equdyn 11.14 +.10 
Aprecnp i£34 +26 Ftotssp 10J5 —02 Fxdlncn 947 —22 

As9efA8n1X97 +4)7 Inflnclnst 9 J4 — 23 StFxlnn 932 

Balncd 1X69 +.05 IMTI5 1040 — JD FPDvAstP 1253 —02 

BasiclniM6C!53 — SSI MtoCop 11.12 +.11 FPMuBd P 1130 — 23 

carrxn 1635 -27 MedABrn*ai7 —04 First Pztorfly: 

CNimn 1X03 —04 ModGfnxl023 — .10 EquItvTr n!079 +4)3 
CTlirtn 1250—03 MudGro rrio JH —07 FxptncTr 932 — 24 

Dreyfus 1227 +JD MgSncnx 9.95 —415 LtdMGw 958 — 21 

EdEttKt 1082 —.18 MaxCap 12JB +28 HrstUmon: 

FLIntn 1198 —24 Minicap nil 27 +.14 BaTTnx 1177 —.11 

GNMA RP 141 5 -SO StirtTerm 10.14 — 21 BcHltnx 1178 -4)9 


MumBdA 1052 —26 I StOCklM 1119 +.10 Star A P 1X42 +.18 

SmfapA 1124 + 29 j StOCkTn 1119 +.10 TxExAp 7.18—24 

jewrtlrafc USGavTn 927 — .02 ValunAp 61S +53 

IntTmBdn 159 —.01 USGvtltn 927—22 BakmBt 1X05 +24 

ShTmGovn220 _ I VAMuTnlOJS — 22 CdDGrBt 14J3 +J2 

TaxExmptt99 — 21 VaMunlt 10J5 — 40 IntEaBt 1623 —11 

nndmartc Funds iMentGOi 1356 +20 StorBp 1141 +.19 

Baton n list) _ jMentStrn 1X39 +.13 | VoiueB 610 +4)3 

Eauityn 1472 +4)7 MeraerFdPtBJl -4)3 NewUSAo 11.95 +J1 
Mine 9.13 —03 1 Meridian n 2552 -J4 Nicholas Groap: 


AtSUS Ap 721 —S3! 
BatcmAp llio +4)4 
BdlncA 11.17 —01 
CATFAP7J4— 03 
COpGrA P 1423 +J2 
GtobGAplT.15 +22 
GrOnAp 1X92 +.06 
GVSCA p 1072 —23 
GwltlAp 1BS38 +23 
ffllncAp 9X9 —02 
httEoAp 1635 —10 
LtdTnri AM J6 -40 
MassTAplSTl —10 
Star A p 1X42 +.18 
TxExAp 7.18 —04 
ValueAp 615 +23 
BakmBt 124)5 +4)4 
CUDGrBt 1673 +J2 
IntEaBt 1623 —11 
StorBp 1141 +.19 
votoeB 610 +23 


In tlEg 1236 + JM i MerriB Lynch A: 
NYTF np 1055 —.08 : AmerlnAt 9.07 —02 


USAnp 1124 +27 
AAATFp 11J8 —26 
Ml TF p 1123—07 


NJTF p 1X48-28 
NYTkFr P1613 —28 
PATFp 1ZI2— 28 
SpecBd 11J1 —23 
5pSIfP 1619 +J0 


Emsmjpnli54 +24 


Energy n 1QJ2 ♦ .19 Ltnirel Trosfc_ __ 
Environ 658 +.111 Balncdn 102? +.M 


1118 —22 I 
1337 —sn 
1045 -2) 
1633 +.17 I 
1134 —251 


Europen 1X15 — JM i tolmlnn 1079 —23 ColTA 1856—23 InaSrA 1; 

FinSvcn 1694 +S3B SiPSOOn 10J6 +27 DevCoop 17.19 +21 lncGrB 1 

Goldn £26—21 stock n 1852 +.?4 , DrogAt 17.91 +4)9 WWGrS 1, 

Growth ns 553 +23 LraardGrow* I EuroA 1557—15 WWar 1 

HlthScn 3693 +27 Equity 1686 +23 FedSecA p 978 — 03 Nomura n 1 


ArfiRA p 9A8 —21 
AZMA 1073 —04 
BalA 1122 +4M 
BasVIA 2X38 +.10 
CA1MA 9J9 —24 
COIMtiA 71.15 — 24 
COPFdA 2778 +25 
Consult P 1320 —4)6 
CpHIA 739 
OnvGdA 1023 —04 
CPITA 1856 —23 
DevCoop 17.19 +21 
DragAt 17.91 +4)9 


Nicholn 5153 +.19 
Nchlln 2692 +.18 
MOilncn X37 
NchLiJn 1614 +4)5 
Mtrfcnfnj AfiPjCflQlC- 
BaIGthB 13^+77 
CoreGtoA13J9 +.09 


Pradentw 

ActBaln 


CoreGr7hB1119 +29 
CareGrtnst12J5 +29 


HlthCrp 1925 


1045 —4)7 GNMA np 1615 —JO 
737 —26 GnCA 7X97 —.07 


Ml TEA 675 —04 GMBdp 1478 —27 
MN TEA 694 — 04 [ GNYp 19J9 — 4» 


US Govt n 965 —26 
STMT SS Pi 0.1 4— 01 
_SBFAn 16J0 +24 
FfaMOY AdVtfOR 
EqPGR 29J2 +62 
EaPlncAxl662— 4)2 
GbIResc 1828 +.19 
GavInvA p 9.07 —03 
GtwOppp 2638 +.10 
HIMuA p 1154 —07 
H1YWA BP11J2 +22 
tn cGtp 1420 + 27 
LWTS1A 0927 — 25 
LtdTBRA 1035 -22 
LtdTEI 927 — 25 
OvseaP 1X99 —12 


NatResA 1119 —03 
NY TEA 621 —.06 


_ BJBGIAn 11.04 +26 
1178 +25 BJBtEqA D 1175 +21 
970 —03 BNY HamADK 
938 —28 Eqlnc 114)3+4)2 
9J8 —08 IntGovt 9X9 -23 
9 J8 —28 NY TE 9.90 —02 
78X2 —.02 Babsan Group: 

1673 —21 BondLn 150— 21 

iTn" y J 

933 —01 tntl 17.06—11 
932 —01 Shadow n HUM +25 
932 —21 TaxFrSn 1030 —.03 
7.97 > TaxFrL n 869 —05 

7.97 . UMB Bn 10.70 —22 


MrtgCa 631 —.03 
MtgTrAp 933 —.01 
MtflTBp 932 —.01 


OhTEA 722 — 25 
SmStkP 1639 +70 
StrtlncA 671 
TxExAp 1X93 —10 
TxInsAp 7.88—25 
USGrA 1X17 +28 
USGvA 637 —21 
Util A D 1169 —.12 


Grfncn 1674 +26 
GwmOpnlOAJ +4)5 


lnsMunnol7J3-.il 
Interm n 1168 —JO 


ilA d 1169—12 
Wl 778 —25 I 


il n=a 

1 tX 6 2—23 
[B 1X71 —21 


BctCtnx 1178 —29 
BaflSpx 1177—10 
FLMuniC 9X2 — JM 


InttD 11.11 — JM 

IntlB 1121 —26 
Japan p 1X73 —71 
JaponGrBlX63 — 71 
LatAmG 2687 +J4 
Lot AmGB 2672 +73 
PocHjP 1529 +JM 
PdCifB 1694 +4M 
StratAp 1697 +26 
StratB 1697 +26 
Telecom 1730 +j® 
TeleB 1767 + 28 
Wldwp 1772 +417 
WldwB 1756 + 27 


lndlnconpll39 +23 , ,,-r - n - -. 

IntGpvn 1X08 —22 SrnCaP 15J1 +.11 FdGrA 

InttGrn 17J4 —SS! SoEq 1651 +4N GIA1A 

Leisure n 2279 +J9 StrgYd 963 — 21 GIBdA 

SSron 1670 -28 LebenNY 760 —23 GICvA 
Sd^i®6l3 LeebPern 1650-21 GlHdA 

ShTrBdp 962 — 21 LMB Mmon: GIRsA 

TxFreenplSJS —.07 I AmerLdpl609 +22 | GlWSm 


1369— .14 1 FLMA 
11 J6— 10 i FdFTA 
15J1 +.11 FdGrA p 

1651 +4N G1A1A 

963 —21 GIBdA 

760 —413 GICvA 


FxbiBpx 972 —25 GabeC Funds 
FxlnTnx 9.72 —iff, ABC p 1B61 +4M 


HiGdTFBplBJ? — 29 Asset np 2180 +.18 
ffiGdTFCtl0.17 — 29 ConvScpnll35 +22 


ffiGdTFC 110.17 — 29 ! 
MnBdT nx 951 — JM 1 
NCMunCI 968 —4)5 
USGviB p 9X5 —.04 
USGvTCr 9J5— 4M 
UttUlvCht 4.14 — 04 


+.19 MnBdT nx 951 —05 
—03 NCMunCI 968 —4)5 
+ .10 USGviB p 9X5 —.04 
—27 USGvtCr 0J5 _.Q4 
+ .02 uttinvCht 4.14 — 04 
+ 27 VatueBP4l728— .17 
—25 ValueC tnx 1729 —15 
—22 VoiueT HX1727 —.19 

.a 


MtgTBD 932 —.01 Shadow n 1604 +2 
MtoTrCp 932 —21 TaxFrSn 1030 — .0 
MMSAa 7.97 > TaxFrLn 869 —0 

MMSBt 7.97 . UMB Bn 10.70—2 

MCAAo 9.77 —27 UMBHrtn 958 +2 
MuCABp 9.77 — 27 UMBStn 16J0 +2 
MUCACP 9.77 -27 UMB Ww nil J3 
MuFLCp 691 -28 Value n 2659 +.1 
ICATA 1X30—13 BoilardBiebU Kai son 


UMBHrtn 958 *. 
UMB St n 1620 +. 


UMB Sin 1620 
UMB Wwnl1J3 


StrtlncA 6/1 _ InterEq p t£35 — 24 GovInvA p 9.07 — 03 NCMunCI 96B —4)5 

TxExAp 1X93 —10 InvGNn 1464 —23 GrwOppp3A38 +.10 USGviB p 9X5 —.04 

TxIrtsAp 7.88 —05 MAIrrtn 1224 —.05 HI MuA p 1 154 — 07 USGvtCr 9X5 —U 

USGrA 1X17 +JB MA Tax nl 575 —4)5 HmflAonlI22 +.02 UlflllvChc 9.U _.04 

USGvA 637—21 MunBdn 1X19 — .06 tn cGtp 1680 +27 ValueBP4l728 — .17 

Uhl Ad T169 — .12 NJIntn 114)2 —24 LtdTSlA D94L7 — 25 ValueC tnxl729— 15 

CA TE Bt 696 -.05 MJ Mun n 1XB9 —25 LtdTBRA IMS -22 VotueT nx1727 —.19 

CTTEBt 7.18—25 Nwtdr 3430 +J5 LtdTEI 9.87 —.S3 Hag Investors 
FedScB 110.12 —03 NYlTynpllJB -23 QvseaP 1199—12 EmGttiD 1X49 +J2 
FLTxBt 7.13-28 NY Tax n 1682 -27 STRp 953 -21 Intlnp 9.91 

FundBtx B.I2 — 4B NYTEP 1754 —27 SlrutOpA P20.M + .13 IntTrp 1620 >26 

GfltEaB ixn —21 Peoplndt 16X5 +.11 FMeHy Iratflufc MMuniP 1613 — 22 

GwthBt 1199 +28 PeoMk)rnl7J5 +.17 EqPGI n 2955 +63 QualGrp 1X63 +26 

HYMuBt 9.71 —sn SMnGvn 1020 — 22 Ec#>llnx 1650 —25 TeHncShpl3J8 i .17 

HYSecBI 669 —.01 ST Inc DO 1121 —03 IShlGv 9J8 — 21 ToIRTsy p 9.29 —4)2 

Incomes 607 — .02 ShlnT p 1X93 —.02 U Bl n 10J6 —21 Value p 11 JO t 4)5 

IntGrB 1639 —417 ThdCntrn 739 +.10 FkWBy Invest: Flagship Group: 

MATxBt 767 -26 UST |rrt 1268 — 4M AorfFm 1IJ8 -4)7 AATEap 1646 -JM 

NatResBtlll5 — 24 USTLng 1X52 — 13 AAAam 1667 +.02 AATEC P 1065 — JM 

NYTxfl 621 -JO _U5TSh n 1690-23 AMgrGrn16D6 +25 AZTE A p 10J8 -JO 
OH TxBt 722 —25 OreytusComstocfc AMgrln n 10J2 — 21 CTTEAp 1023 —40 


PacHp 1529 +JM Tech n 24J5 +20 GblGovtpx9.90 — 21, GtUtA 1X58 — 415 

Pdrtfl 694 +24 TilRtn I860 +22 GvtlnaiV 927 —21 GrlRA 1688 + JB 

SfrtfAp 697 +26 USGovI np6Jl —24 Wild Px 1621 -27 HeafftlA 332 +21 

StrSS 1697 +26 UtOn 9JS +25 InvGrnp 956 —05 lnstlnp 938 — 21 

Telecom 730 +S ValEq 17.98 +29 MdTFp 1530-25 tntlEaAt 11.78—05 

TBtaE 1767 +S InvTrGvtBt B32 — J14 PATFp 15J1 -24 1 MIMuA 933 —p 

WdWD 7J2 IstolFdnp 1673 —24 Splnvno 21.73 -27 MNMuA 1617 -P 

Wktarf? 756 tp SBltaSS: TxFrimp 1428 —03 LalAmA 11850 +J4 

tobS^utids Bondn 923 —24 TotRel np 13J7 +21 MniraA 724 -4)3 

AKP 10.41 +26 DiversitonlOJW +22 , ValTrno 19.91 +22 MunUdA 9.85-21 

Amet np ?inn - IB ExnqMJcEfllii? +28 Lrfmwn Bntthers MubiTrA 932 —02 

CUnvScpnl135 +JH ^eqtvnl03? —4)9 gSISStin’Io — ^ 12-S —23 

Ealnco 1176 +4M ST Bond n 937 _ SelGrSlB 1 10 Jfl +.13 NJMA 1050 — .02 

GUntCPn 1032 Im Sm^nl0J3 +P , - 01 -fi 

G^np2XM I JO l?S^-.g7 QJjr. „ 1122 +.11 PtmxA Jig +.08 

SmCciPG 1766 + 16 ncome 9.61 —.02 GNMAn 7J6 — 31 SpVlA 1£93 *.10 

vSuefi 1X46 +J2 TaxEx 1613-01 CtoWM 1454-12 SODvA 1127 > .83 


ConvScpnll35 + JH 


Ealnc D 11.76 +JM 

GllntCPn 1032 + 26 i 


GllnlCPn 

GlConvn 


SpGrp 1623 +.171 CapFdA 27 JB +25 CoreGriraM175 +J» 

TfBdP 1134— 25| Consuttp I3JB —4)6 EmgGrA 1X48 +J3 

aurel Trash ' Cphia 739 . EmoGrB 1261 +J2 

Balncdn 104)9 -.05 OnvGdA 1023—04 EmsGrlnsllJe +J1 

totmlnn 10J9 -23 CPITA 1696—23 Ina&A 1189 +27 

S&PSOOn 10J6 +27 DevCaopl7.19 +21 lncGrB 1199 +27 

Stockn 1852 +.14 DragAt 17.91 +4)9 WWGrS 1557 +.07 

.azardGrouix „l EuroA 1557 —15 WWar 15.70 +27 

Equiry 1426 + 23 ; FedSecA p 928 —.03 Nomuran 1828 —12 

IntEg 1369—14 1 FLMA 936 —03 North Am Fuads 

mnsc 11J6— to; FdFTA 1437 *.13 AstAPCpniiJi +26 

SmCap 15-91 +.11 FdGrA p 9.99 +26 GiGra 14J2 -29 

SoEq 1451 +29 GUUA 1334 —04 GrwthCpnl5J9 +.1] 

StrgYd 963 -21 GIBdA 9.13—01 Gr [ncC pnl3.03 +.03 

ebenNY 760 —413 GICvA 1074 — SS6 USGvtAp 956 — 4M 

eebPern 1650—21 GlHdA 1353—05 NeinvGrn 2523 +24 
egg Mason: __ 1 GIRsA t 16J6 +21 NelnvTrn 1020 +27 

AmerLdpl609 +22 GtUSmA 1021 —21 Northern Funds: 

GbIGovfpxXVO —01 . GtUtA 1X58 —25 Fbdnn 937 —03 

Gvtlndnp 927 — 21 GrlRA 1688 + JB GrEqn 1053 + 27 

HIYId Px 1421 — 27 HeatthA 332 +21 ItKfiqn 1621—06 

tnvGrnp 956 — 05 lnstlnp 938 — 21 mtTaxExn9.96 — 02 

MdTFp 1530 — 23, IfTtlEaAt 11.78 —05 IntlFcJnn 921 +,?'5 

PATFp 1S71 — JMl MIMuA 933 —03 InIGrEqn 1070 —M 

Splnvno 21.73 —27 MNMuA 1617—22 UiOSelEa nll.10— 10 
TxFrlntP 1438 —23 LatAmA 1 1850 +J4 SetEqn 1033 +.02 

TotRel npl3J7 +21 MninsA 724 —4)3 SmCpGrnl614 +.11 

VaJTrnp 19.91 +22 MunUdA 925 —21 TxExotn 927 —23 

elKTOn Brothers; MubiTrA 922 -22 USGovtn 921 -22 

FIRtGvA 929 —4)2 MNattA 1023 —.04 Nonwesl Funds 
SdGrSlB 1 10 Jfl +.13 NJMA 1050 —02 AdjUST 957 — 21 

ShDurGvA 9.93 —21 NYMnA 10.96 —05 AdfovA 956 — JB 

exinattM Grp: ! PocA 2236 —.16 roTF A 956 —.03 

CnvSecn 14.14 +4U ; PAMA 1024 —23 GvttncTr 8J7 — 05 


GblGovt BX9.90 ^01 , 
Gvnna np 927 —01 
HIYId PX 1421 -27 
InvGrnp 956 — 05 
MdTFp 1530 —05, 


TotRel np I3J7 +21 I 
VaJTrnp 19.91 +22 I 


953 -21 
320.16 + .13 


HYMuBI 

HYSecBI 469 —01 
IncomeB 64)7 —.02 


MuFLCp 691 -28 Value n 2659 +.12 
ICATA _ 1X30 -.13 BaitardBiehU Kai ser. 


ICATA 1X30 -.13 

WW=3» 


MuOH C P 9.09 —27 
MuNJBp 9.14 —.07 
MuNJCp 9.14—27, 
MNYA 9.10 —09 
MuNYBp 9.10 -.09: 


BSSrWndto 8 


JWtd4YCP 9.10 —09 
MuPABp 9J3— .06 


O 9.74 — 

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Art Inc 9.12 -21 

COPADP i»1126 +.15 



1615 >J0 


EqPGI n 3955 +63 
Ecpil nx 1650 —25 
ISJllGv 9J8 —21 
LtBl n 10J6 —21 
FhWBy tovesb 
AarTT m 11 Jfl -4P 
AMorn 1667 +.02 


Infln p 9.91 
IntTrp 14.20 >26 
MMuniP 1613 —SO 
QuatGrp 1233 >4M 
Tetlnc5hpl3Jfl • .17 
TotRTflyp9.29 -22 
Vaiuep 11.70 >25 
Ftagship Group: 
AATEa P 1646 — JM 
AATEC P 1065 — 4M 


SmCciPG 1766 +.16 Income ?.6l -.02 

iSLT * " ™ iltBEfl 

AssetAli na038 —.04 io««Fwid: 

CTMun 951 —27 Bakmced nl 3J6 _ 


itt^fl 

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n 17J[ +.05 
nl£75 +.10 


CaPVcflA 1159 — JM 
CapVdBnl160 -24 

TO^ O t 9 45 -21 
'’SuKinAiaSr-Jb 

CTAAuA 1172 —25 
CtroGth 1527 —.01 


jeOl 2659 >69 
nadan 1773 >61 


COTEp 969 -22 


FL JEP 10 J I -23 
GATEAp 1028 -24 


... 2BI 11.72—1- 
15.75 +.10 FL MunA 14 J7 — JM 
1X40 —05 GtblnvA n 1526 —08 
8.13 _ GtblnvB I 1538 —08 

26.92 +.16 GnmoA 1327 >27 
13JB —30 GnmaBt 13JW —.03 
1120 — 26 MAMunA1151 — 25 


InstAstM n 9i 
iiwtEaltneJO 


NEurA D 1X98 — 2) InvIntTF n 9.99 -. 
NEurB n 1X71 —4)2 InvEqApp n9.93 + . 
NAGvA 839 +.12 lnvlntEan14J6 — 


NAGvBp 8 39 
NAGvC 839 
. PrGrihAplZ15 
PrGrlhBplXOS 

■ m « 

Techp 2930 
' Wldlncp 128 
WlOPrivBplO.9 

■ AmSoutli Funds: 

. Balance x 1127 


invIrrtEan 14.26 —09 
InvLGvt n 9.75 —21 
InvUtlln 950 
InvEqlx nelOJO +27 
oronAst n 2235 +58 


K>TEAp 1051 — JM 
KSTEO 938 —IM 
LATEAp I0J4 -24 
LtdTEo 1052— 22 


EqGrth x 1426 >.05 Ente rprn 2323 1 .14 I 
EqtValx 1X41 >.07 FedTxEx (16.66 — 24 j 
EaliKmnxIXOl— 24 FLxIncn 90S -22 
HiQBd 9 70 —26 Fundn 1957 t .05 
IrtlBd 9.77 -sn Grthtnc 1430 . 0? ! 
IntEqtn 1327 —.06 IntGvt 4.B5 —21 | 
LargeCo nl£19 ■ .02 Mercury 1354 1 .19 ! 
MAMun 9J8 -27 Overseas n 10 J0-26 
MuniBd 978 —.06 aiTmBdn 22? 

NY Mun 10J1 —26 Twain 23417 1 72 
STBdn 979 —21 Ventrn 5128 1 50 
SmailConiBJO Tjs .WrldW 2654 -27 
SmCoEqnlXI/ ..19 JwenFdn 11.97 -JO 
TE Bond nl0.26 —06 JPO)pAnorl633 > .15 
US Trees niaoo -23 JPIGg_ 921 - 03 
Utility x 921 —27 John Hancock: 
deway Funds: i CATE . 11J3 — 24 


Ealncm 11x1X61 —24 
HiQBd 9 70 —26 
IniBd 9.77 —22 
IntEqtn 1327 —.06 
LargeCo ntt.19 >.07 
MAMun 9.38 -27 
MuniBd 978 —26 
NY Mun 1021 -26 
STBdn 9.79 —21 
SmailConiBJO >75 


GNMA n 776 —21 
Gtobdne 1454 —12 
Goldfdnx 727 — 4M 1 
Gfhlncnx 1668 —01 ■ 
Inti n 11.15 —14 ; 
SI Govt n 9.74 —03! 
StSO 43ft 1 23 j 
Stlnv 137 
TEBdn 1028 -25 
WkJEm 5«S 
Jberty Fomrtv: | 

SE&&LJHS. •«! 


PhnxA 1X79 +.08 GvttocA 8.77 —.05 
Spvia 1£93 ‘JO incamestklo.il >JM 
StrDvA 1X87 > 23 locomeTr 9J7 —26 
ST GIA p 8.12 , 21 tncameA 9.28 —26 
TedlA £92 .417 TFIncA 9.48-23 
TXMA IIL33 — JM TFIncT 9.68 -.03 
WkflncA 844 . .01 VoJuGrA 1752 >.I6 
IftrnB Lynch B: VoluGrT 17.81 1 .16 

ArtRB 949—21 Nuveen Funds: 
AmertnB t 927 -27 CA InsR nxio.03 —.08 
AZMBl 10 J3 —04 CA VIR nxlOJM — 4)8 


WkflncA 844 
MftfriB Lynch B: 


ZopGrAaxlXOl —.0! . 
zalncAp 11.47 . 02! 

ISSSiL '-Sli 


x 1057 -26 
1x1057 - 06 
1973 -25 

ig-JM 

& 738 -02 


sa»asT8 sKrsa=i 

938—04 SWRWG 1479 1 .12 Growth P 16.12 1 .06 . Ut'lFdCI 10.93. -.05 . 


AZMBl 1073 —.04 CA VIR nx 1024 —4)8 
9olBI 11.91 ..04 FLValRnx9.73 —27 
BosVIBt 23.13 <.09 AMD VIR nx 939 —27 
ColMnBl 11.15 —05 MA lnsRnx9.BS —27 
CAIA6B 9J9 — 04 MA VIR n> 9 J 
lODEdSt 2724 1 4M Ml VoIR nx9.9 
CpHIBI 769—21 MuniBd x 
fflnvGdB 1023—04 HiMunRnr 
:p 1TBI 10.96 —03 NJVotR nx9 
JnwBP 17.78 .29 NYlnsRnxIi 
=uroBt 1521 -15 NYVlRnx1027 
=edS«B I 977 — 07 ONValRnW Ot 
-LMB t 9.66 —.03 PA VIP nx 9.77 —05 
rtJFTB t 14.40 -.12 VAVommc9.82-4)7 

.»JI 8Sft- M - w 
iSiS-26 


fiW™ 


^n " 20J0 T;?7 


I?1X41 +J 


nplZ38 +4)7 MuBdBt 1336-4)5 
10.12 -23 MumBdA 1335 —26 


Ecu.lyx 1£16 +27 
Gvnnx 925 —4)6 


■ ResEqx 1725 +.11 Bondn 9S7 -22 Stvtint 10.18 Growth p 39 JT —24 IntwGvtn 923 —22 

Atnanolnc 11» -.!2 EuuHvn IBM +29 5mCapVaM2Jl +.15 tncomep 1112 —05 inflGrln 1751-4)5 

• AmhosMdor Fid: Be«;HiM 28.73 +62 Composite Group: IrtvA 2053 +.13 InvGBn 7JM — 22 


. BascVi n 1£89 +23 GrilAp 11.92 

- Flxedln 939—02 GrIIB p 1128 
+ .71 ShtTmBdn920 -21 MunB 1X19 

- VI Inn 1102—4M Compass capital 
+ 4H BosaocnBol B297 —04 Eqtvtnco 1X25 

„ BayFundsInstt: Fxdbi 1022 

-21 ST Yield 923 — 2! Growth 1163 
-28 Bondn 957 —02 InttEq 1426 
+ 27 Equity 1023 -4)9 IntIFI 10J9 
-26 BnyFunds Invesh _ MunSd 1030 
-25 STYieldn 923—01 NJMun 1021 


IXI2 -23 
1£91 +.14 
1525 +.16 
11.92 +.12 


MumBdA 1335 — JM 
NC MuA 1230 —07 
NCMuBt 1X59 —07 
NY MunA 1195 — .08 
NYMuBt 1196 —07 
OH MuA 1230—06 
OHMuBl 1231 —05 


NCTEAP P X92 -M 
Diyerlnll n 1 2.43 —11 NMTEp 9.53—03 
DNGIhn 1255 +4)9 NY TE p 1072 — JH 
EmOGrorlgJS >68 OHTEApll^ — 23 

End Inc 335? **26 PATEAP 9.95-23 
EQtinx 1965 — 27 TnTEAD 1064 —.03 
Eqldx 1729 + 21 UtilAp 955 — 27 
ErCopApnll31— 14 VATEAp 1X19 — 4M 
Europe 2054 —12 Flex Foods: 
ExchFdnllB.92 +23 Bend np 1926 
HddFd 11x1X92— 02 Gblnpn 923 +4)3 
Fitly 11 JB +J3 Growth npllU +21 

GNMH 1X15—03 Muirfd pnf 528 
GtoBd 1033 —01 Fontaine n 1X95 +27 


AAlTEAp 11,18 — JM Ertsonp 24J7 

MOTEAP1033 -.03 GinHRtn 1153 —02 

Ml TEC pH. 17 -23 Gtonmede Funds: 
NCTEAp 9.92 —04 Equity n 1374 , .17 

NMTEp 9.53 —.03 IntGovn 9.9S 

NYTEp 1072—05 Inin 1471 —02 

OHTEA p 114)6 —.03 Munlnt n 9.99—23 
OHTECPllJJS — JM SmCap n 1458 ■ .06 
PATEAP 9.95 -23 OtreeinTA 9.61 -21 
TnTEAn 1X64 —03 GaidaioaUXBJU +.13 
UtilAp 955 —27 Gatoman Sachs Fmlr 
VATEAP 1X19 —24 AsiaGrtti 16.12 t .13 


1X96 '.07 
851 -21 


t t I) 

TEp 1155—06 us Gov X 857 —27 GtolSmB 


7.97 1.01 
7.93 i.03 


'SifiSf ^ scr 

8U5 #.13 StrlncB 6.97 —02 Fundn 

chsFmly; . TaxEx p _1023 —04 '^'1- 

1X12 > .13 J Hancock Freadnc LonBjfPf 
1664 +.15 AvTectl 1X24 —.02 UxigttSC 
1352 _ EnvmAp 868 —.12 Leomte! 

1X96 +.14 GlInBi 820 + 22 gandji 

1X99 —13 


GOitncx 1076 —05 
insMuni x 1076 —29 
TF Bond X IXI4 —28 
USGov x 857-27 

LTVUF IV p *974 —22 
UTTlTrmP|n|9[66 —.01 

Fundn M.01 1 M 
UtilO_ 1026 i.ll 
UxtglfPFn 1958 <28 
LongttSCn 1463 '50 


— Muni Inc 1367 -28 


1163 +28 
1456 >24 
1079 


TX MuA 2050 — .11 GroCo 29.05 +65 CopApp Z 


VAMuA 1579 —10 
VAMuBT 1579 —09 


1050 — 4)5 Drvvfus Stratetoc InsMunn T14W —sn 

1021 — JM GIGrp 3540— .19 IniBd n 9.96—02 
1X18 - Growtnp 39 Jl —34 inteGvtn 953 —22 


Bond n 977 —4)2 
EstCoGr nl630 +.20 
Growtnn 12 87 +.09 

. laxsikn 1116 +J» 
iniBonan 953 —01 
IMIStk n 1373 —28 
- SmCoGr nl4 04 +J3 
. Ambassador inv: 
Bondn 9.27 —.02 
EsiCoGrnl6J8 -70 


JeacHiM 28.73 +62 Composde Group: tnvA 

3SEmoDbtx8.93 1— JM BdSIkAp 1170 - JnvBt 

Sonchmark Funds GwthAp 1X89 +4M DuftPEnR 
Balanced n9.97 +4)7 inFdAp 867 —23 

BondA n 1859 — 25 NW5QAP1698 +25 
DivGrAn 1X48 +27 TxExAp 757 — 22 
EaldxAn 11.02 +27 USGvA p 923 —OS 
FocGrA n taxi +4M Conestoga Funds: 

IntlBdAn 3®L0B -.09 Equity 15J7 +.11 

IntIGrAn 1074 —03 Incm 9.94 —02 

ShtDurn toJW .. UaMat 1056 

SffldAn 1979 + 23 Conn Mutual: 




DuW&iRnlSS 

DupraeMutuafc 

l^n" £§=£ 

KYSMJi 117—01 
EBI Funds: 

Equity p 6150 +51 
Flexo 5450 +25 
Income p 464» —04 
Mulfflxp 4X22 +26 
ESC Shi nA 973 —21 


Japan nr 1422 —I! 
LatAmr 1674 +jd 
L tdMun 978 —24 
LowPrr 16-50 +.m 
Ml TF n 1172 —JS7 
MNTFn 1055 —04 


Magellan 6957 +1.00 
MKtind nr 34.97 +73] 
MATFn 11.08 —07 
MidCapn 114)9 +78 
M>pe5ecnl060 —sn 
Muncrt n 727 —27 
NYHYn 1151 —.10 
NYTnsn 11.10—08 
NewMktn)X86 +.11 
NewMIll 1266 +75 


Grwth n 1225 + 29 SmColA 1151 +.15 Govt 9.97 —22 ESCShlnA 973 — 

incaBdn 929 — .02 USGvA n 1958 - Grwth ISJ7 +.12 Eaton V Classic: 

tolBondr* 953 — .01 _USTldxAnl9.T6— 03 Income 961 +21 China P 971 +. 


tol Bondn 953 —01 USTldxA tl 19.16— 03 Income 9. 
mitSttcn 1370 —.08 EsnSwm Group: TctfRet 14, 

MITFBdn 9.15 — . 04 AdiGavn 9.47—4)2 CGCapMJdF 
SmCoGr nlj.01 +72 CaTFln 1076 —4)2 EmaMkfnX 

. TFBdn 9.99-23 CaTFln n 9.56 -JH IntrFxn 726—21 

TFintBdnlO II — 4U CaTFSn 10.09—21 IntiEqn 1066—01 

Ambassador Ret A: ColTFH n 195 —03 tottFxn 878 *M 

Bond! .977 — M CalTFLn 10.72 —04 LoGrwn 9.98 +.11 

EstCaGr 1X27 +J0 EoGron 1273 +.10 LoValn 973 

Grwth 1225 ♦ 419 EurBd n 1063 —.08 MtgBkd n 75l —21 

InJBond 9 J3 —.01 GNMAn 1X10 —.03 Munin 729 —4)7 

inftStk 1370 —29 Goldin n 1194 +22 SmGrwn 1320 +66 

SmCoGr 14 02 +J3 IncGron 1493 +28 SmVol n 9.00 +.02 

TFimBdJ 10.11 —03 L Trees n 8.73 —26 TtIRtnn 777 —01 


Bond* .9J7 —SO 
EstCaGr 1X27 ♦ JO | 
Grwth 1225 +419 
Inffiood 9J3 —21 
InftStk 1370 —29 
SmCoGr 14 02 +J3 
TFimBdr 10.11 —03 
Amoare Vintage: 

Equity 1074 +.06 
Fxlncn 924 —.01 
. totdl TF 928 —.02 
Artier AAdvanThisfl: 
Baton n 1266 
Grlncon 1431 
IntlEqfy n 1 2.93 —.0? 
LidTrmn 973 —01 
AmerCopdt* 

CmsJA px 1£9S —24 


NTTFIn 1052 — 22 Cootey n 1963 — 29 
NTTFLn 11.13 —.04 coreFunds: 

STTreasn 9.73 — 21 BatonAn 1X18 +413 


Torl99Sn9£02 +40 
Tor2000 n 67.19 —77 
TartOOS 114566 —60 
TarMWn 3157 —54 
Tar2015nZ254 —74 
Tar2020n 1X18 —16 
TNoten 9.97 —m 


Eqldx 2178 +.11 
GIBdA n 9.00 —22 
GrEqAn 923 +.05 
IntBdAn 9.63 —.01 
inttGrA n 1326 — o& 
ValEqB Dnl355 +26 
JOwenqpA 1372 +.17 


China P 971 +23 
FLLIdP 965—03 
Govtp 973-22 
NaflLMp 968— JD 
NottMun p 9JK —26 
takm v ManmoM 
CALWt 9.94 —24 
China! 1X41 +23 
indat 1156 +25 
FLLtdt 1022 -24 
MALtdt 9.90 — .(M 
MlUdt 959— .04 
MatlLtdt 10.07 —24 
NJLtdl 977 —23 
NYUdt 9.98 —25 
PALtdt 1X03 —05 
ALTxFI 1X02 —.08 
AZTxF I 10.17 —.07 
ARTxFt 9.96 -417 
CciMurrit 953 —.07 
COTxF t 9.78 —.08 
CTTxFt 921 — 4B 
Ealn tx 1X20 —23 
FtaTxFt 1052 —09 


drrtoinen 1X95 +27 SetEq 1X06 +28 GIlnA 

Fiducrp 3051 +50 ShrtTF 927 —.01 S 0 *™ 

QbGrthp U65 +.16 ST Gov 929 — 21 
GovTRp .72? —4)3 GovStBnd 2X37 —22 RaBKA H.92 
Grwth P 2X77 +53 GvtEqtvn 2362 +71 , RoBkB t _2221 
WYldp 8.02 — JH Gavett Funds: JHaww* 

TF MN 1X14-22 DvIpBd 859 + 24 ArtlA 
TF Nat 1067 —04 EmgMk 17.98 —A3 AChBt 
USGvt 824 — JD GlGvln X63 —02 BalAp 
VTOms Invsh bitlEga 1164 —75 galBp 

AcWtt 950 — 21 PftSta 1X10 +.01 gondA O 
Bondr 9J1 _ Smd>se 1665 —79 Bo«B 

EqirtcFS 11166 +21 GradSaa McDanoM: nyAp 

GJStm 852 — 23 EsfVal pn 2262 +27 nvgP. 
Munlnct 1056 —415 Govlncp 1X32 — 02 USGvA P 
NYMunlt 9.91—25 OHTFp 1267 —4)7 ,USGv6t 
pHFartp 1026 -4M OupVaTp 1855 +.07 J&VBal 
Utflr _ 1X22 —05 GHMNTE 9.72 —07 KSMun,. 


’lit :js 


GtoBd n 958 - 25 
Growtnn 1175 >29 
Gr&lnn 1X19 +21 
IntlEq n 1X13— 4M 
SmCap n 1353 +.12 


GllnA 821 +.03 
Gtobfix 1656 -25 

8SST ’SS t:S 

GaJdB I 14.97 + 4)2 
Pafflas 1526 —12 
PocBasB 1£80 —13 


J Hancock Sovergn: 1 
AchA 1X15 +22 


iffl iS-51 
7 $ iZ&sas*-" 

+.11 Affiltdp 11.02 +.10 


1X09 +417 
1DJ5 +22 
1074 +22 
p 1X16 —24 
1X16 —m 
1473 +25 
14JI +25 
P 957 -24 


BondDebp9.15 +22 
DevetGth plOJO +71 


DeveGth plOJt 
Eq 1990 p 1476 
FaValup 1153 
GiEqp 1X94 


GJincp &14 
GovtSecp X66 —01 
TaxFrp 1X69—4)7 
TFCTp 9.78 —26 
TxFrCatpl076 — 07 


-.05 GIBdBt 9.14 _ COPAnpAi 

-29 GICvSI 1X78 -26 EmGrthAnS. 
-28 GtRsBl 1676 1 21 Gov1SecAn9. 
-27 GtolSmB 11020 -21 WVaTxAn9, 

m\ !H?T^8SS?i n S: 

-.17 GlHdB 1372 —.06 OcsanTEplOJ 
23 LotAmB 1859 < J4 OWtEmMk 
.13 MAMBI 1076 —05 Ottiltiyn 
.11 MIMuBt 9 A3 —.03 OWIritl 
28 MNMBt 1X17 -4Q CXdDomin 
50 MnlnsBt 7.84—4)3 OtymttcTh 
MnLtdBI 9.86 . Balanced 

25 MutrnS 922 —22 Ealncm 

25 MNatIB I 104)3 -24 Inti n 
J» NJAABI 1050 —22 LowOurn 
21 NYMnBI 1076— JH OneGfPUP: 

-4M NCMBt 9.99— JM AselAllp 
.13 QHMBt 1051 -23 BlueCEq 

ORMuniB 1973 —24 DscVc* 

.01 Pacflt 2174—16 Bund* 

-23 PAMBI 1024 —03 GvAnr.n 
■21 PtUlkBI 1X54 +4)7 GvBdp 
ST GIB I X12 +21 IncEq 
.10 SpviBt 1567 +4)9 IncameBd 
412 SfrDvBI 1224 +.02 Int^l 
71 TeChBI £M +.07 Inflf 

26 TX MB t 1X33 —04 IntlEqn 

4)5 UtilnBt 7.94 —29 LbCoGt 
■ 28 WldlncBt 864 -21 LoCoVd 
21 Mentman Fds: Ltvai 




n IX 
ppn21Jt 




LP2020 J-W 
S&PWOn 1057 


Aaartnn 7.13 
CorwFdnxllU— 18 


MinnTFn 923 

Tax Free n 9 .m 


Ann S.98 — JS.j 
sh burst:. _ .. 


CacwFdnxllU— 18 

Futidn* 1760 +.J0 

^ W 2i?7T3i 

NY TE n 9.81-4)5 

^; n n li-S 


. , 2 1 USGvt nx 1024 -71 

ii feslHs! L’ssrts :a 

»! seoFn ]Y-+1 — M 1 




< Star Finds: 


llrNGUP 17.04 — T4 
WrkhncA p8.18 +21 


S USGov D 421 —.03 


a S3^3i^ -.»! 

esu M-i! 

Munin 8.19— 02 

rirac laii +55 


1 r81A61 + 179 UghtvA ( 


EnjrovA 1128 

NYTFC 723 — S 1 AOntt-T n ?.M —416 


723 —23 
P 870 + 2? 
8.66 +29 


[ Sir Moor 978 

SWB dm an Finite _ 
’ Amman iJJ +.m 

■ Aasocn .78 +22 

Invest n 1.14 - 

I Oceangn 1.79 —40 

: SJeinRoeFte „ 
j CapOpp n 3223 *J0 

I Gvrtncn 962 —23 

HyMunn 11.00 —.05 

1 neomen 9J1 — .03 


AWnLTn 9.M— 06 
AdmSTn 924 - 

Asset An 1374 +/Q 
Convt n 1166 +23 


Ealnc n 1356 _ 

iSntorern*6Jp +69 
Morgan n 1X07 +.14 
PriPCOn 2056 +73 

§^n n 

STTsrv n 9.98 —21 
STFedn 9J9 —ai 


Inttn 1024 +24 
LtdMlnn 959 — 21 
MgcWUin 865 —.04 


STCorpn 1X49 —ill 
(TTiryn 9.B* — M 

LTTsry n 9.17 —.05 


Pr&rwEnnU76 +.10 
SCKtn 2375 +.12 
Stockn 2X96 +71 


LTCoron Xl5 — 4E 
HY Caron 757 _ 


Stockn 2X9X +71 
TottRetn 2£99 +.M 
Yitghwn 1077 +.71 


StoPrttoeFtmte 

GavSecn 929 —03 


HY Caron 757 
Prefan X66 —OS 
LdxTnfBn 9^ —03 
IdxSTBh 9 71 —21 
IdxlTBn 959 —04 
IdxBat 1X73 +.OJ 
wSoan 4456 +59 
IndxExtn 1966 +.17 


IdxTatn 1124 +29 
IdxGron 1X47 +.13 


«« SKJS 


Stratton Funds 
DMdendn23.94 — .11 
Growthn 2X91 +28 
SmCap nx26JS1 +.18 
Strang Funds 


ldxEurn 1277 —419 
wxPocn 11^ —23 


idxtosfn 4521 +7? 
MuHlYdnlOJO —25 
Munilntn T2JM —JO 
MuLtdn 1053 —02 

AAuLPnonlOAd— -Oi 

Multwn 1121 —23 
MunSht n 15.44 —01 
CAIrtsJTn 9.99 -22 
CAInsLT nl051 — 4M 
PL limn 1X17—03 


MTn Ts-Oll 


14J2 —.12 
1x856 1 23 


AsiaPacnlQT? — 25 

SS 8 ;:ii 

GovScn 924 —24 
Growthn 1159 +.16 
HiYIMU 964 —04 
Incan 9.47 —.03 
InsMun 7053 —05 




man VMS —Of | . OHmsn 1022 — .m 
invstn 1869 +J» PAimn ioab — 03 


invstn 1869 + 22 PAlnsn 10JJ — 03 
MuniBd n 954 —03 SPEnrar £M —01 
OpoTnryn 29.68 +.14 SPGoidr MJ9 — .12 
STBondn 9 J0 —21 SPHtthr 3757 +.12 
STMunn 1X01 -.M SPUttl 1XM . _ 

Total n 2479 +J8 USCron 1554 >72 
SummitHY 9.91 -.01 iniiSr ltis — 06 
SuaAinfrica Fds Wrflsiyn 17.96 —06 

BdAsetAplA95 +24 WeHmn 20 41 + JM 
BalA5«teplA8ft +23 Write n 1466 +24 
BlueOiioBT£71 +JM Wndsll 1.753 —02 
DivIncB p 451 —02 Verdure Adwans: 
FedScSp 957 — E4 IncPI 491 
HHncAp 772 —.02 Mum nt 9.10 - 

HBncBp 773 —02 NYVen 122—01 
MidCopA P14.08 > 72 RPF 0 1 5.92 —.02 

SmCaSrA 19.01 +66 RPFGR 1522 -.03 


SmCoGrB 16-90 +66 
TE InsA p 1 156 -SII I 


TEInsB (1417 —01 victory Funds 
UfevA X17 -.02 AoarGr 


1158 +.02 
1664 —05 


USGvA X17 -412 
USGvBo 817 —02 
TARGET: „ 

mterBdn 9.76 —03 
mtBandn 958 
mnEqn 1457 —.18 
LoCapGrnlOJM +26 
LoCapv 1X44 +23 


9.72 » .12 
9.17 -Jn 
1063 +.10 
9 Jfl —4)3 


Growth 1070 + 28 
Income 9.56 * .01 


1X17 —.04 
12.67 —.03 


RrtRBdftsf —M 


6.91 -24 
7.D2 — JM 
6.59 


AdiUSIV 6.74 — JM 


6X9 — 4M 
651 —04 
4.94 —04 
656 —.04 
668 — 4M 
659 —23 
1255 —21 
621 —21 


MagCdP 1X18 +.02 


AstADnl 1151 +21 
CapAppMlJU +4M 
FiaxBdnf 10JM 
Grtnf 1121 +22 


MMII 
rp 

Funds: 
BalGrAn 
EqAaAn 
EaGrAn 
EqlnA 
FxdlnA ' 


760 —02 
£72 — 4)2 


SmCivG 1159 *79 
SmCapV 1X16 

TotRtBd 962 —25 
TIFFInvPne 
. Bond 9.06 -.04 
EmgMk i 11.08 1.11 
SnllBtty 106/ 1 .02 
USEalv 1X50 1.O8 


9.67 —04 ShtGvmn 9.58—4 
1159 * 79 I Victory Porftofew; 


Balance 960 —27 
DvrsIdSI 1254 —.01 
Intmlnc 957 —4)2 
tnttGr 12.97 -.01 
mvOIBd 9.24 —01 
Ltd In 9.97 -.01 
OH Muni W63 -.02 
OH RegSt 1484 >.14 
SpIGrSfr. 9.42 1 24 


AmerTrr 14 73 :25 SpiGrSfr. 9.42 1 24 

CapAcc 16.18 SptVcrtue I860 >25 

DevMklp 15.19 1 25 5klnx 10.19 1 26 

Forgnp 104)6 >21 USGvlMt 1050 -21 

GtobOpp 1186 1 .nil value lOJi 122 

Growth p 1895 i.04 Vision Fund*: 


, B JS ffUVJ 
sgffisrifgJA v^te 8 "- 03 

crnp SrtB ti insMg* ’• 1 BalA 11.30 * 04 


f gfiOJA 

painttr* " * 

FESOfS H64 ! [DO 

rhrtdAvV 1805 ' !w 
nsamsanGraupc 
EqlnA 1X64 . .18 
GwttlA 2267 153 
I MIA 1321 —26 
OOOTA 39.00 1 73 
PrcMtA 1351 -JO 
ToraetA 1350 |J7 
USGvA 874 —05 


audypnllM 
ovine 1878 
rlnc 3061 


GwWshp 15.17 -22 


GrlnBr 3X47 


IntlEoA 12.36 —.04 
NYTF 11.16—05 
STBdp 9.96 >.01 
TF man 1151-27 


1X60 r.19 Votomet 


Grwth B 1 21.97 1 52 Voyagaur Fte 
rncomeB r 755 —04 AZins 1054 — JM 

IntlBf 1263 — M COTF 10® —.07 


OporB 123.17 +70 
PrecMetBlX94 —JO 
ShlGvB 959 —412 
TaxExBI 1176 —09 
TnrpetB 1352 +56 
USGovBt 871 —24 
TlwrabuniFte 


Cadi A 958 —26 
FL Insd 9.99 —07 
GroStkp 1829 +.11 
lATt 94)8— 05 

MNins 104M -26 
Mifintot 1070 —.04 
MinnTF 1152 —415 


956 -JM 464 -23 MatUto StateSt 


134)9 +.12 
1172 —23 


TFMO P 692 —24 
TFNJ p 699 —Jn 


44 Wall Eq 6.15 —21 GHNaTTE 10!04 —04 1 « IMunLI 1156 —03 TaxNYp 1062 —28 


Fonim Funds: 


InvBnd 16.08 — 23 
ME Bud 1050—04 


PTC 2421 +62 Founders Groups I 
OhTFn 11.02—07 Bal no 9.10+23 


TaxSvr 1053 —23 


Groansnmo 1451 —4)3 Kaufman np 164 +27 
Grffflnprln 1162 +4M Kenroor F unds A: 
Guanfian Funds: AdftovA _|51 _ 


CmsJA px 1£98 —24 Utillnco n 924 — 06 CowenJGrA W.91 — .17 GATxFt 965 —26 
CnwBpvl64m . Berger Group: Oabbe Kusofu GovtObtt 952—02 

CDBO0P 653 -03 lOOpn 16.07 +51 AstAUp 1113 +4)6 Hllnct 7.06 

CarpBflA P6.52 —02 101 on 11.66 -.13 Eqyiryp 1672 +73 KYTxFt 967 -J? 

EmGrC P 2461 -.37 _SmCoGrnpX72 +26 OR MunNIXIS — 25 LATxFI 9^1 —27 

ernsMnPte 


Ovrsea n 2921 —22 
PacBosn 1927 —13 
Puritan 1£52 +21 
RertEsfn 1363 +21 
RetGrn 1878 +.13 
SWTBdn X96 +21 
STWldn 950 +21 
SmollCaP 1079 +.14 
5E Asia nrl4.96 +.11 
StkScn 19.77 +54 
StrOPpt 2062 +.12 
Traian 5960 +J2 
USBin 1X16 — JB 
umttyn 1453 —14 
Value n 4461 +29 

FSa^Seb^'-" 

Airr 1473 —54 
AmGotor2XS4 +4M 
Aufor 2X44 +.06 


BlueChp np6J5 +27 Pc 
Discvp 1966 + 55 SR 
Fmtrnp 27.19 +51 To 
GovSec 892 -4M Ui 
Grwth np 1255 +.12 HTli 
Passprtn 1070 —21 HTfi 


iuartfian Funds: 
AstAltoc 1054 +28 
GBGIntl 1363—10 
Baton 1167—01 
PskAv 2BJ2 +50 
Slock n 2874 +JD 
ToxBe 9.13 —21 
USGovI 960 —sn 
TinsEq px13415 +JM 
TMoFI PX 977 —27 


AdfGovA 851 
BlueChpA1262 +4)6 
CrtMTxA 7.13 —22 


965 —06 
450—03 
476 -22 
4.70 -.03 


TFWAp 4JS — 04 


2062 +.12 GovtSec 
5960 +J2 InUEoly 
1X16 — 23 MklCaD 


CorpBdApfl.52 —02 101 on 

EmGrCo 2461 -.37 SmCoGr 
EGAp 2466 *58 BemsMn 
EmGrB p 24 12 -56 GvShDu 
EntAp 1X34 +.16 ShIDurr 
EntBp 1X23 -.16 IntDurn 
Entc P 12JB -.1ft CaMun 
EatylncAp*i45 _ DivMun 
EolncBlx 564 . NY Mun 


ermMnPte Spec, of n 1324 +.14 

GvShChj n 1X38 — 21 CrostF unds Trait: 
ShtDurn 1X36—21 Baton 953 —04 

IntDurn 1257 —.05 siBdn 962 —82 

CaMun 1X09 —05 SpEan 1155 +.13 


IntDurn 1159 —25 Si fid n 962 —82 
CaMun 1X09 —05 SpEan 1155 +.13 
DivMun n 134)2 —OS Value n 1 157 +25 
NYMunn 13413 —25 VAMun 970 —27 
InffVal n 16.92—12 CuFaArfln 9.92—01 


tiryp 1672 +.13 KYTxFt 967 -27 
Mun N1X1 5 —25 LATxF I 023 —27 
darn 1364 +.14 AADTxFt 967 —.08 
Funds Trust: MATxFt 1025 — 24 

ton 953 — 24 MiTxFr 1X02—27 
dn 962 —82 AANTxFt 965—06 
ian 1155 +.13 MSTxFt 9.16—06 


BiatoChr 25.40 +55, 
Broker r 1625—06 
Chetnr 3575 + 74 1 


Spedpn 7_58 +.05 Han Itn Cato 9.07 
widwGrp 1SL54 +21 Haaover lav Fds: 

Fomdobi Square Fdc BJChGrl 1X2S +68 
Botanced 9JB +22 STGvl 958 —21 

GavtSec 9J6 —21 SmChGri 1078 +.17 

InUEoty 965 —25 USGvt 961 —03 

MWCao 1066 +.05 Harbor Funds: 

OftioTF 969 -21 Bond 1062 —01 

QuolBd 9.44 —23 CopApp n 1678 +76 

QikrtGr 969 +4)2 Swfiin 1279 +.11 

Frankfln Groupc inti n 2656 +4M 

AGEFdp 266 +4)1 InttGrn 1167 — 26 

AdiUSpx 954 —03 ShtDan 864 +21 

ARS 975 —02 Value n 1357 +413 


DivincoA £84 +21 . ValuApppl22? +28 
FLTkA 9.98—4)3 LutoWf Bn* 

GttttncA 867 +24 BroHIYd 8.94 
GrthA 1X17 +.15 pund 1771 +.1* 
HTYieid 7. B0 +22 income | -23 
InCapA 824 -412 Mirt 813 —04 
InttA 10.99 —24 ..Qiygf . 1060 + 51 
MuniA 9.79 —22 MASRjnte 
NYTxA 1058 —24 Balanced tl 1161 +21 
OHTFA 961 -23 &nerGrnl661 
Reiiml 11.14 +25 pqway n 2169 
Reffnfl 1272 +.02 Fxdtolln log 
Retire! 10.19 +21 Fxdlncn ixra 
Retire* 9.07—21 gj®"" «- § 

Retires 857 - GJFxIn 1X17 

SIGovA 827 Z HYtasn X96 
SmCBEaA £90 +29 JjHU 

TechA 1X92 +50 InttFlton ia02 
TXTFA 1021 —03 LtdDurFlnlO.il 
TolRelA 9X6 +.06 MRfikFC 9.99 
USGovtA 851 —01 MunFW 10^ 
USMIBA 666 . PAFtohn 032 

Kemper Funds Be 

DvfncBt 564 +21 SeiFIn 966 
GtablncB 868 , Sn^nVln 17.94 

GrthBt 1113 +.l3 SfFln 11^ 

GrlhC 1113 +.1S , Value n 1268 
HilTdBf 7.79 +21 WS 
InttR 1X98 —24 AAJTAp 167 

5m£tr XfiS _ MIGAp 128 
SmCapfit 568 +29 BondAp Z& 
TedlB 1029 +70 EmGrAp 979 
TctfRtBf 973 + 25 GrftoAp 176 
ToIRtC 9J4 +26 GvLJ* O 859 
USMtgBt 665 — 01 GvMflAP 665 


EmerGrn1661 +52 
Equity n 7169 +28 
Fxdtoll n 1X43 —23 


AL TF p 1154—26 HavenFd ntlX68 +JB 
AZTFp n.05— 04 Hearttand Fds: 
Bcflnvmc 2358 +4M USGvtp 9.10—04 


Campr KL69 + 1.M CAHYBdp959 — 06 , 
ConPrt r 1453 —21 J Colins p 1172 —07 


EalncCp* 5.4J _l IntO/aln 16.92 —12 CuFdArfln 9.92—01 
ExchFd U ft. 15 — 72|BerwynFdnlX80 +68 CuFdSTn 957 —21 


SPEan 1155 +.13 MSTxFt 9.16—06 
value n 1157 +25 MOTxFt 1023 -29 
VAMun VJ0 —27 \ NJTxFt 1073 —07 


FdMBA p HIM 
FMO0P 1225 
GlEaAB 1220 
GIEqBpn 11.75 
GIEqCnp 11.89 -21 
GtGvA P B24 —21 
GiGvBpn 8.08—01 


_)Berwynmcnll60 -4» Cutler Trust 
.. iBhjfudMCSHJO +.16 ApvEan 1X36 +413 
_ ,Btttmor« Funds: Eqiyinco n 9,9B +.03 


NYTxFr 1052— .18 
NaflMunt 969 — 4M 
NCTXFt 922 —.06 
OHUdf 968 —05 
OHTxFt 10.13 —07 


Balanced J0J4 +.04 1 GavtSec n 960 —JO 2 ORTxF r 968 -28 


ConPrdr 1455 —21 
CsIHour 1855 +.14 
DtAeror 1853 +.17 
DevComrIXli +50 
EJearr 1X66 +55 
Energy r 17J1 
EnoSvcr 1228 + 59 
Envtror 1B69 +.10 
FinSvcr 5422 -SO 
Foodr 3177 *M 
Heanhr 7353 —4)2 
HomeF 2763 +J» 


CAhtfermUTl —04 
CaTFrp 7.04 —JB 
OOTFp 1175—06 
CTTFp 1X63—05 
Cvtsecpx 1145 —.02 
DMTCp 102S +.10 
Equity P 6.92 +2? 
Eqlnc PX 1471 — JM 1 
FbT ARS P9.76 — 22 


_ _W1 TxF 964 —25 

Hercules Fund: 


Euro VI n 1055 —13 
LAmVai m 161 +74 
NAmGrfniai7 +.17i 
PcfBVatn1X65 —09 
WartdBdn 9X0 —412 1 
Hejll use PUnds: ' 

Ct£2pppl£17 —61 , 


mtenrt063 —.04 Divine p 965 +21 KmtFundS: 


CapAoA 966 + 77 UlCOrNC 
CaoApB 979 +77 OppeniMlfni 
CooApC 9.93 +77 Asset Ad 
E qmcA 1X98 +26 CATEAp 
EqlncB 10.97 +4M ChDHYP 
EaincC 10.9a +JM DiscFdP : 
EqlnvstA 1276 +4B DiscovBI! 
EqlnvCp 1262 +4G EqlncAp 
GovSecA 665— 02 EqlncB f 
HlIncA 628 _ Gtao p 

HilncB 626 _ GCrp 

JriiiEjqAp 1097 —09 GtobEnvp 
inlifcqB 1X93 —29 GfObOlAp: 
IntjEqCp 1120— 09 Globffl t ! 
IntlFxIn f ms. +23 Goldp 
MfldAstB 879 +® HiYldA 1 
MgdAstA B23 +24 HiYTdBr I 
ModAstC 863 + 23 InSTEAp 1 
TaxExA 774 —24 mtrTE P 1 
TxExB 774 —24 InvGrAp I 


IntmGvA n 974 —01 
NJMuAn 1X22 —03 
STInvA n 9.97 
PitotlnlEB 16.14 
PtlatlntEAn16.19 
PteMwFumfc 
AmlncaTr p964 —4)3 
Bondp X95— 04 

Eqlnc PX 16 M —12 
CopGrp 1X91 +78 
Goict 8 . SM —24 

Growth p 122S +78 
Income px 961 —16 


Numeric 164)3 +77 
+JM BasNumO 1671 +78 
965 —04 Quest Far VOtoe: 

974 —01 CATE la-ffl — 23 


ntMu 1279 —02 | MO Ins 971 —05 

LtdTTn 1167 _ NattTF 974—06 

LtdCal 1268—02 NMTFA 10.17 

LtdGvtp 12.88 —412 ND TF 1079 —03 


LtdMun p 1372 —JS2 USGv 9.68—04 
NM Int 1277 -22 USGavY n 968 -24 
Tocauev M71 +.12 WaAMHJtad: 

Tower Funte TotRet 1144 +.13 

CopApp 1368 +.12 Growth 14,99 +.18 
LA Mu n. lDJD —22 UdTerm 965 —21 
TotnIRat 951 —02 Muni 10.03 —4)7 
USGv 962 -4)2 Global 954 +21 
Trademark Funds: WaUSt 757 +.12 

Equity n 1862 +412 Wdihurg Pfncas: 
Gaytmoon9.16 —03 CopApp n 1457 +.13 


Euromp 1964 -23 
PjonrFdpx 2359 +4)2 
PtnMBdplOJW -.03 
InttGr 2192 +.16 
Pionrilp 1972 +.13 
PJoThreep2Xl7 +.16 
ST Inc 322 


Fxdlncn 1X93 —23 MIMuInc 1066 —04 
Gbffialn ixio +4)2 Midwest: 

GJFxIn 1X17 +27 AdiUSGvl 966 -JM 
HYJecsn X96 , Govtp 972 —03 

IntlEqn 1461 > InJGvp 10.19 — .(W 

InltFIxIn 10.02 +J» OH TF 11 71 —04 

LtdDurFI nld.19 _ TFIntp 1068 —22 
MlgBLFc 9.99 —24 TreasTR X40 —04 
MunFxl 1070 _ UttRv 1056 — JM 

PAFxInn 1052 —4)2 Mawttax 1570 +70 
SdSon 1768 +.14 MonattMC 1272 —14 
SeiFIn 926 -40 Monitor Funds: 
SmCoVlnl7.94 +.10 FxInT x 3028 —16 


GIGrp 
GtobEnvp 
GtobcdAp: 
Globfflt ; 
Goldp 
HiYldA 1 
HiYTdBr I 
InsTEA p l 
mtrTEP 1 
InvGrAp I 

MnSCA 1 
MsmcGrA 
M5inGrCtt 
MtolncA 1 
NYTaxAp' 


2X12—06 
3X43 +73 
3X00 +52 
2564 —24 
1854 + 22 


wnthREixli^^a 
Piper Jafinnr: 

Baiancp 11.96 +22 
BnerGr 1964 +78 
Govtn 852 —05 
Grtlto 1064 +.05 
■nsiGv a.14 —05 
InstGvAdi 964 —21 
MNTE 1060 — 23 
Naims 1X32 —04 
PacEurG 1574 — 27 
Sectorp 1761 +.13 
Vcdjw p 1977 +25 
rJD 952 — 4M 
_ rShO 964 —02 
PlarUTNtx 10.12—4)1 
Portico Fds: 

BqlKn 2X1? +.14 


1153 —03 

1X88 +21 


GrwthTx 2X72 +77 
blEOT X 2264 —22 


NYTOXAp 
NYTxBtnl 
Oppen 1 
PATE Apl 
SoedAp 2 
StrlncAp 
StrincBt 


MJTAp 167 +21 ... 

MIGAp 1J® +.16 SIBdTx 1469—11 
BandAp 252 —04 MontrGIdp 7.J6 — 04 
EmGrAp 979 +61 ManitrSIp 174Q +.11 

8 S 5&8 & +1, i ^m^+jo 

GvMgAp 675 —21 GtabQjm 1561 +JM 
GvScA p 9.13 —m Oabqppn 1477 +414: 
HHncAp 49B +.01 Growthn 1X58 +416 
LtdMAp 7.10 . lnflSmCapB.ll —01 

OTCAp 879 +.14 ShDurGf 977—22' 
RscJiAp 1X16 +72 SmCapn 17.19 +.13 


MtoBkx 750 —OP 

Oh TFT x 2120 —.11 ( 


Equity 1067 +26 Da Investor-. 

Eqlndcx 1067 +JH Equity 1078 +.13 
Fixedlnc 9.16—4)2 Gavtlncn 955—02 


PATxFt 10.15 —.07 
RrTxFt 9.16—07 
STGblt 853 + 21 


IndEqor 20.10 +77 FLTFInp 970—10 

inaMolr 2360 +75 FLTFp 1174—25 


2060 —02 
4020 + 72! 


GATFp 1165—05 
QGvIncpxBJM —22 I 


incGrp 1164 +21 
LMGOVP 9.12 
jm<ta pS plX31 +75 
mtiMarkFtnte 
Balance n 921 +22 


ExEalnst 1324 +.18 
ExEalns 1323 +.18 
Fxdlnlte n952 —22 
toxEqin 1178 +418 


SfJnGrAp 

StrlnvAp 

5 

^ A P P 1 
TotRtAp 
TotRtBtn 
USGvtp 
ValStAp 1 



Bdldx 2X12 —06 
Eqlndx 3361 +72 
Grfncn 2377 +26 
IntSdM 976 —02 
NUdGrf.n2165 +.15 
STBatonlX07 —01 
SpGfn 3X82 +66 
TxEmBdn9.91 — 4M 


Preferred Grows 
Asset An 1055 +21 


AstAUA l 
CATF A 1 


iSsEtonst M77 +27 1 SectAP 1365 +5* | . .IteEMkt te46 + 79 1 MuincA 1 


ESCX)RTS & GUIDES 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


• WNDON 'MALE ESCORT 

SERVICE 

CAIL:071 -486-3259 

FRANKFURT £ AREA 


BELGRAVIA 


(Continued From Page 12) 


StlnAp 756 +23 More Start Fds: 
TotRAp 1X95 _ AsJanGrA I8J2 +.12 

UtnAp 7,07 — 24 AsianGB 182a +.12 

VdhiAP 1X43 +70 GtobEqA 1267 —.01 
WoAstAUA 156 1 +24 GtoOEqBnlX34— 02 
WoEoAp 17.13 +25 Morgan Grantee: 


Mara s Escort Agency. 
Please CaH 069 - 597 66 66. 


ORCHIDS 

U3NOON PAI05 GENEVA ZUHCH 
ESCORT AGBKY 
CKEDtT CAHDS WELCOME 


UK 071 589 5237 


CHB 5 EA ESCORT SERVICE. 

51 Beavchamp Place. Lantei SW3. 

Td: 07\ -584 6513 




Escort Agency 
Amsterdtxn +2 


MADISONS 

LONDON -MRS -COtOGNi 

Esaxt Service ■ Crtdrl Cords Acceptod 

UK0/1266O5W 


•• ZURICH VtOLEF ■* 
Etaotf Semice. Crwft eordt aaaptod. 
Teh 077 / 63 83 32. 


ZLOKH/ UICERNE/ ZUO 
MONA Brad Semite 
Tel. 077 / 41 16 13 


*PAIIS X LONDON* 

■ELEGANCE* 

Ewart Service London 711 3P4 5145 


GENEVA e GLAMOUR • PAMS 
BASEL •EscortAs'icr* K2/346 O0» TOKYO EXECUTIVE 


TOKYO TOP far TOP brorii 


Escort ServicB. Craft oardk 

Tab 0374797170 


Amderdom +31706975DB6 

* SOME ** ESCORT SERVICE 
London Hedhrow Gdwd 
Tetorfme: WMg4 626B77 
TOKYO”' ESCORT S8MCE 

Wqor credl oath a c cept e d . 

T«fe (03) 3436^^8. 

ORBBNTAL ESCORT SBtVtCE 
10MJ0N 

NEASE PHONE 071 225 3314 
•* am • escort • satvtcE • 
"•“tONOON"” 
PLEASE CAU ON 071 -^5- i202 



swnzBaANwor-woiujwoE 

tscorf Agsnev 

Q* f+41) [£7766 26 46 


Cat f+411 Q7766 26 46 

LOMTON-MCE ESCORT SBCV1CE 
•“•"FELICITY--*" 
*TEL:071-4B6- 4515* 


WgGvAp 77X2 
WoGrA 1759 +.17 
WbTotA p 1021 +4)1 
MuBdA 1064 —27 
MuHIA BSS — 23 
MUL1A 7.44 —21 
MuALAp 1071 —05 
MuARAp 971 —24 
MuCAAp £37—23 
MuFLAp 966 —07 
MUGAAP1079 —07 
MUMAAD1X74 —.06 
MuMDA 01023 —26 
MuMSA P 94)9 —.05 
MuNCAp 1150 —06 
MUNYAP1057— 06 
MUSCAP 1169 — JM 
MuTNAplOJl —04 
MuVAA p 1X98 —06 
yttlB 726 —23 
CapGBt 1X24 —22 
BOMB 1250— 4M 
EmGrSI 1966 +61 
GoWSt 670 —05 


-I EmeraeiixM 


Fxlncm 973 —24 
GtabolFx n 973 


\mssa 

Aaaryn M — 26 

Astoneqn24j4 +.14 

Ksl+ iS»^ 

gmMW 1964 +.12 
EmMKDbfn9.ia +28 


EaGrn 1255 +416 
Fxdlnc 9.93 —22 


StratGrA 1 
ST Govt 5 
USGvIA 
VRGA 
PBHG Fundi 
PilBaxEG l 

Growthn 1 
Infln T 
PFAMG) Ff£s 
Baton 1 
CopApn 1 
DivLown 1 
EmergMkt 
EnhEan 1 
Ealnc n l 
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AtadBcfln 1 
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Asset An 10£5 ... 

Fxdln 11 973 — 22 

Growthn 1X05 +.16 
Inttn 1X93 —04 
ST Gov n 975 
Value n 11.98 +23 
Pnco Funds: 

A4MJ5 460 —01 
Salmice 1179 +24 
BIChG 11-53 +4)5 


CoiTxn .925 —SB 
CrtJAprn 1355 —23 


rGran 11 £7 +23 
Incn 17.14 +26 
^ Wxn 1365 +4)9 
Europe n 1260 
repn . 1460 —27 


FLInsmtnlOJB —23 
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10-M +23 iRMCOFUOd 


tflYidn 1020 
IfltGCn 1X56—23 
ImtiEq l£74 —21 

szEsr*- 0 '. 


yahjeeani2J4 +.10 
sevain U28 +,ii 


ALLIANCE 


Escort Service 8> Travel. MuMnauaL 
Geneve 022 / 311 07 ST 


Gude Agency Td Tokyo 03 35 88 15 90 AMSTERDAM* DREAMS -ESCORT HAWWB KfltM nOSSFUtflRr 

ci areas. Bant Service. 

+31 BP&64 02 111 or640266& 00473294 

MIA ESCORT SBtVtCE * Ail ITALY ctwhmiu 'GfMFVA * * PARIS* 

/MAN 865439 06 0330 234392 totSer weT^ 



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IntmBt . 84 ) 6—21 
MAfTB 1161 +21 


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9.13 —4)1 MunMIGB 1061 +.10 
X98 +21 MutIBntt J 1861 +24 
aj)6 —21 MotuolSaifeK 
161 +21 Beacon n 3360 +27 
870 +.14 DtSCZMY 1X99 +.02 
0J7 +.16 quattdn 29.16 +4M 
427 +52 Shbresn 8X54 +53 


TrtRetn JJl —03 
THIII 887 —.09 
LowOurn 967 —01 
LDII 971 — JM 
ShortTfl 968—02 
Frqnn 96i —as 
Gtobrfn 973 —01 
HiYM 14153 +22 
Gfwthn 1450 +.13 


GNMn 921 —23 
GATFn 9.72—03 
i^toGv 966 +21 
Growthn 1153 +4)9 
Gwthlnn 1676 +.10 
HiYldn BJ1 +« 
Incomen BJ3 —23 
IntBdn 976 
Initpisn 1828 +2 
imSk n 1185 —sn 
Jocmnf 1158 —15 
LaWmn 1X77 +25 
MdShl n 5414 _ 

McmcFrn967 — jm 
M idCcfl>nl£46 +.15 
NewAmn2753 +.14 
N Aston 1069 +28 
NewEran2Ul + 


KYMun n 9.75 —23 
_S1 Govtn 951 —21 
Trtmsamerfca: 
AdSGvA 976 —21 


EmGthn 2X00 +.19 

Flxdlncn 9.72 +21 


CopGrp 11.90 +.17 
CATFB 967—07 


EmGAp 2452 +50 
EmGBt 25 t| +69 
GrlnAP 1153 +.08 
GrlnBl 1155 +28 
NatRSt 1£B7 +.14 
Qvlnct 09 —23 
CATF A P 967 —27 
GvlncTr 765 —02 




754 -22 
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11.96 —22 
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9.12 —06 WoitrPVat tl 977 +21 
8J5— 62 wwtzvaln lill +.01 


TFBdBt 960 -27 
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GSP 977 
MSP 968 
TMP1996 951 —01 
TFebW 957 — 01 , 
TMavV7 925 —21 : 
TumerGEnlX4l +.12 ' 
TwwdyGV 1X52 —10 ; 
Tweedy Vrt W65 +21 


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AZTF 

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19.79 +21 
R 90 +21 


1063 —01 
1 X 21 —03 
922 —40 


ModVol 1351 +2* 
OR.TE 15.97 — JB 


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Baflnvn U 


Brflnvn 1£« +.U 
GHtn 1X57 +70 
Growthn 2269 +54 
Httlnvn 1054 —.01 
lnnErnGrn£75 —04 


Batlnvl n 1X18 +61 
BasVHn 2152 +21 
Efllnln, 1X71 +26 
GNMA In 1113— 03 


IntSdtn 9.97 -21 
MjDCOi n 17.14 +57 
STGovtt 1555 - 

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GSmAR pl£l7 —03 
Mf*»H p 17.14 +J7 


mttEq n 7.90 —23 ... 

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SQertn 3327 +57 Wesfwooc 
TxESTn 927 — .01 Balinsi 
TStEIntn 1X15 — 04 Eqlte 

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CAPITAL MARKETS 

A Loss for U.K. Insurers: 
Right to Own Eurobonds 


Hie wording of new 

than 10 percent of qualifying as- British roles 

The definition of listed securi- dlBCOUrafieS tile 
ties — listed on a regulated stock _ ... 
exchange and traded on a regu- .holding OI Corporate 
lated market — does not encom- . 
pass Eurobonds. Although the l8SYie8 * 

Eurobonds are listed, mostly on 

the Luxembourg exchange, the international capital mar ket is not a 
regulated exchange. Only corporate bonds are affected, however, 
because government and supranational bonds are considered eligi- 
ble assets for the insurers. 

“It’s ludicrous,** a British banker commented. “It means insur- 
ance companies can include all their holdings of Greek government 
bonds rated tripIe-B but might not be able to include their holdin g s 
of triple-A-rated Unilever paper.’* 

Under pressure from the international Securities Market Associ- 
ation, the international bond market’s self-regulatory body, and the 
International Primary Market Association, Britain's Department of 
Trade and Industry announced last week that it is empowered to 
grant temporary concessions “in justified cases” and that it was 
wining to discuss the possibility of such a concession with any 
company significantly affected by the restrictions. 

Industry officials, aiming to undo the damage and ascertain that 
legislation in the pipeline in the other 1 1 countries of the European 
Union does not repeat the disabling wording, said they “will 
continue to discuss this situation with a view to reaching a more 
permanent solution.” 

While British officials said it was not clear whether the rules 
currently create a problem for any insurance company. John 
Langton, secretary general of International Securities Market Asso- 
ciation, said the organization’s goal is to have the wording changed 
because as it stands it means ’insurance companies would need 
more capital to hold ISMA product*’ 

Simon EQen, chafrmgn of the group’s committee of reporting 
dealers, estimated at least half of the British life insurance compa- 
nies’ holdings of sterling-denominated paper, which he estimated at 
£25 billion ($40 billion), is likely to be inadmiss ible. 

Although conditions in all bond markets were turbulent Friday. 
Mr. EBen said the sterling sector was especially hurt as news of the 
dispute provoked some panic s ellin g 



THE TRIB INDEX 


International Herald Tribune 120 
World Stock Index, composed 
of 280 intemabonalty investable H9 
stocks from 25 countries. 
compiled by Bloomberg ne 
Business News. 

Week ending September 16, 
daily closings. 

Jan. 1992 = 100. 116 

_ Ajjj/Pjgfflg nm 1on 


World Index 


Eiarope 


yrT'- 


North America I 


ii7 - 

lie HL ■■■ ' ■ v VhAVo ; 

F M T W T F 

... Latin America 


3*3 rss yr- 

.w™ 

sSs 


International Herald Tribune, Monday, September 19, 1994 


Page II 


ByCari Gewirtz 

International Herald Tribute 

P ARIS — Nobody, apart from some narrowly focused 
lawyers, was paying attention. In the space of a sentence, as 
they set about writing the British legislation to implement 
the European Commission’s directive on regulating the 
insurance industry, this major cia« of institutional inves- 
tors virtually lost its ability to own corporate Eurobonds. 

Promulgated last December, revised in early sp ring and enacted in 
July, the leg islati on defines which assets owned by British insurers 

can count in meeting solvency ■ — 

requirements. Unlisted securi- T . Tn .„J* „ . 

ties cannot account for more w Ordmg of new 


U.S. Says Menu Wm Prix Fixe I filiation Forces 

GE-De Beers Antitrust Case Centers on Brussels Meal China to Raise 

By Douglas Frantz rough, gravelly stones that are now mainly And if Mr. Uoiier is not an agent of De "TV # 7* • "| *■ 

Nr* York Tima Service synthetic and used in everything from oil- Beers, there is no crime here.” B ■ lOlrlfi 

NEW YORK —It started with a din- wc ^ drilling to precision cutting. De Beers also has denied wrongdoing. w JL Jl\JAvJLo 

ner between two diamond-industry exec- A federal grand jury indictment allies fo will not contest the charges in a U.S. JL 


By Douglas Frantz 

Nr* York Times Service 

NEW YORK — It started with a din- 
ner between two diamond-industry exec- 
utives in Brussels two years ago. Next 
month in a courtroom in Columbus, 
Ohio, the federal government will argue 
that what transpired was a crucial act in 
an international conspiracy in violation 
of U.S. antitrust law. 

Peter Frenz, industrial diamond sales 
manager for Europe for General Electric 
Co., sat down with PhiHipe Liotier at the 
Royal Windsor HoieL 

Mr. Liotier worked for Diamant 
Bo art, a Belgian company that regularly 
bought industrial diamonds from GE 
What the Justice Department's investi- 
gators found intriguing was who owned 
Diamant Boart and what transpired at 
the dinner and afterwards. 

Diamant Boart is owned in part by De 
Beers Consolidated Mines LuL, the South 
African conglomerate lcaown best for 
dominating the market for gem diamonds 
found in rings, necklaces and other jewel- 
ry. But De Beers is also GE’s major com- 
petitor in industrial diamonds — the 


rough, gravelly stones that are now mainly 
synthetic and used in everything from oil- 
well drilling to precision cutting. 

A federal grand jury indictment alleges 
that during the meal Mr. Liotier provided 
Mr. Frenz with a list of upcoming De 
Beers price increases for industrial dia- 
monds. The GE sales manager quickly 
relayed them to his superiors in the Unit- 
ed States, according to the indictment. 

After receiving the information. GE 
allegedly raised its diamond prices in 
concert with De Beers. Since the compa- 
nies dominate the business, the prices for 
industrial diamonds went up worldwide. 

The government claims that Mr. Lio- 
tier was exchanging information on be- 
half of De Beers, with Diamond Boart as 
a subterfuge. GE argues that Mr. Uoiier 
was operating solely as an executive of 
Diamond Boart and there was no agree- 
ment with De Beers to fix prices!* 

“All the contacts we had with Liotier 
were contacts with him as our customer. 
Diamond Boart,” said Dan K. Webb, a 
former U.S. attorney in Chicago, who 
represents GE. “We never believed that 
Diamond Boart was acting for De Beers. 


And if Mr. Uoiier is not an agent of De 
Beers, there is no crime here.” 

De Beers also has denied wrongdoing. 
It will not contest the charges in a U.5. 
court On previous occasions, it has 
proven to be outside U.S. jurisdiction. 
“We are not involved in the main stream 
of American business in any sense at all. 
so we won't be appearing in court in 
Ohio,” said Brian Cullmgworth, an exec- 
utive with De Beers in Johannesburg. 

To the Justice Department the Brus- 
sels episode is crucial. 

Anne K. Bingamnn heads the Justice 
Department's antitrust division. Her high- 
profile pursuit of Microsoft Corp. ended 
recently with a settlement that seemed a 
draw at best The software giant agreed to 
change some practices the government 
claimed were unfair, but analysts said the 
settlement really would not dent Micro- 
soft's dominance of the market for per- 
sonal-computer operating software. 

Jack F. Welch Jr., the chair man of GE 
is one of the most respected managers in 
America. Recently, however, he has been 

See DIAMONDS, Page 13 


World Bank India limits Phone Opening 

Sees Crisis in Foreigners Forbidden to Control Basic-Services Providers 

_ y'V if Ccmpltd by 0«r Staff Frm DopoKha the exclusive domain of the De- operations, said: “In raos 

lAtV LrTOWttl NEW DELHI - India has partmwU of Telecommunicati- countries, when basic service 
J ended months of suspense by Under the rules, only one are opened up. the long-d.s 


Realm 

WASHINGTON — With 
the number of people living in 
cities about to equal rural popu- 
lation for the first time, the 
World Bank said Sunday that 
nations must focus efforts on 
urban pollution and poverty. 

“We advocate a people- 
centred environmentalism, 
which must focus on dries, be- 
cause that is where the majority 
of humanity is going to be liv- 
ing.” the World Bank president, 
Lewis Preston, said on the eve 
of a conference here on the in- 
creasingly filthy air and water 
in the world’s burgeoning cities. 

“Protecting the rain forest 
and protecting biodiversity is 
important because it will pre- 
serve natural resources for the 
next generation, but cleaning 
up dries will help hundreds of 
'millions of people right now.” 
Mr. Preston said. 

Michael Cohen, a Bank advis- 
er, said it was increasingly clear 
that tackling so-called green is- 
sues and ignoring urban degra- 
dation is not effective. 

The Bank is sponsoring the 
conference this week on sus- 
tainable urban development. 

Urban population in develop- 
ing countries is growing at a 3.8 
percent annual rate and will in- 
crease to 3.6 billion in 2020 from 
1.4 billion people in 1990. 

Mr. Cohen alluded to the pop- 
ulation of Goma. Zaire, which 
exploded with a million refugees. 
Thousands died from lack of 
sanitation and clean water. 

Twenty-five percent of the 
world’s urban population lives in 
absolute poverty, the Bank said. 


NEW DELHI — India has 
ended months of suspense by 
spelling out rules to govern com- 
petition in its telecommunica- 
tions market after opening basic 
telephone services to overseas 
and local companies. Some com- 
panies said the guidelines still 
limited their participation. 

Telecommunications Minister 
Sukh Ram said Saturday that 
only local domestic companies 
would be penmtted to provide 
basic telephone services, but that 
foreign concerns could hold up 
to 49 percent in joint ventures. 

Some foreign and local busi- 
nesses said the rules deny a ma- 
jority stake in the private tele- 
communications sector to over- 
seas companies. The policy also 
keeps long-distance calls within 


the exclusive domain of the De- 
partment of Telecommunicati- 
ons. Under the rules, only one 
private telephone network 
would be allowed to compete 
with the government in any city. 

AT&T Corp., Motorola Inc., 
U S West Inc., France Telecom 
and Telestra Corp. of Australia 
are among the foreigners inter- 
ested in India's market. 

Sanjay Kumar of France Te- 
lecom said: “We welcome the 
decision to allow private partic- 
ipation. We hope to be a pan of 
the telecommunications revolu- 
tion that will hit India.” 

But Amit Sharma of Motor- 
ola said the policy guidelines 
were “clearly disappointing.” 

Mr. Sharma, chief of Motor- 
ola's central and south Asian 


operations, said: “In most 
countries, when basic services 
are opened up. die long-dis- 
tance and international lines 
are the first to be opened.” 

Among other rules, licenses 
for private operators will be 
granted for 15 years and can be 
extended by 10 years. 

A Telecommunications Reg- 
ulatory Authority of India will 
enforce pricing, revenue-shar- 
ing and other areas to protect 
consumers’ interests. 

Motorola has already said it 
would enter India’s cellular 
phone and paging markets and 
has involved the country in its 
$3.4 billion Iridium project for 
a global mobile phone system, 
which isexpccled to become op- 
erational in 199S. 

(Reuters. AFP) 


Afpsct Frsncc J'n-ise 

BEIJING — China’s failure 
to curb inflation has forced the 
central bank to announce a 5.62 
percent increase in interest rates 
payable on long-term yuan de- 
posits that come due in October, 
a report said Sundav. 

The People’s Bank of China 
said it would pay the increased 
rate on savings with terms of 
three, five or eight years due next 
month, boosting by 5.62 percent 
the original Interest ruLes of 
13.14 percent, 14.94 percent and 
17.64 percent, respectively. 

“The high-m teres: yields on 
bank deposits arc expected to 
earn the confidence of Chinese 
who have been worrying that 
their deposited money is losing 
value due to the high inflation 
rate,” the report said. 

Even with the increase, how- 
ever, the interest rates remain 
well below inflation, which hit 
27.1 percent in China's biggest 
cities in August, compared with 
the similar period last year. 

The China Daily said China 
has revised its 1994 inflation 
target upward to 15 percent. 

The new target, up from the 
10 percent set early this year, 
still appeared unrealistic after 
the jump in prices in China's 
major cities. The inflation level 
was up from 24.2 percent in 
July, malting it the highest since 
1988. when discontent about 
rampant inflation was one of 
the factors behind the following 
year’s pro-democracy demon- 
strations that were violently 
suppressed by Chinese troops. 

Li Jiange, an official of the 
State Securities Regulatory 
Commission, blamed inflation- 
ary pressure in pan on spiral- 
ling food prices caused by the 
agricultural sectors weak per- 
formance this year as well as 
rising production costs. 

While inflation has consis- 
tently defied government efforts, 
deposi tors neven heicss feared 
that rates on savings would fall. 


The increase in October's rate 
announced Sunday, which also 
applies to Treasury bonds ma- 
turing in October, is designed to 
ease depositor fears that rates 
would be cut in coming months 
and insiead keep depositors 
from withdrawing their money 
and resorting to panic buying 
that would further fuel inflation. 

Observers brought about 
concern in August bv predict- 
ing that interest rates would fall 
as the government’s credit- 
tightening policy began to curb 
soaring prices. 

In an apparent acknowledge- 
ment that inflation was not ex- 
pected to come down soon, the 
report said that although the so- 
called subsidiary rate was un- 
likely to rise above 5.62. it would 
probably not fall in the near 
term and would not go below 2 
percent before the end of June. 

At the end of July, individual 
bank savings hit 1.83 trillion 
yuan ($212.7 billion), up 352.9 
billion yuan this year. 

■ Billions for Oil 

China needs to spend nearly 
$12 billion to upgrade its oil 
industry and is looking abroad 
for funds, the Associated Press 
reported from Beijing. 

Li Yizhong. executive vice 
president of the China Petro- 
chemical Corp., was quoted by 
the official China Daily Busi- 
ness Weekly as saying a large 
amount of foreign capital 
would be needed to renovate 
and expand oil production fa- 
cilities. He did not specify how 
much foreign capital China 
planned to tty to attract. 

Priority will be given to reno- 
vating refineries in coastal re- 
gions, where imported crude oil 
can be processed close to the 
highly industrialized areas 
where it is used. China has 20 
percent of the world’s popula- 
tion but less than 4 percent of 
its total capacity for processing 
crude oil. Mr. Li said. 


EU Finance Ministers to Publicly Confess Failures 


Reuters 

BRUSSELS — In 3 rare case of public 
self-humiliation, European Union fi- 
nance ministers are expected to admit 
on Monday that virtually all of them 
have been guilty of negligence in manag- 
ing their national finances. 

Hie ministers are expected to agree 
with the European Commission that ail 
except Luxembourg and Ireland breach 
the Maastricht treaty's rules on the level 
of national deficits and debts, two key 
criteria for the creation of a united cur- 
rency. Even more unusual, they will then 
ask the commission to teD them what to 
do to make amends. 

“The commission has recommended 
putting 10 countries on the deficit black- 
list,” one diplomat said. “On Monday 
we will accept this without discussions.” 


It is unclear just how detailed the 
recommendations will be. but the com- 
missioner for economic affairs. Henning 
Christophersen. has hinted they will fo- 
cus on telling member states to slick to 
their convergence plans that are de- 
signed to get member economies ready 
for the single currency. 

The recommendations will be dis- 
cussed early next month. 

Mr. Christophersen has said he would 
like the reports to be published once 
they have been agreed upon by the min- 
isters. Diplomats said that on balance it 
appears the ministers would agree. 

The meeting Monday will also review 
progress so far in implementing the rec- 
ommendations contained in the white 
paper on jobs and growth that was agreed 


upon in principle at the EU's summit 
meeting in December. 

Apart from wage restraints, increased 
labor flexibility, more training and curb- 
ing the cost of social protection, the 
document proposed a major program of 
public works. 

The commission has drawn up a list of 
1 1 priority projects approved in princi- 
ple by last June's EU summit meetings. 

It is now carrying out cost analyses. 
Decisions are due in December. 

The main issue for these so-called 
trans- European networks is how to 
bridge any funding gaps that occur. 

The commission has proposed raising 
at least some of the money itself through 
bonds, but finance ministers are ada- 
mantly opposed to that because it would 


send conflicting signals to money mar- 
kets when everyone is trying to reduce 
their debt. 

The finance ministers are also due to 
discuss economic convergence plans 
submitted by Ireland and Greece. 

Mr. Christophersen has said the Irish 
plan presents no difficulties. Greece, 
however, continues to have some major 
problems with debt and inflation. 

Diplomats said they expected the 
Greek plan to be approved with some 
fairly tough comments. 

Monday's meeting will once more try 
to persuade Italy to drop its veto on 
increased national contributions to the 
EU's budget, which was agreed upon in 
principle at the summit meeting in Edin- 
burgh in December 1992. 


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Utilities 130 . 49130.18 -4124 Raw Materials 136 . 40 137.75 - 0.98 

Finance 115.43 115.07 +Q^T Consumer Goods 103 . 49 104,33 - 0.61 

Services 122.18 121.97 + 0.17 Miscellaneous 136 ^ 5136^7 - 0.45 

The index Iroda U.S. do&r values of socks in: Tokyo. Mew York. London, and 

SSSlSflS?. s£a«p£«. Sp£v Sweden, Venezuela For 

Tokyo, Now Yetit and London the lodge fc composed of 20 op issues In terms 
of mark* «v*afeatfw». otfwnirise Ste 6*n tap stocks are trucked. 

' O International Herald Triune 

CURRENCY RATES 


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Indian rupee JUS 
lnde.r «M 217M4 
IridlE ttwn 

Krocamek. UB2 
Kuwaiti dinar Mom 
Mam. nan. Z5»7 


Currency Perl 
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Port escudo 157,41 
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Sontirtyri 375 
5IM.I 1-M 


Currency ■ Per* 
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S-Kor.VWM 79930 
SwwL kroon 748 
Taiwan t 2U2 

TtuiDobt 2595 

Turkish lira 33889. 
UAEdrbam 147Z7 
Veoez. botfv. (9580 


Forward R«te* __ 

— fMoy war Currency XWJny uoav May 

15638 CanaABlOBHar T3«M laan 

JEETS liS Jopanese ren 99« «U9 

, U M . . -/JVC Bern /Amsterd am ): mdosuat Bank <Bntst*s)i Banco Commercial It otfana 

f Toronto): fMF(SOR)- Otoerdato from Reuters and AP. 


Japan’s Newest Automaker 


By Steven Brail 

International Herald Tribune 

FUCHU, Japan — One might expect the 
factory of Japan’s newest automaker to be 
filled with squadrons of robots and uniformed 
workers, such as those assembling cars at 
Toyota Motor Corp. and Nissan Motor Co. 

Instead, small teams of workers in what is 
little more than a big metal garage use rubber 
hammers, welding torches and wrenches to 

build cars the old-fash- 

ioned way: one at a time. 

Moreover, the car they 
are making, the Zero-1, is 
a bit of a throwback. It is 
an imitation of ibe Lours 
7, a 1950s British two-seat 
racing car with bug-eyed 
headlights and an open 
top. 

Unlike the rest of Japan’s auto industry, 
which is saddled with overcapacity, there are 
already orders for 300 of the 2.95 milli on yen 
($29,800) vehicles, enough to keep the 10- 
person operation running at full speed 
through the end of next year. 

When Susumu Mitsuoka started his com- 
pany. Mitsuoka Motors, in 1968, it was noth- 
ing more than a paint shop and used car lot. 
Since then, it has used franchisees to expand 
to 24 outlets, including one in Los Angeles, 
which sell 9,000 cars yearly. 

Profits from the enterprise have allowed 
Mr. Mitsuoka, 55, to keep his eye on a long- 
term goal — to become an automaker. He 
realizes there is little chance of competing 
with the titans anytime soon, but there was no 
choice but to start s mall . 

“This is the rite of passage to becoming an 
automaker," he saitl'To get going, you have 
to be making something. Eventually, I hope 
to make my own designs." 

The first step, taken about a decade ago, was 
to join the scores of companies around the 
world making replicars, imitations of classics. 

Outside the garage is a collection of a new 
Marches, a compact car made by Nissan. 
Brought inside, workers strip off most of the 
exterior body panels and replace them with 
panels supplied by Honda. 


After repainting, the result is a vehicle 
whose exterior resembles a 1957 Jaguar 
(which, Mr. Mitsuoka said, was the inspira- 
tion for Nissan's design!. 

About 30 workers produce 960 units a year. 
Each sells for 1.69 million yen, almost double 
the cost of the Nissan March. 

Jt is the Zero-i, though, that made the 
company in northwestern Japan the country’s 
1 0th official automaker, and the first since 
Honda was licensed in the 1960s. (The Japa- 
nese government does not consider replicar 
makers as automakers.) 

The Zero-1 is built from the ground up. Mr. 
Mitsuoka explained, pointing to a pile of 
narrow pipes that would be welded into the 
chassis. “I went to the Ministry of Transport 
to ask for authorization, but they refused on 
the grounds that 1 wasn't already an auto- 
maker," be said. 

The problem was that Mitsuoka Motors 
was not a member of the Japan Automobiles 
Manufacturers Association. The cost of join- 
ing was beyond his means. “I went back to the 
ministry and asked whether joining JAMA 
was a legal requirement. U wasn't. So I asked 
them to consider whether they’ wanted to 
force me to fire all my employees." 

The ministry relented and crowned Mr. 
Mitsuoka an “assembler” of automobiles. Bui 
they gave him permission to make only 99 
units a year, an example of extralegal admin- 
istrative guidance routinely offered but offi- 
cially denied by bureaucrats. 

With limited sales and S2 million in develop- 
ment costs to cover, the Zero- 1 will never make 
money. But Mr. Mitsuoka is undeterred. "If 1 
were to think about the economics of this. I’d 
never make it," he said.“I do it because it’s fun. 
The more difficult the better.” 

Mr. Mitsuoka s next goal is to develop his 
own sporty, open car. “1 think there’s room for 
another carmaker in Japan." he said. “There’s 
lots of people for whom paying a few million 
yen is just like buying a shirt and a tie.” 

Articles in this series appear every other 
Monday. 





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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 1994 


Page 12 


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Erstwhile Secret Posted on Internet 


By John Markoff 

.Yew York Times Scmcc 

SAN FRANCISCO — In an 
act of business espionage, 
someone has anonymously cir- 
culated the underlying software 
formula of one of the most pop- 
ular coding systems used for 
protecting information sent 
over computer networks. 

The formula, which has been 
a trade secret, belongs to RSA 
Data Security Inc. a small, pri- 
vately held, software company 
in Redwood City, California. 
RSA sells encryption software 
to the nation's largest computer 
and software companies, in- 
cluding Apple Computer Inc„ 
International Business Ma- 


chines Corp^ Lotus Develop- 
ment Corp„ Microsoft Corp. 
and Sun Microsystems Inc. 

In recent days, one or more 
people have anonymously post- 
ed the formula on electronic 
bulletin boards on computer 
networks around the world. 

Executives from RSA said: 
“RSA considers this misappro- 
priation to be most serious. Not 
only is this act a violation of the 
law, but its publication is a 
gross abuse of the Internet." 
Internet is the global web of 
computer networks on which 
the formula has been circulated. 

Although disclosure of the 
formula (kies not necessarily al- 
low eavesdroppers to intercept 


and unscramble coded mes- 
sages sent with the RSA encryp- 
tion software, widespread dis- 
semination could compromise 
the long-term effectiveness of 
the system, analysts said. 

The disclosure also throws 
into question a two-year-old 
agreement in which the govern- 
ment has allowed computer and 
software companies to export 
products incorporating the 
RSA system. 

The financial impact that dis- 
closure of the formula will have 
on RSA. the leading maker of 
encryption software, is unclear. 
RSA has revenue estimated at 
S 5 million to S10 million a year. 

The formula, which is known 


The Week Ahead; World Economic Calendar, Sept. 1 9 - Sept. 24 


A schedule of this week's economic and 
nnantxal events, compiled for the interna- 
tional Herald Tribune by Bloomberg Busi- 
ness News. 


Asia-Pacific 

• Seqrt.19 Canberra Australian hous- 
ing tinanca figures tor July. Forecast run. 
Now DtU Delegation from 25 loading 
U.S contparaas arrives on a weoh-tong 
visit aimed at clearing bureaucratic hur- 
dles to U.S. investment in India. 

Jakarta Medco Energy Corp- to sell 22 
million shares of 4 .350 rupiah each tor a 
-Jakarta lotmg. 

Tokyo August abKtrtdly usage. 

Kuala Lumpur First day ot a two-day 
conference on securitization, sponsored 
by Rating Agency Malaysia Bhd. al the 
HHion hotel. 

Singapore Tenth Asla-PaoHc Petro- 
leum Conference at me Raffles City Con- 
vention Center. Through Sept. 21 . 

• Sept. 20 Tokyo Economic Planning 
Agency releases July household spend- 
ing survey. 

Kota Ktaabatu, Malaysia MGR Corp 
stockholders' meeting to discuss pro- 
posed acquisition ot Parakaya Plywood. 
Wellington NewZeaJand foreign debt as 
ot June 30. Forecast Widen. 

• SepL 21 Canberra New car regis- 
trations tor August. Forecast: Un- 
changed. 

Jakarta Langgeng Matcmur. a plastics 
cammpany seas 1 8 milfion shares of 3.000 
rupiah each lor a Jakarta Bsong. and the 
agriculture company Prasldha Aneka 
Nlaga otters 30 million shares of 3.000 
rupiah each. 

Tokyo Japanese securities houses to 
report revised earnings forecasts tor the 
six months ending this month. 

Tokyo Chairman ot Federation of Japan 
Bankers' Association Tohio Morikawa, 
holds a press conference. 

Singapore East-West Conference for 
Managed Futures and Deriva t ives. Toyoo 
Gyoten. chairman of the Bank of Tokyo, 
gores keynote address. Through Sept. 23. 

• Sept. 22 Canberra Australian Busi- 
ness Economists torum. Topic Perspec- 
tives on the economy, markets and invest- 
ment 

Sydney Westpac-Meibotime Institute 
consumer confidence survey lor Septem- 
ber. 


Hong Kong August consumer price in- 
dex figures. 

Tokyo Bank at Japan releases survey 
on Japan’s personal savings tor the Aprtt- 
June period. 

Singapore sixth international Petro- 
chemical Conference at the Rattles City 
Convention Center. Throutfi Sept 23. 
e Sept. 23 Sydney Australian retail 
sales tor July. Forecast: rise. 

Jakarta Conference on "The New Indo- 
nesian investment Policy - at the Sshtd 
Jaye Hotel. 

• Sept 24 Bangkok Trade and eco- 
nomic ministers tram Japan and the « 
members of the Association ol Southeast 
Aslan Nations meet for discussion on 
trade and Industrial cooperation In the 
region. 

Europsi 

• Expectant (Ms weak Madrid Au- 
gust producer price index. 

Amsterdam August unemployment. 
Forecast: 7 4 percent 

Frankfurt July trade balance. Forecast: 
<L5 bUDon Deutsche mark surplus. Also, 
Jury current account Forecast: 3.7 billion 
DM deficit 

F ra nkf o rt August producer price Index. 
Forecast Up 0.5 percent In year. 
FraMdurt August M-3 money suppty- 
Forecest Up 8.8 percent In year. 

Rone July industrial production. Fore- 
cast Up 5.0 percent in year. 

Room July producer price Index, fore- 
cast Up 02 percent in year. Abo, August 
hourly wages. Forecast Up 2J percent 
Room August M-2 money supply on a 
three-month average and August total 
bank lending. 

Rome August foreign-exchange re- 
serves and trade balance. 

Brussels September consumer price In- 
dex. 

• Sept* IB Amsterdam July producer 
price stdax. 

Bmssele EU finance mbsstars to dis- 
cuss deficit procedures. 

Copenhagen August consumer price 
index. Forecast Up 02 percent m month, 
up 2.1 percent in year. 

Earnings e xp e cte d Fechiney SA and 
Pechiney International. 

• Sept, 20 Am ste r da m Dutch queen 
delivers speech and Prime Minister Kok 
presents 1995 government budget to par- 
liament 


London August M-4 money Supply- 
Forecast: Up 0.4 percent in month, up 4.8 
percent In year. 

Madrid Group of 7 deputies meet to set 
agenda lor the October 0-7 meeting. 
Stockholm August trade balance. Fore- 
cast Z3 Pin ton-krona surplus. 

Earnings e x pectod Bertefemann. Canal 
Plus. 

• l ut . 21 London August trade bat- 
anoa ex-EU. Forecast E500 mtibon deficit. 
Paris Cabinet meeting to present 1995 
dran budget. 

Pmfs August consumer price index. 
Rome September consumer price in- 
dex. Forecast Up 0J2 percent In month, 
up 3Ji per ce nt m year. 

Earnings expected British Aerospace, 
e Sept. 22 London CBI manufactur- 
ing trends survey. 

Parts August household consumption. 
Forecast Up 0.3 percent 
Paris August housing starts. 

Earnings expected Cockertfi Sombre, 
Credit Commercial da Franca, Credit Ly- 
onnais, Guinness. 

• Sept. 23 London Second-quarter 
grou domestic product Forecast Up 1 .0 
percent In quarter, up 3.7 percent In the 
year. 

London Seconckjuartar balance ot pay- 
ments. Forecast £1.3 minion (fetich. 
London Second-quarter real personal 
disposable Income. 

Parts July trade balance. Forecast &S 
bHon-tranc surplus. 

Amarleas 

■ Sept. 18 Phoe ni x Americ a n Mining 
Congress holds its annual convention, 
which Focuses on mining opportunities m 
the Untied Stans. Through Sept 21. 
Washington World Bank releases Its an- 
nual report 



a Sept, in Newar k . New Jersey U.S. 

Bankruptcy Court n expected to select 


the winning bidder lor tiw assets ot West- 
ern Union Financial Services toe . whose 
parent company New Valley Corp.. de- 
ctaied bankruptcy in March 1993. 

New York Motorola toe. and Qnkyo USA 
announce jobk venture on consumer au- 
dlo/Ykteo products. 

Minimum Hi General Mills me., the No. 
2 U.S. cereal maker, annual meeting and 
SraHtuarter results. 

MtaoMpefla Date Boswortn. a unit or 
Inter-Regtanal Financial Group, hosts its 
mnih annual heaHhcare conference today 
through Sept. 21. About 52 pubhcly trad- 
ed companies expected to attend. 

New York American Banker begins a 
two day conference on commercial bank 
acquisitions of mortgage compamee 
e Sept. SO Washington The Com- 
mon*! Department reports July merchan- 
f tine trade. 

Sao Paulo Treffing tour-week inflation 
rate. Outlook: Down from 1.38 percent 
Ottawa July international and retail 
trade. 

C ha rt ot tesvJBe. Virginia. Ford Motor 
Co.’s Jaguar division Introduce* a new 
XJ6, its first significantly redesigned se- 
dan In almost 10 years. 

New York Department ot Trade end In- 
dustry and the South African Foreign 
Trade Organization present "South Africa 
and the USA; Strengthening the Link' 
trade exhibition. Through Sept- 23. .’■Wi 
exhibits from mare than 120 South Afri- 
can businesses. 

• Sept. 21 Washington Augusthoue- 
Ing starts and butting permits. 

■ sept. 22 Washington August Trea- 
sury statement 

Seattle Personal Communications In- 
dustry Association holds annual confer- 
ence and showcase. Through Sept 24. 
Washington The Federal Communica- 
tions Commlsston sponsors e tutorial on 
“A Generic IMraiasa Interlace to the Na- 
tional information Infrastructure." 
Earntega expected H.B. Fuller. 

• Sept. 22 S antia go August trad# fig- 
ures and monthly indicator ol economic 
activity lor July- Outlook: Growth slows to 
2 percent 

We al J ugUm The Federal Reserve Board 

reports August bank credit. 

Geor g etown. D ataware Chancery Court 
hearing on American General Corp.'s mo- 
tion seeking to force takeover target Urn- 
mn Inc. to drop its defenses to American 
General's S2.6 bAon hostile bid. 


FIDELITY FUNDS 

Societe d'lnvcstisscmcnt a Capital Variable 
KansallLs' House, Place de I'Etoile • - - 
B.P.2I74 L- 1021 Luxembourg 
RCS Luxembourg B 34036 

NOTICE OF ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING 

Notice is hereby smen (hat (he Animal General Meciifit! ol’ Shareholders ol' Fidelity Funds 
(“the Fund”) wilfhe held at the registered oil ice of the Fund in Luxembourg on 6lh October 
1W4 at noun to consider the following agenda: 

1 . Presentation of (he Report of the Board of Directors: 

2. Presentation of the Report of the Auditors: 

3. Approval of the balance sheet and income statement for the financial vear ended 30th April 
1994: 

4. Discharge to the Board of Directors: 

5. Election of nine (9) Directors, specifically the re-election of (he following nine (9) present 
Directors: Messrs. Edward C. Johnson 3rd. Yasukazu Akamalsu. Barry R. J. Bateman. 
Charles T. M. Coliis. Sir Charles A. Fraser. Jean Hamiiius. Glen R. Moreno, David J. Saul 
and Helmert Frans van den Hoven : 

6. Approval of the payment of Directors' fees for the year ended 30th April 1994; 

7. Election of the Auditors, specifically the election of Coopers & Lybrand S.C., Luxembourg; 
S. Approval of ihe payment of dividends for ihe year ended 30ih April 1994 and authorisation 

of the Board of Directors to declare further dividends in respect of the financial year ended 
30th April 1 994 if necessary to enable the Fund to qualify for 'distributor status' under 
United Kingdom and Irish tax laws: 

9. Consideration of such other business as may properly come before the meeting. 

Subject to the limitations imposed by the Articles of Incorporation of the Fund with regard to 
ownership of shares by US persons or of shares which constitute in rhe aggregate more than 
three per cent 1 3^r ) of the outstanding shares, each share is entitled to one vote. A shareholder 
may attend and vote at the meeting or may appoint a proxy to attend and vote. Such proxy need 
not be a shareholder of the Fund. 

Holders of Registered Shares may vote by proxy by reruraing to the regi' ered office of the 
Fund the form of registered shareholder proxy senr to them. 

Holders of Bearer Shares who wish to attend the Annual General Meeting or vote at the 
Meeting by proxy should contact the Fund, or one of the following institutions: 

in Luxembourg 

Fidelity Investments Luxembourg S.A. 

Kansallis House 
Place de I'Etoile, B.P. 2174 
L-1021 LUXEMBOURG 


Bankers Trust Luxembourg S.A. 
14, bd. F.D. Roosevelt 
L-2450 LUXEMBOURG 


in the United Kingdom 

Fidelity Investments International 

Oakhill House 

130 Tonbridge Road 

Hildenborough 

KENTTN 11 9DZ 

United Kingdom 

in Germany 

Bankhaus B. Metzler seel. 

Sohn & Co. KGaA 
GroBe Gallussirafie 12 
D-60329 Frankfim am Main 

in France 


in Ireland 

Bradwell Limited 
4) -45 St. Sephen's Green 
DUBLIN 2 
IRELAND 


in Switzerland 

Union Bancaire PrivSe Geneve 
96-9S. me du Rhone 
CH-12I1 GENEVE 1 


in The Netherlands 

Fidelity Investments International 
Concengebouwplein li 
NL-1071 LL Amsterdam 

in Aus fria 

Crcditansralt-Bunkvercin 
Schottengosse 6 
A-I010 Wien 


Banque Indosuez 
76. bd. Haussmann 
F-75008 PARIS 

in Hong Kong 

Fidelity Investments Management 
(Hong Kong) Limited 
16th Roor, Citibank Tower 
3 Garden Road, central Hong Kong 

To be valid, proxies must reach the registered office of the Fund on the 3rd October 1 994 at noon 
i Luxembourg time) at the latest. 

Dated: 15th July. 1994 

By Order of the Board of Directors 


Fidelity 



investments' 


Euromarts 
At a Glance 


7M 

741 

7JI 

421 

728 

7to 

M6 

5.43 

6.92 

678 

L9i 

(H 

9.15 

L97 

9.15 

624 

1.16 

US 

616 

s to 

llto 

11.11 

11 to 

7.*1 

■Jl 

641 

674 

628 

ML91 

11.22 

llto 

744 . 

648 

673 

U7 

618 

8.19 

S.U 

622 

581 

9J0 

696 

944 

Ml 

9S3 

92S 

9JS 

659 

US 

US 

9M 

599 * 

454 

4iS 

465 

U7 


Eurobond Yields 

SnrttoSef*.* YYBfen Yrlnr 

U5. L lane term 
113. S> mam term 
UJ. L start fern 
Funds ttrttne 
Frma francs 
Italian lira 
Dantehlnaa 
Swedhft krona 
ECU, lane fern 
ECU. (Mm term 

cut 

Aus.1 
HZ.S 
Yen 

Source: Lunenbauro Stock exxnmwt . 

Weekly Setae sqr. is 

cbm GmdMr 

I NM 1 Nat 

S™*? — MM 11 IS l«U« 

“terart. UD — KB.W £U0 

uiao 3440 wm into 
ECP 500.1* U71D0 MU4 MXMD 

TOM 5L3SUO Jtolto Mffto IMA 

StEBfldBOitarkrf 

cbm BwrodMr 

_ . .. * Nnaf S MM 

5*<*jM* MMB 14588.10 3158140 SStof » 

Crown. 0848 33UD 141 WO IJOA 

MJ1M l.WMO Ntolto 3.7340 
52, MWto KU5M0 U3UD ZUMto 

flABto HU33JB 33.595.10 SU3O0 
Source: EorocNor.Cedef. 

■Jbor Rates s*. w 

l-wofh xmnfe 4 -bmA 

«A 413/M ssnt 

“2*®*™* <15/14 » 

FtoMtetetos Jan* 511 m <an4 

«*OHra« S5/H 5Vj s 13/10 

5™ » s 13/14 43/14 

Yt " *7/14 TV. 2H 

*wrces; Ltovas Bank. Routers. 




RC 4 . has become the de fac- 
to coding standard for many 
popular software programs in- 
cluding Microsoft Windows. 
Apple's Macintosh operating 
system and Lotus Notes. 

It is the only software-based 
formula that the National Secu- 
rity Agency, the government s 
electronic spy agency, wnl per- 
mit to be exported under an 
agreement the agency reached 
two years ago. 

RSA Data Security execu- 
tives said Friday that it was 
possible that public disclosure 
of the formula could compro- 
mise the agreement between the 
National Security Agency and 
the software industry. 


* 


,t* 




Bread Cost 
Multiplies 
In Georgia 

CuRpiled far Our Staff From Despatches 

TBILISSL Georgia — Resi- 
dents woke up here on Saturday 
to find the price of subsidized 
food, transport and electricity 
in the Georgian Republic had 
risen by as much as 300 times. 

Hundreds of angry Georgians 
blocked roads in the capital Tbi- 
lisi on to protest against huge 
price rises for bread, announced 
by the government n line with 
International Monetary Fund 
demands for austerity. 

A spokesman for the cabinet 
confirmed that the price of sub- 
sidized bread rose from 600 cou- 
pons to 200,000 coupons over 
the weekend, while transport 
and energy prices were also 
raised. The coupon is Georgia’s 
interim currency. 

To compensate, the govern- 
ment raised the monthly mini- 
mum wage from 250,000 cou- 
pons to 2J mfflion, but the rise is 
largely academic. Georgians 
long ago ceased to consider the 
coupon, which trades at about 4 
million to a dollar, as real mon- 
ey. Nearly all transactions, in- 
cluding state pbone bills, are 
paid in Russian rubles. 

“The day has been very diffi- 
cult,’' said Dato Gabiichidze, a 
baker- (AFP. Reuters) 


UK:/;, 


£»Pl 




S23rt-;. 


•n : P* 




Page 13 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 1994 


New international Bond Issues 

Compiled by Paul Ftoren 


Ittuar 


Amount 

(miffions) 


Hat 


Coup. 

% 


Pries 


Price 

and 

week 


Term* 


Floating Rate Notes 





'«**■ 




Sv.- 




e*«rt i; 


U; 




V. 


■y» 

9: *• 


r*y 

>- 

1 f- 


S«U i Sb ■ ■ 

utWwa 

t.-*. - 

r i|_. 


■ s- 

hn t.L-i 




j:,T 


• fm :• 

rs 

r .. . 

S»*Sto 

T ,r : * 

VlHti-V-'X- 


r«;-e-. .j. 
*lM 72 Vo-- 
■ •«% - 
*■: . t . . 

.- ilft/ T • 

. * 

# 

Vmn-jei.a.- .\l-:„.ir 

'»T" 

S-v • i 




V* rW 


i< 


Brt 

■j If 

lit ireorgit 


Banco 

LatmoAmerkano de 
Exportations* 

$250 

1995 


99.90 

— 

Over 3-raomh Libor. rtencoKabte. Dnomincnion* $10jD0ft. 
Fee* 0.10%. [S«reo Bonk CcxpJ 

Bank of Melbourne 

$300 

1997 

X 

99.86 

— 

Over 3-month Libor. NonccRcbie. Fees 0.15%. (CS first 
Boston) 

Okobank 

$100 

perpt 

1-45 

99.80 

— 

Interest wffl be !.4S over 3-month Libor until 1999, thereafter 
3.45 over. NoncoBabfe. Fees not dadosed (Kidder, Peabody 
Wl.} 

Shenzhen 1/tf‘l Trust & 
Investment 

$150 

2001 

0.64 

100 

— 

Over 6*monih Libor. Ncrcoltabla Fees 2W% Denomination* 
$250,000. (OJ.) 

U5. Guaranteed 
finance 

m. 350,000 

2006 

0.10 

100 

— 

Over 3-month Libor. Average life is 59 years. Fees 025% 
(Banco Commerade iKtana.] 

Samsung Electronics 

Y 20,000 

1999 

0_35 

100 

— 

Over 6-mcrth Libor. Noncollabte. Fees not dedued Denon*- 
notions 10 nuffioti yen. (Donvo Securities.} 

Flxod- Coupons 

Abbey National 

Treasury Services 

$200 

1997 

7 

tom 

9875 

battered a: 99.95. NoneoUebie. Fees IWfc. (Goldman Sachs 
Inti.) 

CS first Boston 

$150 

1998 

7% 

301.215 

IOO .10 

Reoffer »d at 99.89. Noncailable. Fees 1 H%. (C5 fintr Boston.) 

Reed Elsevier 

$200 

1999 

716 

101 K 

99.25 

buffered at 99.55. Noncafable. Fees 154% (CS First Boston.) 

SBC finance 

$200 

1997 

7 

101 .657 

100.W 

bettered at 100.47. NoncaOobte. Fees l*ft. (Swiss Bonk 
Corp.) 

Tokyo 

$500 

2004 

m 

99788 

99.05 

Noncollobfe. Fees 0225%. (®J IntX) 

KFW Wl finance 

DM1,000 

2004 

TVt 

101-565 

100.15 

Reoffer ed at 9929. Noncalabie. Fees 2 Wo. (Wesidetitsdie 
LandesbankJ 

Credit Local de 
’ France. 

FF750 

2004 

m 

700.70 

— 

Interest will be 7V% until 1999, ihei softer increases in steps to 
become 10.05% m 2004. Callable at par in 1999. Fees not 
disclosed (Parishes.) 

Dresdner Bank 
finance 

FF 2,000 

1998 

TA 

100566 

99.10 

Reoffered at 99366. NoncaOable. Fees !*%. (BNP Capital 
MarbtsJ 

Halifax Buikling 
Society 

FF 3,000 

2001 

8 

100.99 

97 JO 

Reoffered at 9928. NotKoftobfe. Fees 1HV (Swiss Bank 
Corp.) 

Swedish Export Credit 

FF 500 

1996 

7 

99.93 

— 

Noncafloble. Fees not dddosed. (Pn-ibai Capitol Markets^ 

Thomson-Brandt Inti 

FF 1,000 

1997 

7V> 

100.96 

9920 

Reoffered at 99275. Noncailable. Fees 1*4%. (Soattft Gtntr- 
ole.} 

European Investment 
Bank 

m 500,000 

1997 

11.45 

101 sa 

100-30 NancaBcbie. Fms UHL (Banco Di Rama.) 

France Telecom 

in 150,00 

1997 

11-40 

101 J25 

100 20 

NeneanablB. Fees 1tt%. (Swiss Bank Corp.) 

Heiaba finance 
Amsterdam 

m 150,000 

1997 

11.60 

101 20 

1Q0.1D Nonadatta. Fob* (Bancn Com met dale tabancL) 

Peugeot finance bitl 

m. 150,000 

1997 

12 

101.495 

100. 10 NoocaHafalo- Fee, 1%%. {OwSto haSaoo.l 

ABN-AMRO Bank 

DF350 

2004 

8 

100J375 

98-60 

Reoffered at 9820. Noncafable. Fees 2%(ABN-AMRO Bank.) 

Commerzbank 
Overseas finance 

C$150 

1999 

m 

101.203 

99.67 

boKared at 99278. Noncailable. Fees 1*4% (MerrA Lynch 
Inti.] 

European Sovereign 
Wl 

C$125 

1998 

816 

101% 

98 % 

battered at 99‘W NoncaUabte. Fees 1W% (Wood Gundy.) 

Australia & New 
Zealand Banking 

Aui$75 

1997 

9% 

100 S3 

100% 

Norcalable. Fees 1WV (Bardayi de Zoete WedcL) 

Bayensche 

Verdrtsbank 

AmSlOO 

2004 

10% 

100.175 

99V4 

Noncaldble. Fees 2)4% (Hombras Bank.) 

Swedish Export Credit 

Y 22,000 

1997 

3 

99.9 9 

— 

Merest will be 3% unt3 Sep). 1995. when issue is colable at 
par, thereafter 3)4% Fees 060% Increased from 20 bilion 
yen. (Yomaichi IrttT.) 

WestVB finance 
(Curacao) 

Y 10,000 

1999 

4% 

10016 

— 

NonaAabte private yfacentent. Fees 025%. Denominceians 
100 miBon yen. [1BJ bit!) 

Equity "Linked 

Commerce Asset 
Holding Berhad 

$120 

2004 

1% 

100 

— 

Semmvoty- Redeemable in 1999 K> yield a premium up to 
14% over Treasuries. Convertoble at expected 6.1% premium. 
Fees 2)*%, (Baring Brothers Int'LJ 

Yang Ming Marine 
Transport 

$140 

2001 

1V 4 

100 

— 

Noncailable. Canvert&ie at an expected 1 % to 6% pretnum. 
Fees 2 W% Tennsto be set Sept. 21. (Baraig Brothers Wl) 

Cookson Group 

£80 

2004 

7 

100 

— 

SemwnnuaHy- Callable at par in 1999. ConvertUe at 298 
pence pet share, a 1745% premium. Fees 214%. (CS first 
Boston) 

Uniden 

Y 10.000 

1998 

% 

TOO 


Semiomualy. Nancdlable. Convertible of an expected Z51% 
premium. Fees 2)9% Terms to be set next week. Pawn 
Europe.) • . 


RJRBomk U.S. Bates Seen Rising by November 

OfferCtue 
ToKKR’s 
Strategy 


By Floyd Norris 

Aw Yonfc Tima Service 

NEW YORK — Bond mar- 
kets may hold the key to the 
great RJR Nabisco Holdings 
Corp. paper shuffle aimed at let- 
ring Romberg, Kravis, Roberts 
& Co. get its money out of the 
largest lackluster deal in history. 

RJR is now paying an extra S7 
milli on in interest each year just 
to keep KKR’s options open. 

The payment is necessary be- 
cause of the complicated and in- 
terrelated provisions in the myri- 
ad of bonds that RJR Nabisco 
issued when Kohlberg Kravis 
made it into the biggest lever- 
aged buyout ever five years ago, 
costing $25 billion. RJR could 
pay on $100 million in 13.5 per- 
cent bonds due in 2001 and refi- 
nance at much lower rates, but 
to do so would trigger provisions 
in other bonds. That would 
make it hard for RJR to spin off 
its tobacco operations or pay a 
big dividend to shareholders. 

If it wants to play games like 
that, it apparently must pay off a 
different bond issue, the $1.5 
billion 10.5 percent notes of 
1 998, which it can only do if the 
2001 bonds are outstanding. It 
would be costly to prepay the 
1998 issue, said Max Holmes, a 
Salomon Brothers Inc. analyst, 
and there is no obvious financial 
reason to do so. Bui it seems 
clear that the reason RJR did 
not pay off the 2001 bond issue 
was to preserve its flexibility. 

Under what terms can the 
1998 issue be paid off? Only if 
Kohlberg Kravis reduces its 
voting stake in RJR to less than 
40 percent. Its deal last week to 
acquire Borden Inc. for half of 
its controlling interest or $2 bil- 
lion in RJR stock will accom- 
plish that But that would have 
happened anyway in Novem- 
ber, when an issue of preferred 
stock converts to common and 
gets more voting rights. 

The word from RJR is that no 
decision has been made on 
whether to try for a tobacco 
spinoff, and the Borden move is 
irrelevant to the decision. If RJR 
moves to refinance the 1998 
bonds, you can bet something is 
up. If it pays off the 2001 issue, 
you’ll know the idea is dead. 

For RJR stockholders, the de- 
cision by KKR to use half its 
RJR shares to buy Borden is a 
depressing sign 'it no longer 
thinks much of its biggest deal. 


DOLLAR: Financial Roller Coaster Gets Ready for One More Plunge 


jr 

tv.vfc- 


r . 


Continued from Page 1 

que Indosuez. “As dollar bonds continue 
to fall, so the probability of a final low on 
the dollar toward 1.47 Deutsche Marks 
increases.” 

The dollar fell Friday on the economic 
news to a low of 1.5305 DM but recovered 
to closed at 1 .5445 DM in New York. 

Traders didn’t read much into the re- 
bound. Trading at the end of the week is 
usually thin and volatile, and the normal 


tendency to dose positions before the 
weekend was accentuated by rumors of 
intervention by the Federal Reserve Board 
and heavy buying by hedge funds. 

The focus of the week was not the dol- 
lar’s wobbliness, but the strength of the 
Swiss franc. The mark and the Swiss franc 
g ampri 0.5 percent against the dollar over 
the week, but the franc rose 0.4 percent 
against the mark — a four-year high. The 
Swiss franc is now up nearly 3 percent 


against the mark from the start of the 
summer, with most of the gains in the past 
month. The franc is expected to continue 
rising as the German election approaches, 
analysts said. 

But looking beyond the immediate wor- 
ries and possible upsets, analysis said, the 
next surprise — the one likely to signal the 
end to the gloom in financial markets — is 
a sharp slowdown in the economic growth 
rate, which will relieve worries about infla- 
tion. 


DIAMONDS: GE-De Beers Antitrust Case Centers on a Meal in Brussels 


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^ Continued from Page 11 

stung by questions raised about his mana- 
gerial acumen because erf a trading scandal 
at the company's Wall Street subsidiary: 
Kidder, Peabody. 

Fartiw this year, Mr. Welch met Ms. Bin- 
go man in Washington and tried to convince 
Her that the government had no case. She 
offered a settlement. Both left dissatisfied. 

In an internal memo, Mr. Welch de- 
nounced the indictment as outrageous. “No 
cate who has looked at it, other than them. 
thtfiics it has any element of criminality,” 
Mr. Welch said in angry tones. “Look, we 
could have settled this case. When we have 
an issue, we go down and we settle up. We 
believe we are so right on this me.” 

The case is focusing attention on the 
once-quietly profitable world of industrial 
diamonds. For GE and De Beers, the dia- 
monds have generated steady cash streams, 
with Wgb -mar gins and few competitors. 

At GE, while industrial diamonds ac- 
count for only a fraction of its $60 billion 
in annual revenue, they have been a ccmsis- 
' tent source of profits — $167 million in the 
years from 1986 to 1989 alone. 

But competitors have sprung up in Ger- 
many, Japan and South Korea as others 
have figured out how to produce synthetic 
diamonds. So GE and De Beers watched 
their dominance gradually erode, with 
market share slipping to about 80 percent 

working in strict secrecy, GE engineers 
won the world contest to produce synthetic 
diamonds in 1954. Now, the company has 
• a reputation for aggressively guarding its 
diamond business. In a recent campaign 
against a foreign company respected or 
usingstolen GE technology, the company 
launched what its general counsel de- 
scribed as “trench warfare,” 

. GE enlisted the services of everyone 
from private detectives who sifted through 
the trash of a former GE scientist to top 
American trade officials, andeven former 
' Secretary of State Henry A Kissinger. 

During World War II, the Justice De- 
' p ancient accused De Beers of refusing iO 
. sell the American government enough nat- 
ural diamonds -for weapons production, 
and it also said De Beers overcharged. 

When GE developed a synthetic dia- 
mond, the impact was immediate at the 
r offices of De Beers Consolidated Mines, 

' the South African cartel that controlled 
every aspect of the world diamond trade. 
De Beers embarked on a crash program. 


but the company was unable to duplicate 
the American alchemy. 

By the early 1960s, however, De Beers 
was supplmen tin g its natural diamonds 
with synthetic versions. GE sued for pat- 
ent infringement- De Beers paid $8 million 
and royalties to license the GE technology. 

The two companies then proceeded to 
divide the world market into a duopoly 
that stood for three decades. De Bern's 
lurking fear, however, was that GE would 
turn its efforts to producing gem-quality 
diamonds, which could devastate the $4 
billion-a-year gem business that generated 
the vast bulk of the cartel's profits. 

After years of experimenting, however, 
GE determined that producing gem-quatity 
diamonds was not economical, according to 
Joyce Hergenban, a GE spokeswoman. Pro- 
duction of synthetic diamonds now out- 
strips the mines by 3 to 1. But gem-quality 
synthetics remain an unfulfilled promise. 

In the early 1 970s, De Beers attracted the 
attention of the Justice Department. Inves- 
tigators suspected it was were trying to gain 
control of American distributors for indus- 
trial diamonds. But, as in the past the cartel 
proved to be outside the jurisdictional reach 
of the Justice Department. 

“We hired a solicitor to serve some pa- 
pers on De Beers in South Africa and the 
company repres e ntative tore them up,” 
said Joel Davidow, who was a Justice De- 
partment lawyer at the time. 

GE mates diamo nds in Worthington, 
Ohio, in a angle-story building surrounded 
by « high fence. Employees must sign confi- 
dentiality agreements not to disclose the 
technology. 

In the summer of 1989, GE suspected a 
security breach. A caller wanted to hire Joe 
Elliott, a GE technician, to oversee dia- 
mond production for an unnamed foreign 
manufacturer- Mr. Elliott’s superiors ad- 
vised him to play along. 

From the return address on an employ- 
ment contract mailed to Mr. Elliott, pri- 
vate detectives discovered that it was sent 
by Chien-Min Sung, manager of GE*s dia- 
mond operations until he resigned in 1984. 

In mid-June, Mr. Elliott and the detec- 
tive arrived at a hotel expecting to find Mr. 

Sung. Instead they met the president of a 
subsidiary of Hjm Corp„ a major Korean 

man ufacturing conglomerate. _ 

For seven weds, private detectives sifted 
through trash bags left outside Mr. Sung's 
home in a Boston suburb. Among the gar- 


bage were shredded documents. When reas- 
sembled, the papers proved to be GE tech- 
nical p lans for manufacturing diamonds, 
according to court testimony. 

GE sued Iljm and Mr. Sung for the return 
of its technology. It also turned over the 
evidence to the U.S. attorney in Boston, 
leading to Mr. Sung's quick indictment for 
selling GE trade secrets to Djin for SI mil- 
lion. Mr. Sung pleaded guilty, but Djin 
argued it had developed much of its own 
technology. GE responded with a campaign 
to pressure Iljin out of the business. 

GE persuaded the two top American 
made officials at the time, the U.S. trade 
representative, Carla A. Hills, and Secretary 
of Commerce Robert A. Mosbacher. to ar- 
gue its case in talks with Korea. GE even 
brought in Mr. Kissinger as a consultant to 
warn Korean officials that they faced retali- 
ation unless JQjin returned the technology. 

A year ago, at a civil trial in Boston, the 
jury 'agreed with GE. The companies 
reached a settlement in which Iljin pays a 
licensing fee. 

Edward J. Russell, once one of GE's 127 
corporate vice presidents worldwide and 
the head of its diam ond division, helped to 
pul GE opposite ihe government. Mr. Rus- 
sell was fired, and responded with lawsuit 
saying he was dismissed for complaining 
about price fixing by GE and De Beers. 

The Justice Department opened an inves- 
tigation in Columbus, near the GE plant. 
Toe inquiry was hampered because many 
witnesses and records were in Europe. 

In the spring of 1993. agents learned 
that an executive of a De Beers affiliate 
was attending the Masters golf tournament 
in Georgia as a GE guest. The executive 
was taken into custody, flown to Colum- 
bus and put before the grand jury. 

But after negotiations with GE, Mr. 
Russell agreed to dismiss his suit and 
signed an affidavit swearing he had no 
“personal knowledge” that the company 
had fixed prices. 

By this time, however, the government 
felt its evidence was strong enough to sup- 
port criminal charges. GE and De Beers 
Centenary A,G„ a De Beers affiliate in 
Switzerland, were indicted on Feb. 17, 
along with Mr. Frenz and Mr. Liotier. 

Mr. Frenz, a German, and Mr. Liotier. 
who is French, are not expected to appear 
in court. While the other defendants will 
be absent, however. General Electric will 
be there. 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dupatches 

NEW YORK — Many U.S. economists 
are predicting that the" Federal Reserve 
Board will wait until mid-November be- 
fore pushing up short-term interest rates, 
but last week's report on American factory 
use has them hedging their bets. 

“We would not expect the Federal Re- 
serve to move rates higher In September, 
even though we would be pleased if it did.” 
said Wayne AngeH, chief economist of Bear, 
Steams '& Co. and a former Fed governor. 

His comments came after a roller-coaster 
week for the American inflation outlook. 
Investors began the weak on a cautious 
note, following the Friday, Sept. 9, news 
that U.S. producer prices were up 0.6 per- 
cent in August, a stronger than expected 
rise. But on Tuesday of last week, a report 
that consumer prices for the month were up 
just OJ percent calmed those fears. 

After other bits of data reinforced the 
low-inflation script — a report by a regional 
Federal Reserve Bank, a drop in jobless 
claims, a rise in business inventories — the 
worries about rising prices neatly vanished. 

But everything changed on Friday, when 
the Fed said capacity utilization at U.S. 
factories was 84.7 percent. That was far 
worse than the 84.1 percent that bond 
traders bad expected, and even that level 
was considered dangerous because a level 
of 84 percent has been associated with 
inflationary pressures in the past. The situ- 
ation was exacerbated by a revision in the 


July utilization rate, to 84.3 percent from 
83.9 percent, which meant the rate had 
been above 84 percent for two months. 

August industrial Output also was a 
stionger-than-expecied 0.7 percent, above 
estimates of 0.5 percent. 

The high level of capacity utilization, 
and the potential bottleneck's it suggests, 
fueled fears that economic growth would 
inevitably result in rising prices. 

When the dust settled on Friday, the 
yield on the benchmark 30-year Treasury 
bond was 7.78 percent, up from 7.71 per- 
cent the previous week. 

Now- that the 30-year bond has broken 
above the 7.75 percent yield that had 

U.S. CREDIT M4RKETS 

served as the top of iLs trading range for 
the past four months, the return is expect- 
ed to head toward 8 percent. 

Meanwhile, because the capacity usage 
statistics added to the evidence favoring a 
Fed interest rate increase, short-term 
yields are expected to continue to rise in 
anticipation of the next tightening. The 
two-year Treasury note, for example, re- 
turned 7.12 percent on Friday, up from 
632 percent a week earlier. 

“Capacity utilization certainly got me 
thinking,” said Dana Johnson, head of 
capital market research at First Chicago. 
“The risk is that the Fed mav move in 


October, mainly if the next labor market 
repon is strong.” 

The plethora of economic data released 
last week will not be repeated this w eek, so 
the bond market will have to look else- 
where for direction. 

The head of one Treasury trading desk 
said the U.S. market could be dominated by 
the European credit markets this week. He 
attributed early Friday losses in Treasuries, 
before the capacity utilization data came 
out, to a sell-off in Europe. He said the 
European markets were just beginning to 
experience the kind of breakdown the U.S. 
credit market went through earlier this year. 

Domestically, traders expect the next big 
influences to come a week from now, with 
Treasury note auctions on Sept. 26 and the 
meeting of the Fed’s policy-setting Federal 
Open Market Committee on Sept. 27. 

Many analysts said that, if the Fed could 
not wait until Nov. 15 to raise rates, it 
would likely move between FOMC meet- 
ings, most likely in mid-October. Only a 
few predicted the Fed would act at the 
SepL 27 meeting. 

Economists foresaw ihe federal funds 
rate on overnight loans between banks, 
which is influenced by the Fed. rising to 
5.25 percent at the end of this year from the 
current 4.625 percent. They also predicted 
the Fed's discount rate, which it charges on 
loans it makes to banks, would rise to 4.50 
percent from the current 4.00 percent. 

(Knight -Bidder, Reuters. ATE A Pi 


Salomon’s Pacific Headache: Derivatives 


By Susan An tills 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK —The deriva- 
tives meltdown of 1994 has not 
been much fun for any of the 
small investors who got caught 
in what should have been solely 
a big players* game, 

Just talk to investors who nev- 
er would have imagined their 
safe money market rands could 
fall below SI a share. 

But few individuals fell the 
sting of derivatives as badly as 
those who used brokers in a 
Hong Kong office of Salomon 
Brothers Inc. 

With Saloman's guidance, 
customers in San Francisco. 
Hong Kong and Singapore pur- 
chased millions apiece in securi- 
ties typically reserved for profes- 
sional investors — collateralized 
mortgage obligations, a land of 
security created from pools of 
home mortgages. 

These complex securities rise 
and fall in conjunction with in- 
terest rates. When interest rates 
rose in February, Salomon’s 
customers faced huge losses 
without the comfort of an im- 
age-conscious mutual-fund 
company that might provide a 
bailout. 

But why did retail investors 
buy the risky stuff that wound 


up toppling Wall Street giants 
in the first place? 

For one thing, Salomon told 
investors that the potentially 
volatile investments were safe, 
claiming they had no “market 
risk.” But CMOs have great in- 
terest-rate risk. 

Hong Kong investors who 
bought the pitch are now at- 
tempting to settle with Salomon 
after having filed with the Na- 
tional Association of Securities 
Dealers to arbitrate against the 
firm. 

Four other investors in San 
Francisco — including one who 
borrowed on his credit cards to 
make the investment — have 
filed a separate arbitration 
complaint. An attorney for a 
Singapore investor was prepar- 
ing another arbitration com- 
plaint last week when Salomon 
suggested settlement talks. 

“The Hong Kong problem." 
as it has become known at Salo- 
mon’s New York headquarters, 
is just one of the headadches 
plaguing the investment firm. 
In July, it reported a quarterly 
earnings plunge of more than 
$200 million because of losses 
in stocks and bonds. Also in 
July, it settled a lawsuit for S 100 
million alleging that it had vio- 


lated antitrust laws in a 1991 
Treasury bond scandal. 

Ray Peffer, lawyer for the 
San Francisco investors, esti- 
mated that $100 million in 
mortgage-backed securities 
may have been sold to retail 
investors through the Hong 
Kong office. While not all those 
Investors would have incurred 
losses, Mr. Peffer questioned 
whether they were appropriate 
investments for individuals. 

The complaints of the Singa- 
pore investor are of particular 
interest because of the tuning of 
the trades. The investor bought 
$11 milli on or derivatives on 
margin in February. By March, 
the investor was already being 
dunned 51.2 million because 
the securities' value had de- 
clined 

But even ?s the Singapore in- 
vestor was awaiting settlement 
of his trades, a Salomon execu- 
tive from New York was poring 
over the books of the troubled 
Hong Kong office to better un- 
derstand the firm’s liability in 
dozens of other problem ac- 
counts containing derivatives. 

Jonathan Kord Lagemann. 
the lawyer for the Singapore in- 
vestor, contends that the execu- 
tive was thus in a position to 
have canceled the client* s pend- 


ing trades or warn him about 
the risk he was taking. 

But Mr. Lagemann said he 
thought Salomon had an incen- 
tive to low ball the value of cus- 
tomers' derivatives so that it 
could accelerate margin calls 
and reduce its own financial 
risk as a lender to its customers. 
When the value of securities 
purchased on credit declines. 
Investors must provide addi- 
tional capital, responding to 
margin calls, to raise their down 
payments to acceptable levels. 

■ Salomon Pari)' Pooper 

A party planner for Salomon 
Brothers investment firm who 
had pleaded guilty to bilking 
her employer "of $1.1 million, 
has been sentenced to five years 
probation and ordered id un- 
dergo psychiatric counseling. 
Reuters reported from New 
York. 

Kathy Tompkins. 3$. had 
used the more than $1.1 million 
she stole from the Wall Street 
firm to buy herself designer 
clothes and jewelry from such 
fashionable stores as Saks Fifth 
Avenue and Bergdorf Good- 
man. 

At her sentencing Friday. 
Ms. Tompkins apologized io 
her former employer for the 
trouble she caused. 


MINORCO 

These results 6rmly establish Minorco as an operating company. 
Despite relatively weak metals prices for almost all of the twelve 
months, our operating earnings have increased significantly as a 
result of the diversity of our natural resource interests. 

J. Ogflvic Thompson, Chairman 

M Operating earnings increased by 43% to USS201 million - strong contributions 
from the Industrial Minerals and Agribusiness sectors. 

I Earnings before extraordinary items decreased by 12% to USS222 million. 

I Investment disposals realised US$508 million and Minorco invested USS480 million in 
existing and new businesses. 

I Major projects commenced - expansion and redevelopment at Man cos Blancos in Chile 
and construction of a major newsprint facility at Aylesford Newsprint in the UK. 

I Encouraging results from the continuing evaluation of five major base metals and gold 
projects in South America. 

I In August 1994, Terra announced the proposed acquisition of Agricultural Minerals 
and Chemicals - more than doubling its production of nitrogen fertilisers and 
establishing it as a US major producer of methanol. 

H Second interim dividend of 38US cents per share. 


FOR THE TWELVE MONTHS TO JUNE JO 


LlSS millions: 

1994 

i'ff.i 

iitn.iuiliii-ifi 


IU- 1 ..L.I 

Sales 

3,136.1 

2-77f.-4 

Operating earnings 

200.5 

I.VJ.H 

Earnings before taxation 

308. S 

34n.l ) 

Earnings before extraordinary items 

221.9 

251,0 

Earnings jfter extraordinary items 

226.3 

33*7.7 

US$ per share: 

Earnings before extraordinary items* 

0.99 

1.12 

Dividends deci-ired 

0.57 

U.57 

'U.K-J li«r the nim-iit .mil pnor perimh mi 

J tuillnm sli.in.i- m 



SECOND INTERIM DIVIDEND 

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IVn'intvr .>!. I'i'M .inJ w p.i\jh!v nil Ni'U'iiiK'i in %li ir.'hn.McT' I'l u'i'nrii tin l Viiilm 1 1. |*M4 
A M'loiul init-mii fi-pt-n [• >r iIk* r.n-l-.c m m Jiwr .«l. r**'4 v.rll Iv niiihsl (lu -tvir.-liwliiov m, 
,, r jtxim Vi'iiiiIht. T P' M I'l’pitr* iiijj In* i4'i.m u*tl trnin i!k UK irui-lcr .ipmi. M.n « Liv, Uoirtir.ir-. 
Ihumif Hint*-. .'J Jk-t IiiiIi.uii Kniti. litvU-iihini. K.-nr, UK.' 4‘I U. t-.iipLnitf 


MINORCO 


MINOKCOSOCIETE ANONYME. LUXEMUOUIU:, SfclTEMUEK 13. I'W-I 




r.“ 





i. Page 14 


Belgium to Replace 
Phone Executives 


Conyiledby Our Stuff From Dispatches 

BRUSSELS — The govern- 
ment plans to change the top 
management of Belgacom EPA, 
the state telephone company, 
which has been hurt by scandals 
and internal strife. Elio di 
Rupo, the telecommunications 
minister, said Sunday. 

He said the change should oc- 
cur when Belgacom becomes a 
limited liability company, prob- 
ably with operating autonomy, 
in about four to eight weeks. 

“Our intention is to start with 
a clean slate,” Mr. di Rupo said. 
“The government must nave the 
possibility to name a new 
team,” he said. 

The government said in 


TR EUROPEAN HARMONY FUND 
FCP 


2, Boulevard Royal 
LUXEMBOURG 


TR EUROPEAN HARMONY FUND will pay a dividend of USD 
0,50 per share on Sepleraher 2 1st. 1 904. 

Shares are traded Ex-dividend as from September 19th, 1994. 

The dividend is payable to holders of hearer shares against 
presentation of coupon no. 6 to the following: 


BANQUE INTERNATIONALE A LUXEMBOURG 
2, Boulevard Royal, 2953 Luxembourg 
GRAND-DUCHY OF LUXEMBOURG 


THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
of 

TR EUROPEAN HARMONY FUND MANAGEMENT COMPANY S A 

Societc Anonyme 




This week’s topics: ^ 

O Telecommunications: The Global Free-For-All '& 
o A Glum Diagnosis For Biotech 
o More U.S. Investment Is Flowing In To Russia 
o Back To Business In Belfast? peTitj 

v - 'it 

o Japan's Messed Up Market Si 


Now available at your newsstand! 


BusinessWeek Infernal Iona I 
14, av d'Ouchy, CH-1006 Lausanne Tel. 41-21-617-4411 
For subscriptions can UK 44-628-23431 Hong Kong 852-523-2939 


sm&ZF 

.\v ZJ*' 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 1994* 


WORLD STOCKS IN REVIEW 


SHORT COVER 


Yio Agence Francr-Prcuo 




Amsterdam 


March it was seeking a partial 
privatization of the company, ei- 
ther with an industrial partner 
taking a minority stake or by 
floating stocks on the market 

In the past weeks, Belgacom 
alleged mismanagement and a 
dash of personalities between 
Bessel Kmc, the chief executive 
officer, and Benoit Remiche, 
hrad of the supervisory board. 

Last week, Mr. di Rupo can- 
celed an administrative council 
meeting after be was told by 
five of six members of Belga- 
com’s executive committee they 
no longer had confidence in Mr. 
Remiche. 

(Reuters, AP) 


U.S. data that raised raising fears of 
inflation pushed prices lower in the dollar- 
sensitive Amsterdam shares market last 
week, with the AEX index dropping 5.39 
points, to 407.58 points. 

Trading was heaviest Friday when the 
market lost 4.03 points, brokers said. 

The publishing companies Elsevier, 
VNU and Wolters KJuwer fell sharply and 
DSM, the chemicals maker, was hit at the 
end of the week by profit-taking after a 
recent rally. 

Among the international shares, Akzo 
Nobel renewed the previous week's falls to 
drop S.90 guilder to 206.80. Roval Dutch- 
/ Shell fell 2.70 guilder to 192^0. 

Philips fell 1.90 guilder to 55.60 and 
Unilever fell S.90 guilder to 19630. 


trade after gaining 122.12 on Thursday 
and Friday. 

Wall Street’s recovery, as the U.S. infla- 
tion fears eased late in the day. proved a 
stronger factor than renewed Sino-British 
squabbling over Hong Kong's future or the 
decision by three Jardine Matheson units 
to delist next March. 

Daily turnover averaged 436 billion 
Hong Kong dollars (55 1 million US), com- 
pared with 5.87 billion dollars the week 
before. 


Paris 


London 


Paris shares hit their lowest level since 
November 1993 last week, depressed by 
US news on inflation, which dampened 
hopes for interest rate cuts in the U.S. and 
Europe and sent the CAC-40 index 
dropped 1.24 percent to end the week at 

Since the start of the year, the market 
has lost 15.15 percent and since the start of 
the current trading month the market has 
dropped 4.07 percent. 


German Production Expected to Rise 

FRANKFURT (Bloomberg) — German industrial production r ^ 

in the Western sector is expected to gradually pwk op -this year y Ifi if 1 # 4 
and in. 1995, a German research nsUtuie . b» W 


and in 1995, a German researcu iumuuw ■ 

Businesses expect production to climb by2J5 percent this year . i* 
and by 33 percent £ 1995, acconhng to the results of a survey fUf/Jl/ J 
conducted by the # * 


ana oy percent in iw, ^ 

conducted by the Ifo Institute for EconormcRttgi^. 
Meanwhile, in Leipzig, the economics minister, Gflnth^ Ketrodt, 

said there was room to lower Germany’s bank-lending rates, but new® 

unsure if the Bundesbank would choose to do so. 


Frankfurt 

Frankfurt stocks fell sharply last week, 
depressed by fears of revived U.S. infla- 
tion, a weak dollar, and growing doubts 
that the Bundesbank will further reduce 


interest rates. 

The DAX index managed a small rally 
on Friday, when it gained 032 percent, but 
it finished the week with a loss of 66.42 
points, or 3 percent, compared with the 
previous Friday’s close. 

Commerzbank said the market would 
remain under “interest-rate pressure” for 
the near term. Yields on the capital market 
have now reached a critical level, it said. 


and only a pricking of the “interest rate 
bubble” will make the share market attrac- 


bubble” will make the share market attrac- 
tive a gain 

In the banking sector, Deutsche Bank 
ended the week at 703 DM and Commerz- 
bank at 314 DM. 


The London Stock Exchange fell last 
week, reacting to a half-point rise in British 
interest rates up to 5.75 percent, a jump in 
inflation and several disappointing com- 
pany results. 

The Financial Times- Stock Exchange 
100 index fell 743 points to 3.065.1 on 
Friday, down 2.3 points, taking the index 
to its lowest level for two months. 

Shares slumped sharply the first three 
days of the week with the rise in interest 
rates was reasonably well received on 
Monday but dealers then took fright after 
a surprise jump in 12-month inflation to 
2.4 percent ana a higher- than-expected fall 
in unemployment — of 34,000. 

In pharmaceuticals, Fisons slumped 28 
penc, to 123 after first-half pre-tax profits 
dropped 26.7 percent. 

Next, the retailer, fell 18.5 pence to 243, 
despite a 60 percent jump in six-month 
results, after it issued a cautious statement 
for the next few months. 


Singapore 


Share prices slipped slightly on the 
Stock Exchange of Singapore last week in 
quiet trading with most interest concen- 
trated in Malaysian speculative counters. 

The key market indicator, the Straits 
Tunes Industrials index ended the week 
2.78 points lower, at 2397.18, while the 


broader-basal All-Singapore SES index 
fell 1.78 points, to 569.98 Doints. 


Wife Says Sony Chief Is Recovering ■ 

TOKYO — The Sony Corp. chairman. AJdoMoriffl, 69, is recovering 
from a stroke he suffered last November and is momtonng his 
company’s business performance, a newspapernas 
Hiswife, Yoshiko. told the Sankei Shimbun that he spent the 
summer rehabilitating at his home. She said Mr. Monta was now 
able to write his name in English and enjoyed playing tennis, _ 
Mr. Morita was expected to take the top post in the influential 
Japan Federation of Economic Organization, which is now head- 
ed by Shoichiro Toyoda, president of Toyota Motor Corp. 


vi** 


Tokyo 


Milan 


Zurich 


Hong Kong 


Stock prices dipped in Hong Kong last 
week but dealers said thet exected the 
market to pick up this week and predicted 
the Hang Seng Index will break the 10.000 
mark a gain later this week. 

The blue-chip barometer went into the 
weekend at 9,96832, down 176.50, or 1.74 
percent, but it looked firmly on a recovery 


Prices rose agains t the trend in Europe 
last week and the MJbtel index jumped 
3.23 percent, to 10,784 points. 

The change in mood on the market 
which has fallen sharply in recent weeks, 
followed a meeting between government 
and union officials averting threats of a 
general strike. 

Fiat Generali and Montedison all rose 
sharply; Fiat jumped 325 percent 

Montedison gained 5.7 percent on the 
week after it said it had returned to profit. 


market UBS dropped 14 francs to 1,191, 
SBS fell two to 376 and CS Holding lost 


SBS fell two to 3‘ 
nine to 564. 


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Sigh of Relief for Exxon 


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i Vns York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Exxon Corp. stock seems likely to benefit 
from the ruling late Friday that kept the punitive damages it 
had to pay for its Alskan oil spill to $5 billion. Fear of the 
worst, a $15 billion award, had pushed the stock down since 
the Exxon Valdez trial began last spring. 

But after a federal jury in Anchorage. Alaska, announced 
an award of S5 billion on Friday, there was a sigh of relief on 
Wall Street Even though the New York Stock Exchange had 
closed for the weekend, other markets open, and within 
minutes, the stock rose SI 50. 

Exxon's shares closed regular trading Friday at S58.625. 
The shares ended 1993 at $63. 125. 

Stock market analysts said that when trading on the New 
York Stock Exchange opens Monday, the slock should con- 
tinue going up. They said the award would not harm Exxon, 
which earned $5.3 billion last year and has $2 billion in cash. 

“The scary pari that the jury could award $15 billion or 
higher is now behind the company." said Fred Leuffer, an oil 
analyst for Bear Steams-'Co. “Today, the worst-case scenario, 
is $5 billion." 

Some analysts think that Exxon has a good chance of 
getting thejury’s award lowered either on appeal or by asking 
Federal Judge H. Russel Holland to adjust the amount. 


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Ex-Guinness Head’s Trial Said Unfair 


Share prices fell in Tokyo last week as a 
□umber of major investors sold their hold- 
ings to window-dress earnings results for 
the six months to September. 

The 225-issue Nikkei Stock Average 
dosed the week at 19,796.26, down 101.62 


LONDON (Reuter) — The trial of the former Guinness_PLC 
chairman, Ernest Saunders, on company-fraud^ charges will be 
ruled “unfair” by the European Commission of Human Rights 
this week, British newspapers said Sunday. , 

Mr. Saunders was sentenced to five years in prison in 19W o n -15 
counts, including false accounting and theft, in connection with Goin- 
qgss's takeover of a rival fern in 1986. He was freed in 1991 after serving 


points or 0.5 percent from a week earlier. 
The broader Tokyo Stock Price Index of 


one thir d of a sentence previously reduced on appeaL 
Mr. Saunders complained that statements obtained from him # 
under compulsory powers by the Department of Trade and - 
Industry were used against him at triaL The government said Mr. 
Saunders was assisted by his legal advisers during questioning. 


The broader Tokyo Stock Price Index of 
all first-section issues shed 10J9 points to 
end at 1.576.21. 


Shares fell with the Swiss Performance 
Index down 20.07 points or 1.1 percent, to 
1,723.62 points. 

Dealers said the market was led by U.S. 
interests and that foreign investors domi- 
nated trading. 

Nestle fell 17 Swiss francs to 1,200 de- 
spite news of satisfactory results in line 
with expectations. 

Among the banks, a key sector in the 


Sports Executive Invokes the Fifth 

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The president of the Los Angelc 
Kings hockey dub, Bruce McNalL under investigation by a U.S 


grand jury for bank fraud, repeatedly invoked his Fifth Amend- 
ment right against self-in crimination at a bankruptcy hearing 
when asked if he hid funds overseas. 

Mr. McNall refused to answer when asked if he had transferred 


large sums of money to bank accounts in Switzerland. Eng l an d 
and Liechtenstein. Most of the questions came from the lawyer for 


and Liechtenstein. Most of the questions came from me lawyer ior 
Mr. McNall's largest creditor. Credit Lyonnais Bank Nederland. 
The bank daims to be owed more than $121 million. 

He sold his 72 percent interest in the National Hockey League 
last spring to Joseph Cohen and Jeffrey Sudikoff. 


Cycle & Carriage to Buy Jardine Unit 

HONG KONG (Bloomberg) — Jardine Matheson Holdings 
Ltd. plans to sell its 75 percent stake in Jardine International Motor 
Holdings for about 4 bilBon Hoag Kong dollars ($513 million) to 
Cycle & Carriage, the South China Morning Post reported. 

Cycle & Carnage, which is 24 percent owned by another Jardine 
company, Jardine Strategic Holdings Ltd, distributes Mercedes- 
Benz cars in Singapore and Malaysia. Jardine Motors has the 
Mercedes franchise in Hong Kong and a distributorship in China. 

All of Janline's Hong Kong listed companies except Jardine 
Motor have announced plans to delist from the local stock 
exchange within the next six months. 


Autoworkers Call Oft Strike in Brazil 


SAO PAULO (Bloomberg) — About 53,000 Brazilian t . 
autoworkers accepted a bonus and agreed to return to work^ 1 . 
Monday, taking the wind out of the first strike to test the y 
government's 75-day old economic program. 

The autoworkers agreed to a productivity bonus of equal to 595 
hours of pay. ending a weeklong strike at Autolatina Brasil SA, a J 
joint venture of Volkswagen AG and the Fold Motor Co^ and the 
Brazilian truckmaking units of Diamler Benz AG, Toyota do _ 
Brasil SA and Scania do Brasil Ltd _ 

About !0 parts manufacturers refused to grant the bonus to T 
1 1,000 workers, who remained on strike. The strike began Sept. 12 Bi 
over demands for salary increases and a return of monthly cost-of- 
living adjustments. 


OAQ NATION! 


For the Record 


Enichem SpA and Norway’s Norsk Hydro broke off talks to 
merge their fertilizer activities in southern Europe, II Solc-24 Ore 
newspaper reported. (Bloomberg) 

Customs (hides on imported maiurfactuned goods in Tunisia 
have been reduced to 10 percent from 15 percent. President Zinc 
Abidine ben Ali announced. (Reuters) 


FEB. 16-18 


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SimintSays Loss 
Eclipsed Capital 


Bloomberg Business New 

ROME — The Italian fash- 
ion company Simint SpA said 
Sunday that inventory write- 
downs forced it into a heavy 
loss in the year ending April 30, 


almost wiping out its capital. , } 


PARIS 


The company, controlled by 
the designer Giorgio Armani 
and institutional investors, said 
it lost 221.5 billion lire ($141 
million) in the year to April 30, 
compared with profit of 1.6 bil- 
lion lire in the previous year. 

Simint said its shareholder eq- 
uity would shrink to 1.03 billion ; 
lire from 105 billion a year ago. . 
The loss was swelled by charges 
from the sale of U.S. operations. •, 




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TIF Moves 
To Trump 
The Aces 


CampUeAbv Our Staff Frctn iMjpatka 

HONG KONG — Hie 
International Tennis Fed- 
eration. hoping to blunt the 
advantage of power servers 
and make the sport more 
entertaining, is modifying 
the balls that will be used in 

tournaments. 

The new balls, to be put 
into use immediately, will 
be used in all men’s, wom- 
en’s and junior events, as 
well as the ITF’s four 
Grand Slam tournaments 
and international competi- 
tions such as the Davis Cup 
and Federation Cup. 

“Harder balls will be 
used on slow surfaces and 
softer ball s on faster sur- 
faces," the fTPs president, 
Brian Tobin, said Saturday 
at the end of the four-day 
anmml meeting. 

Tournaments nsmg fast 
surfaces like Wimbledon’s 
grass wil now use softer and 
therefore slower balls to 
promote rallies. 

Clay court tournaments 
such as the French Open 
will use harder and faster 
balls t o add variety. 

The ITF also put in a 20- 
second limit between 
points for tournaments un- 
der its jurisdiction. The As- 
sociation of Tennis Profes- 
sionals, which governs the 
men’s tour, has experi- 
mented with the 20-second 
rule, a reduction of five sec- 
onds. but decided against it 
last week. 

“We hope that by chang- 
ing the rule to 20 seconds, rt 
will encourage the men's 
tour" to shorten its time 
betwee n po ints, Tobin said. 

The ITF also announced 
it would plow SI milli on 
back into the game through 
grants to its 191 national 
members. 

Prize money for the Da- 
vis Cup will rise by more 
than 6 percent next year to 
more than S7 million. 

(AP, Reuters) 


SIDELINES 


Chavez Defeats Taylor, Decisively 

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Julio Cdsar Ch&vez knocked Meldrick 
Taylor down with a left hook, then finished him with a flurry of 
punches in the eighth round of their rematch to retain his WBC 
supa lightweight title. 

Taylor, who had lost to Chivez four years ago when the referee 
stopped the bout with only two seconds left, had gone down 
seconds earlier Saturday night and was talrfng a beating to the 
head when the referee stepped in and stopped the bout. 

In other bouts on the raid. Ricardo L6pez of Mexico retained 
his WBC straw-weight title with a fiist-round knockout of Yods- 
ing Au Saengmorokoi of Thailand and Gabriel Ruelas won the 
WBC super featherweight title by decision over fellow American 
James Lerja, 

• Lee Hyung Chul of South Korea stopped Japan's Kaisuya 
Onizuka in the ninth round in Tokyo to win his WBA j unio r 
bantamweight title on Sunday. 

NHL Sides Are Set to Resume Talks 

TORONTO (AP) — NHL players have proposed a 5 percent 
tax on everything from salaries to gate receipts, which, they say, 
would raise S3S million for small market teams and end the 
stalemate in collective bargaining talks. 

The NHL commissioner, Gary Bettman, and the union’s execu- 
tive director. Bob Goodenow, met for three hours on Saturday 
and were expected to talk again Sunday to discuss resuming 
formal negotiations. 

For the Record 

Wayznan Tisdale signed a one-year contract with the Phoenix 
Suns, who also received NBA approval of D ann y Manning's one- 
year, $1 million contract signed last week. (AP) 

Ron Harper, a free-agent guard, was signed to a multiyear 
contract as the Chicago Bulls added another new face to their 
changing look. (AP) 


Michael Jordan wil] report to their Arizona Fall League t«in 
Sept. 23, the Chicago white Sox said. (AP) 


on 



Woosnam Wins 
British Masters 


Ian Woosnam felt a charge coming on as be shot a course record-tying 63 onStmdayT 


Compiled by Our Staff Ftcm Dupauha 

WOBURN. England — Ian 
Woosnam tied the course re- 
cord with a 9-under-par 63 and 
followed it with a 67 Sunday as 
he came from far back to win 
the British Masters golf tourna- 
ment by four strokes. 

Woosnam, seven shot behind 
Seve Ballesteros at the start of 
the day and four behind Miguel 
Angel Martin with nine holes to 
play, went from 3-under-par to 
17 under in 36 holes to finish at 
271. Ballesteros finished at 273; 
Colin Montgomerie and Bern- 
hard Longer shared third place 
at 276. 

“It says to a lot of people. 
‘Don’t ever write me off.’ " said 
the 36-year-old Welshman, who 
has struggled with back pain for 
several years. “People think I 
am sitting in Jersey with enough 
money to stay there, but I want 
to win every tournament 1 play. 
I want to get back to world No. 
1 and to winning major titles 
again. 

•‘Tins victory is really satisfy- 
ing. It has been said that I had 
lost interest and didn't seem to 
be trying. 1 may own a jet, but 
it’s got to be paid for." 

Woosnam, now $162,495 


John Daly Agrees to Take Leave 
A Third Time From PGA Tour 


JVew York Times Service 

GAINESVILLE, Vir ginia — John 
Daly, pro golfs troubled star, and the 
PGA Tour have agreed that he will not 
play this year’s last 1 1 events whDe he 
“prepares himself physically and men- 
tally for coining back to the PGA 
Tour" in 1995, according to 71m Fin- 
chem, the tour’s commissioner. 

lies about Daly’s status from The blew 
York Times and The Washington Post, 
Finchem declined to say what sort of 
mental and physical preparation the 28- 
year-old golfer would undergo. 

“This is a voluntary decision." Fin- 
ch em said. “This obviously comes af- 
ter a history of John having some diffi- 
culties in meeting our expectations of 
players on tour.” 


This would be the third time Daly 
has been subject to an enforced ab- 
sence from the PGA Tour, and stems 
from a dispute he had with the father 
of another golfer in a parking lot after 
the final round of the World Series of 
Golf on Aug. 28 

Daly twice hit his tee shot into the 
group ahead of him during the final 
round of the tournament, coming close 
to hitting a club professional named 
Jeffrey Roth. 

Afterward, Daly had a run-in with 
Roth's parents, first exchanging words 
and then scuffling briefly with Bob 
Roth, 60, who jumped on Daly's back. 
The two were separated by spectators, 
but Daly injured his back, which al- 
ready had been bothering him. 


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International Team Trails, 12-8, 
Alter Rallying in Presidents Cup 


in another incident that might have 
precipitated this latest action. Daly, 
was quoted in an interview published ‘ 
during the British Open in July as 
saying that some PGA Tour players 
used drugs and should be drag-tested. 
He later said he never meant to imply 
that PGA Tour players used drugs. 

He encountered some player resent- 
ment upon his return to the United 
States, with Curtis Strange remarking 
that Daly "should crawl back under 
the rock where he came from." 


Washington Past Service 

GAINESVILLE, Virginia — The 
outcome of the inaugural Presidents 
Cup was still in doubt going into Sun- 
day’s dozen singles matches, the inter- 
national team having rallied after win- 
ning just two of the first 10 matches. 

It charged back Saturday morning, 
then faltered in the late afternoon ram 
as the U.S. team won three of the day’s 
last five matches. But, by the end of the 
alternate shot competition and 104 
hours of nonstop, yet agonizingly slow 
play, the international team trailed by 
12-8 going into the final round. 

The Americans could thank the 
team of Corey Pavin and Loren Rob- 
erts for providing a bit of cushion. 
They were 3 down with six holes to go 
against Craig Parry of Australia and 


Fulton Allem of South Africa, then 
won four of the last six holes for an 
improbable 1-up victory. 

The international side, already with- 
out the services of ailing Greg Nor- 
man. still made a decent showing with- 
out a major contribution from Nick 
Price. A second straight oppressively 
hot and humid day forced Price to take 
himself out of the afternoon competi- 
tion. having played three matches, 
with a loss and two ties. 

Vijay Singh of Fiji helped gel two 
victories for the international team. He 
and Japan’s Tsukasa Watanabe posted 
a 3-and-l victory over Jay Haas and 
Scott Hoch in the morning then Singh 
teamed with Steve Elkinglnn of Aus- 
tralia to defeat Jeff Maggert and John 
Huston. 3 and 2, in the afternoon. 


closer to paying for his plane, 
was not in the picture through 
the first two rounds over the 
6,940-yard Duke's Course on 
Friday and Saturday. But on a 
d3y that saw 18 changes at the 
top of the leaderboard. he cut 
loose in the third round, on 
Sunday morning, with six bird- 
ies in the first nine holes. Then 
after an even-par front nine ir. 
the afternoon, he burst out with 
four successive birdies from the 
10th ami another at the iotn. 

Ballesteros, still ahead by one 
after 54 boles, faded to a 72 in 
the afternoon. The two rounds 
were held Sunday because rain 
had washed out plav on Thurs- 
day. 

Ballesteros, who took the 
lead with a second-round 6? 
and held it with a 64 on Sunday 
morning, said, "Ian played fan- 
tastic to shoot 14 under today. 
In a way 1 feel 1 won the tourna- 
ment. for today he was playing 
on a different course than the 
rest of us." 

For much of the final round, 
the leader was Martin, who 
birdied the first five holes and 
held a three-*.. mt lead at the 
turn, four ahead of Woosnam. 
The turnaround began when 
Martin double-bogeyed the 
14th as Woosnam birdied the 
16th. 

Martin bogeyed 15 and 16 
and triple-bogeyed the long Iasi 
hole. He ended up in a tic for 
seventh place. 

Woosnam was helped to his 
63 by a 35-fool (10-meier) puu 
from off the green that went in 
at the 13th hole. He also sank 
putts of 60, 25. 15 and 10 feet in 
the round. His longest birdie 
putt in the afternoon was from 
12 feet at the 16th. where he 
took the lead. 

"It just proves that when 1 
find the dick, this is what hap- 
pens,,’ he said. “My score drops 
by six or seven shots. 

T've had to hit with a shorter 
back swing in recent tourna- 
ments, but since I started the 
exercises, my back is loosening 
up. It felt fine this week." 

(AP, Reuters} 


NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET 


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Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 1994 


Monday 

SPORTS 

Italian Crew Upsets French 
In Rowing Championship 


TJie Associated Press 

INDIANAPOLIS — Italy 
knocked off the world champi- 
on, France, on Sunday in die 
four without coxswain final of 
the 1994 World Rowing Cham- 
pionships. 

The Italian tram won in 5 
minutes, 48.44 seconds, pulling 
ahead at 1,500 meters ana hold- 
ing on. The French team’s time 
was 5:49.82. Britain, with the 


champions, Jonny and Greg 
Searie, won the bronze medal. 

“Usually at the first 1,000 we 
are not the leader, 7 ’ said Jean- 
Christophe Rolland of the 
French crew. “In this race, we 
were. We were up too fast.” 

Andre Willms of Germany 
celebrated his 22d birthday by 
winning the open weight single 
sculls title, defeating Xeno 
Mueller of Switzerland and Iz- 
tok Cop of Slovenia. 

Tougher false start rules 
spelled catastrophe for Cana- 
da's .former world champion, 
open weight single sculler Silken 


I-anmann, who jumped the flag 
with two other boats and, on 
the restart, came out too fast all 
by herself. Launuum, who had 
fought back to competitive 
form from a serious injury two 
years ago to win an Olympic 
bronze medal, was immediately 
disqualified. 

Trine Hansen of Denmark, 
last year's bronze medalist, won 
the openweight women's sculls 
title, battling the length of the 
course with fCathrin Boron of 
Germany. Anne-Elise Bredael 
of Belgium won the bronze 
medal. 

In the openweight double 
sculls, the 1993 silver medalists 
Rolf Thorsen and Lars Bjoen- 
ness of Norway took the men's 
gold, and Philippa Baker and 
Brenda Lawson of New Zea- 
land defended their women’s ti- 
tle. 

In other lightweight races, It- 
aly won the men's pair without 
coxswain, ahead of Russia and 
Ireland. Denmark defeated 
Australia and Germany for the 


men's lightweight four without 
coxswain title. 

Romania's Constanta Pipota 
won the gold modal in the wom- 
en’s lightweight single sculls, 
ahead of Laurien Vermulst of 
the Netherlands and Pia Vogel 
of Switzerland. 

Peter Hairing of Great Brit- 
ain and Niall O’Toole of Ire- 
land fought for the lightweight 
men’s single sculls title, with 
Hairing prevailing. 

“The best sculling I've done 
all year was out there.” Hairing 
said. “It was rice to peak at the 
world championships.’’ 

The American women’s light- 
weight four without coxswain 
applied power and knowledge 
to seal the victory, as Britain 
(silver) and China (bronze) 
closed in fast at the finish line. 

The Romanian four with cox- 
swain, sparing no horsepower 
for the eights race they would 
run later in the day, defeated a 
come-from- behind United 
Slates crew and the Nether- 
lands to defend their title. 



For Auguin, Wilds Before Waves 

By Barbara Lloyd curly hair, looks more like a iaid- with an automatic pilot that substi- 

Nfw York Tma Service back folk singer than a hardened tries joysticks for a conventional 

CHARLESTON, South Carolina seafarer. But he is- wily enough to steering wheel. 

— Solo sailors rarely have the luxury know that taking a vacation so dose There is a tiller for driving the 
of time before a major ocean compe- to the race's beginning helps clear his boat in an emergency, but if Auguin 
tition. But Christophe Auguin of mind. The tactic — time away from has to use it, he knows he will have 
France, the defending champion of the sea followed by intense weeks of lost the race, 
the BOC 'round-the-world race, re sailing — won him first place in the • a-j « u about Auguin, 


the BOC 'round-the-world race, re sailing — - won him first plat 
ccntly did the unthinkable: He took 1990-91 BOC competition, 
off for the wilds of Idaho while ev- Auprin is part of a contin 


“rig — - ww him first place w the ^ about Auguin, 

’90-91 BOC competition. and French offshore sailors in gener- 

Augtnn is part of a contingency of ^ ^-h malcra than unbeatable? 
reeoffshore French sailors who are TcaHpiy . Aiiti g i ti cr, the only woman 


eryone else was preoccupied with three offshore French sailors who are Isabelle Autissier, the only woman 
getting ready to sail again favored to win this race. In ^ ^ a theory. 

FreMh toddietiS Sh&k Souuhemjto 
to not think about the race. The BOC have dominated. desism new systems, and to find 

is long — nine months. It is not In the last race, Auguin beat the ^ j J^Fnodi way al- 
[Wsable to have concentration all prewous record o£ 134 toys by wo tf^raJTtodo iSme- 

that tune.” weeks. Now he wants to shave anoth- J 

For Auguin, “in the blue” means er 10 days off his mark of 120 days, . 

27,000 miles of open ocean in a 60- although in previous races the qua- She and Jean Luc^n Dra Heeoe 
foot sailboat. He and 19 other solo drennial competition began and end- of France are- expected to give All- 
sailors left here Saturday, bound for ed in Newport, Rhode Island, in- SPri his biggest (iallenge. "Ut their 


Cape Town in a 12-knot southeast stead of Charleston. But the 


breeze. difference to Cape Town, about 500 Challenge coma De moicen uus umF- 

The weather, which had been miles, is apt to be negligible. Autissier sees David Scully of Chi- 
le^' warm all week, was likely to get hoc- The Class I yachts, all 60 feet, can cago as a dose rival whose boat, 

m ter still as the 40- to 60-foot boats be expected to finish faster than the Coyote, has the potential to win. 

% headed 6,800 miles south. After Class Et racers, which include 11 That is the Coyote that only recently 

j*T;. Cape Town, the boats stop in Sydney smaller yadus from 40 to 50 feet in has lisen from the nrins of a 1992 

__ _ _ , , and Punia del Este, Uruguay, before length. attempt at an around-the-worid vefc- 

Minoru Saito of Japan checked the lines heading back to Charleston next Auguin has a new carbon fiber ture in which its skipper, Mike PTant 

aboard hits yacht, the Shuten-Dohji n, at the spring. yacht, Sceta Calberson. The most of the United States, disappeared at 

starting fine of the BOC ’round- the- world race. Auguin, a slight man with thick, radial of the fleet, it was designed sea. 


country’s stranglehold on the BOC 
Challenge could be broken this tinte. 
Autissier sees David Scully of Chi- f. 


The Class I yachts, all 60 feet, can cago as a dose rival whose boat, 
be expected to finish faster than the Coyote, has the potential to win. 
Class U racers, which include 11 That is the Coyote that only recently 
smaller yachts from 40 to 50 feet in has risen from the ruins of a 1992 


yadtt, Sceta Calberson. The most of the United States, disappeared at 
radial of the fleet, it was designed sea. 


P TTTTTTT 


Top 25 College Results 

How the lop 25 teams Is the AwdaM 
P reaf cottcve football pod fared tan weak: 

1. Florida (3-0) boat No. i5Tmnanoe-3)-& 
Noxf.- of AUsteelpPL Oef. 1; 2 Nebraska (M) 
boat No. 13 UCLA 49-21. Naxt: vs. Pacific. 
Saturday; 3. Florida SWf (Ml beat Wake 
Forest 56-14. Naxt: vs. Na. 14 norm CoraUna. 
Saturday; 4 Mktrfgon (2-0) did not May. 
Next: vs. No. 7 Colorado, Saturday; S.Mkanl 
(2-0) did not play. Next: vs. Na.1V Washington. 
Saturday, -i. Peso State (3-0) beat Iowa M-21. 
Naxt: vs. Rutgers. Saturday; 7, Colorado (Ml 
beat Ho. W W is cons i n 55-17. Noxtr at Ho. 4 
Michigan; 5 Notre Dome (2-1) beat Michigan 
State 21-2Q, Next: vs. Purdue. Saturday; 9, 
Arizona (241) dW not May. Next: at Stanford, 
Saturday; N> Wisconsin (VI) lost to No. 7 
Colorado 55-17. Next: vs. indkma, Saturday; 

1L Ax barn (34) beat Louisiana State 30-21. 
Next: vs. East Tilling om Stiita, Saturday: n, 
Alabama 0-0) beat Ariaraat 165 Next: vs. 
Tldane. Saturday.- IX UCLA (Z-I) tost to No. 2 
Nebraska 47-21. Next: vs. No. 24 Washington 
Slate. Saturday; 15 Tenet AAM (24) did not 
play. Next: vs. Sauttwrn Mississippi Satur- 
day; ULToommo (V2) tost toNa i Rondo 
3 VO. Naxt: at Mississippi State, Saturday. 

15 Nona Carolina 04) beat TUkew 474. 
Naxt: at No.3 Florida State, Saturday; i7,Ttx- 
as 04) dfci rat play. Next: atTbns Christian. 
Saturday; u, Vlrgfata Took 04) boot Boston 
College 167. Next: vs.Wast VtrgMQ.Thmday; 
It. W os hta gla n (Ml cOd not Ptav. Next: at Ha. 5 
Mkxnl, Saturday; 25 Southern Cal (1-1) did not 
ptav. Next; vs. Baylor. Saturday. 

2LOktalmna (M) beat Texas Tech 17-11. 
Next: vs. lama State, Oct 1; 22. Brigham 
Yoon O-i) lost to Colorado State 25-21. mxt: 
vs. New Mux lea Saturday; ZXOhta State (2-1) 
beat Ptt1sburuh274. Next: vs. HoiMon, Satur- 
day; 25 WasMngtoo State 04) did not May. 
Next: at Na 13 UCLA. Saturday: IS, Hart* 
CoraUna state 04) dM not May. Next: vs. 
Western Carolina, Saturday. 

Other Major College Scores 

EAST 

Boston U. 31. Maine IS 

BueknMI 32. S. Connecticut 7 

Buffalo St. 31, Canfelus 6 

CW. Post 21, Wagner 17 

coleafe 20, Dartmouth 14 

Connecticut 36, Richmond 21 

Cornell 3L Princeton 16 

Dataware 3B, vUtanuva 31, OT 

Demesne X Georgetown, D.C. 0 

eat Carolina 31. Temple 14 

Harvard 3». Columbia 32 

Hofstru 30. FonJham 20 

Lehtofi 4B, Buffalo w 

Morist 37. Iona W 

Morytand 24. West Virginia 13 

Massochaetts 32. Holy Craso D 

Monmouth. NJ. 20. Poce 0 

Now Hampshire 27. jomoe Madloon 24 

Penn 27, Lafayette 7 

Rhode blond 27, Northeastern 20 


Robert Morris 2C Cent. Comedian St. 17 
Sacred Heart 22, St. Fronds. Pa. 13 
St Peter* n Sima 22 
Syracuse 37. Rutgers 36 
Yale 27, Brown 16 

MIDWEST 
Bawttas Green 39, Now 21 
Butler 31. Georgetown, Hv. 21 
Cent Michigan ua e. Miditam V 
Cincinnati 97. Miami, Ohio 17 
Drake 14. San Diego 9 
E. IttTnots 45. Lock Haven 10 
Illinois 34, N. Illinois 10 
IDInolS SL 17, W. Illinois 0 
Indiana St. 63. w. Virginia Tech 0 
Kansas St 27, Rice 18 
Kem 32. Akron 16 
Minnesota 40, San Diego SL 17 
Murray St. 9X 3E Missouri U 
N. Iowa 12. SW Missouri SL 7 
Purdue 49, Ball St. 21 
Toledo 47, Liberty 37 
Utah St. & Ohio U. 0 
Valparaiso v. Minkin 6 
W. Michigan 21 Iowa St 19 
Youngstown St. IX E. Kentucky 4 
SOUTHWEST 
Baylor 14. Oklahoma St 10 
Langston 3L Prairie View 10 
Missouri 16. Houston 0 
New Mexico St. 23. Texw-EI pom 22 
Sam Houston St IB. Angelo St. 7 
Southern Meth. 34. New Mexico 31 
Stephen F-Ausftn 4a ScxYaniento SI. 15 
Texas Christian 3), Kansas 21 
FAR WEST 
Boise St. 37, Nevada 27 
CS Nerlhildoe SL UC Davts 13 
Promo St 24 Oregon St. w 
Hawaii 21, CalHontta 7 
HumboMt St. 23, Cal PoirSLO 19 
Idaho 44 UNLV 38 
Loutsvilte 2& Arizona St. 22 
Montana 49, E_ Washington 29 
N. Arizona 41. Moho St. 19 
Nootrvwslern 14 Air Faroe 10 
Pacfltc 27, SW Texas St 7 
S. Utah 41. Western StXota. 26 
St. Mont's. Cal. 4S. Sonoma St. 21 
Stanford 51. San Jose St. 20 
Utah 34 Oregon 14 / 

Weber St. 41, Montana SL 13 
Wyoming 17. Tutsa 7 

SOUTH 

Alcorn at. 39. Alabama st. 7 
Appalachian St. 45, N. Carolina A4T 0 
Arkansas St. 41. S. llllnots 14 
Cent. Florida 4a BethunpCaokman 17 
E. Tennessee SL 31. VMI 21 
Evansville 35. Ky. Wesleyan 77 
Georgia 7a NE Louisiana 6 
Grombllng SI. 17, Morgan SI. 12 
indtano 39. Kenhidcy 29 
Jadcson St 35. Florida AAM 34 
Jacksonville st. 28. AkL-Blrmlnoham 12 
Marshall 34 Georgia Southern 13 
Marrvtl to, Term. 19, Dovtawn M 
McNeese St. Zl. Cant Arkansas 7 
Mississippi 2a Vanderbilt 14 
NW Louisiana 35, Nkholls St 3 
S. Carolina SL 37. Charleston Soulhem 0 
Savannah St *3. Texas Southern 14 
South Carolina 31, Louisiana Tech 4 
Southern Miss. 2 a M emp h is 3 


Southern U. 19. Mho. Valley St. 0 
TeanHMorttn K Lane 6 
Tennessee St 44 Morchaod St. 10 
Tennessee Tech 2a Samtord 7 
TO-Chattanooga 47. Garttwr-Yhhh 23 
Tewson St. 42. O cta w or e SI. 18 
Tray St. 39. SW Louisiana 20 
Virginia 9. Clemson 6 
W. Caroline <L citadel 38 
W. Kentucky 21, Austin Peoy 3 
William 4 Mary 28. Furman 26 

CFL Standings 

Eas te rn Division 

W L T PF PAPts 
Wtnnineo 7 4 0 405 355 14 

Ba Iff more 4 4 0 293 367 12 

Toronto 4 4 0 274 341 8 

Ottawa 3 7 0 292 363 6 

Hamilton 3 0 0 2S1 332 4 

Shreveport 0 11 0 187 440 0 

Western Division 

Calgary 9 2 0 439 212 18 

Brtt.Columbia 8 2 1 411 263 17 

E dmonton 8 3 0 322 245 14 

Sewkat c h e wan 4 4 0 290 278 12 

5 ocram a nta 5 5 1 368 294 11 

Las Vegas 4 7 0 328 353 I 

Friday' s Gome 
Gatoarv 3& Las Vegas 25 

S u t ei d ue ' s Oame* 

Wlnnlpee 34 Hamilton 21 
Edmonton 25. British Columbia 18 
S uLromenta 86. Shreveport 3 

- ]pr-- 

PASSIM SHOT TOURHAMBHT 
In Bordeaux. Fnuco 
Qoorterfleats 

Jett Tarongo, US. del. Gilbert Raoux. 
France. 6-4 6-3; Marc Roswt (4). Switzerland, 
dot Fatxtce Santoro, France. 6a 6-1; Guy 
forgot France. Oof. Cedric Plollne (3), 
France, 5-7. 64. M; Wayne Ferre! ra (2). 
South Africa, dot. Olivier DeLollre. (7). 
France, 6a 64. 

Tarongo def. Rnssel 6-1. 6-3; Ferreira pet. 
Fargo! 6-3. 6-7 1 67). 6-1. 

Float 

Ferreira deL Tarongo 64. 7-5. 
ROMANIAN OPEN 
to B u ch a r es t 
Steeles, Qaartarflnau 
Ataerta Costa. Spain, def. Marco Gorrtz. 
Spam. 6a 64; Fnmco Davlrc Argentina def. 
Korol Kucera Slavokta. 63, 60; Renzo Fur- 
taa Italy, del. Thomas Muster IS), Austria 
walkover; Goran Ivantsov Ic 11). Croatia del. 
Alex Corrttfa (». Spain, 34. 4-Z 6Z 
Stogies, semifliMis 

Ivanisevic def. Furtoa 64. 64; Oavln deL 
Casta. 74,6a 

Final 

Davln deL Ivanisevic. 6-2. 64. 

CLUB COLOMBIA OPBN 
(a Boson 


Mehgeri (I). Brazil. 64. 7-5; Karel Nevacefc 
(5). Czech Rep«Mc,def. Daniel Nestor, Cana- 
da. 64. 63; Miguel Taboo. Cotombta def. 
Christian Mlntusst Argent ina 6-1, 67 (3-7). 6- 
4; Mourtcto Hadod 16), ColomMa del. Sergio 
Ortas. Chffe. r-A 61. 

3dUIln\itl 

Pereira def. Novacxk,74 (12-10), 63; Hadod 
def. Totoan. 6t 67 (67). 7-5. 

Tv" " T^‘ r -; 2 

Japanese Leagues 

Central League 

w L T pet. ob 

Yemiurl 66 a d ms — 

Hlrotfilma 64 58 0 -52S 7Vx 

ChunktU 60 59 8 .504 5 

Hcnjtan M 61 0 AW 4 

Yokohama 56 63 D 471 f 

Yakult 53 43- 0 A57 10* 

Saturday's Resalts 
Yomlurt, 6. Hanshln 4 
Hiroshima 10, Yokohama t 

Seodars Rasutts 
Yomturi 5. Harahtn 1 
Yokohama 7. Hiroshima 6, 12 Iminp* 
Orunlchl & Yakult 2 

Pacific League 

W L T Pa Cl 

5otbu to 48 0 sn — 

Orix 64 54 2 .542 4 

Kintetsu 63 54 2 S3* 6 

Daiei 63 56 I S29 7 

Lotto 49 66 1 427 19 

Nippon Ham 42 73 4 -370 26 

Sat u rdays Results 
Seltxi 12. Orix 2 
Lotte S, Daiei 3 
Nippon Ham 7. Kintetsu 2 

Sunday's Results 
Setbu 3. Orix 2. 12 Innings 
Kintetsu 15 Nippon Ham 7 . : 

Daiei 20. Lottes 


British Masters 

Wool* kwdlop scores Seeder hum W7SA00 
British Masters getf toureoment an (be par- 
72. u a lied Duke's cour s e at the Woburn 
Sou and Country Club: 

Itxi Woman, Wales 71-704347—271 

Sovc Ballesteros Spain 69454672—275 
Bernhand Longer, Germany 71494671 — 276 
CoHn Montgo m o ri o. Sarttand 72467046—276 
Jose Rivera, Spain 74474846-277 

Ernie Ed. South Africa 6671-7046-277 
EogtKxi (ycowwiu Ireland 714949-70—27* 
Philip watton, Ireland 667672-66-271 
Miguel Angef Mania Spain 714945-73-278 
Sam Torrance. Scotland 76784671—27* 
Merlin Gatos. England 67-7672-70-779 
Andrew Murray. England 6749-72-71— Z7* 


w 

L 

T 

PCL 

GB 

70 

48 

0 

-573 

— 

64 

54 

2 

■542 

6 

63 

54 

2 

538 

6 

63 

56 

1 

.529 

7 

49 

66 

1 

A27 

19 

42 

73 

4 

J70 

26 


Presidents Cup 


Nlcntas Pereira. Venezuela def. Fern a ndo 


Ronito Saturday of second-day play lo the 
Inaugural Pre si de n t* Cep Mutches on toe 


par-72 Robert Trent Jones eo« 


Fulton Altem, South Africa and Mark 
McNulty, Zi m bab we , dot. Jim GoJtaBhnr and 
Jafei Huslua us* 4 and 3; Crata Parry and 
Bradley Hushes. Australia deL Loren Rob- 
erts and Tom Lehman, Ui- 4 and 3; Tsukasa 
W a ta nafa a Japan, and Vllay Slngtv FHL del. 
Jay Haas and Scott Hoch, Ui, 3 and 1 : Davb 
Love til and Fred Couples. Ua.def. Frank 
Nobllo. New ZoatamL and Robert Altonbv, 
Australia, 2 -up; Nkfc Price. Zimbabim. atd 
Sieve Elklnaton. Australia hatred with Phil 
Mkketson and Corev Pavla Ui 
score: l e t er eo tl oeol TO. Uefted States lVi 
Fours o mes 

David Frost, South Alricaand Peter Senior, 
AwstrolladefectodHato Inrin and Hooa UA, 

6 ond 5; Love and Gallagher, U.S. defeated 
NobUa New Zealand, and Allenbv. Australia 

7 and 5; Stogh. Fill, and Elktogtaa Australia 
d efeated Jeff Atoggert ond Huston, U.S. 3 ond 
2; Roberts and Pavla U-S-. defeated Parrv, 
Australia, ceid AUem. South Africa 1-up; 
Mlckotsan and Lehman, uA. defeated 
Huohes. Austral la ond McNulty. Zimbabwe.3 
and Z 

Score; UnlMd States 3. let u not ton al 2 
Total score: United States TL intareart ■ 
FRIDAY'S RESULTS 
Foor-beR 

Joy Ham and Scott HoctuUnlted States, def. 
Fid ton Allem and Dovkt Frost. South Africa A 
and 5; Coney Pavtn ond Jett MoBBe rt . United 
States, def. Steve Eiktogtoa Australia and 
Vllav Singh. Fill, 2 and 1: John Huston and 
Jim Gallagher. United Stafea def. Craig Par- 
ry md Robert Allen by, Australia 4 and 2: 
Tom Lehman ana Ptill Mlckchcm. United 
States, def. Frank Nobllo. New Zeofand, ond 
Peter Senior. Australia. 3 and 2; Davts Lore 
111 and Fred Couples. United Stoles. deL Nick 
Price. Zimbabwe, ond Bradley Hughes. Aus- 
tralia. 3 -UP, 

Score: United Stoles 6 International 0 
Foursomes 

Hocti and Haas. ua. de f eated Parry. Aus- 
Irailaand Tsukasa Watanobg.Japan.4 and 3; 
Hole lrwtn and Laron Roberts, US- defeated 
Frail and Allem. both South Africa. 3 and 1; 
Ncolto. New Zeoland. and Allenbr. Australia. 
detealM Pavln ond Mnogert. U.5, 2 and 1; 
Elklngtoa Austral laand Singh, FKLdefeated 
Mlckelson ond Lohmaa U3. 2 and I; Lave 
and Gallagher, U5. halved wtth Price and 
McNulty, both Zimbabwe. 

Scare: United States 7*. lateraottoeof 210 


Rowing Championships 

nnuts. Women 

Uflhtwigtrt dooms scslb— i.Conoda (Col- 
leen Miller ond Wendy Wletw), 6 minutes. 
5485 seconds. 2, Chino (Alfang Zhang and 
Shaovon Ou). 4:5553. X United States (Lind- 
say Burns and Teresa Zarzsczny). 6:577*. 4. 
France (Benedicta mxuv and Christelle Fer- 
nandez). 6:S65P.Xiialv (Erika Bel loand Mar- 
tina Orion), 7 :014). 6 Denmarii (Motto Bloch 
Jansen and Anna Helleborg), 7:0474. 


Pairs— 1. Francs (Christine Gone and He- 
len* Corttn), 7:0177. Z Romania (luilo Bo- 
bsl ca <md EllrobethaLlpa),7.-0SL45X Austra- 
lia (Anno Ozollns and Carnwn Kkxiw), 
7:0748. 4. Germany (Blrig Sledi and Gabriolo 
MOM), 7:09J&£ Britain (Joanne Ttrrvcr and 
Miriam Batten). 7:1176 6, United States 
I Utatno Bennian and Morv McCagg), 7:1776 
Mm 

Pairs — 1, Britain (Stovon Redgrave and 
MotthewPinstnt),6:1845.XGentK>ny (Peter 
Hoottzenbrtn and Thom on Strappgtaaffl, 
6: 1975. X Australia (Robert Wat ker and Rlch- 
antWoame).6:2075L 4. Canada (Phil Graham 
and Darren Barber), 6:21.42. 5 Crooito 
(Morka Bangvlc and Ntnoslav Saraga), 
4:2459.6, Belgium (Jaofr Van Drtessche and 
Luc Gafrls). 6:3552. 

LfgMweigW double ttura—l. Italy 
(France s c o Esposito and MkheMmasio Crl- 
spl]. 4:18.10. X New Zeafwid (Robbie Hamin 
.ad Michael Rodger)# 6:20.14. X Swltictiond 
(Michael Gler and Markus Gler). 6:30 l 85 4. 
Spain (Jase Maria DeMarosand Juan Carlos 
Suez), 6:2250. 3, Ge r many (Bloern Spaetsr 
and Nikolaus Houtsrii). 6:2452 &, Britain 
(Stuart WMtstawand Andrew Slntan), 6: 2661. 

Uo b two Hh t seedrenle scntls— 1, Austria, 
5:4675 X Italy, 5:48BX X Portugal, 5:4944. 4. 
Germany. S:49JI. 5 Australia, 5:5155 5 
Fnmce. 5:5374. 

UgMwetSht etgWv-1, Britain. 5:3158. X 
Denmark. 5:3175 X Italy. S:34iX A Nether- 
lands. 5:3549. 5 United Slates. 5:40.97. 6 Ja- 
pan. 5:4179. 

.- .lu“- f.. 

SINSBR WORLD SERIES CUP 
Finals 

Saturday# In Csto mb e 
Indio Innings: 99-4 
Sri Lanka tonkins: 969 
Result: Indta wan by six wickets 

•- * ••• :-u.- V - . •' >V.' - 

r : .- 

WORLD CUP QUALIFIER 
Wales 15 Romania f 

FRENCH FIRST DIVISION 
Bastla 1, Montpellier 1 
Metz X Nice 0 
Lens 1, Lo Hovro 1 
Sachaux 1, Bordeaux 4 
Strasbourg I. Cam 0 
Nantes X Saim-Etienne 0 
Monaco a Rennes 0 
Cannes 0 , MatHgtma 1 
Lean X Parts St. Germain 0 

Sta ndtaet : Nantes 21, Lvan 19. Lons 15 
Cannes 15 Salnt-Eftmne 15 Strasbourg 15 
Mortfgues 15 Bordeaux 15 Paris St. Germain 
K Rennes U Nice IX Bastla 11. Auxerro 15 
Sodtoux 1 X Lo Havre 5 Monaco 6 U lie & Metz 
5 Montpellier 5 Coon X 

DUTCH PIRST DIVISION 
Vitesse Arnhom 1. Redo JC Korkrado 1 
RKC woolwjik X Sparta Rotterdam 2 
PC Twente Enschede X Go Ahead Eagles 


On rente r 0 

Votendam 1. It c o nn re on 2 
Utrecht X Groningen 1 
MW Maastricht X Willem II TUbura 0 
psv Eindhoven 5 Dordrecht » 0 
Foreno on ) Rotterdam vs. NEC Wlmegen. 

Ita n dlu e i: Utrecht 5 PSV Eindhoven 5 
Tweato Enschede 5 AJax Amsterdam 6 MW 
Maast ri cht 5 Peysnoord R ot t e n d om 5 RKC 
WaaMlk 5 Heerenvcen 5 vwendom X NEC 
Nameem & Redo JC Kerkrade X N AC Breda 
X Groningen 2. Willem 11 THburgl Dordrecht 
98 Z Vitesse Arnhem X Soarta Rotterdam 1, 
Go Ahead eagle* Deventer L 

GERMAN FIRST DIVISION 
VIB Stuttgart 5 Elntramf Frankfurt 1 
Dynamo Dresden 5 MSV Duisburg 2 
Bayern Munich 1# Hamburg SV 1 
Sdnllcc X FC Coiagns 1 
Bayer Herd In gen 1, FC Kaleersiaulern 3 
Boyar Leverkusen X Bannsia Dortmund 2 
Wonder Bremen 1, Borusslo Mgmton. 0 
Knrtsruhc EC X I860 Munich ) 

VTL Bochum 1, SC Frwlbure 3 

Standhigs: Werder Bremen 9. Borusslo 
Dortmund 7. Karlsruhe SC 7. VtB Stuttgart 7, 
Bayern Munich 7, FC Koberstoufern 7, SC 
Freiburg 5 SchaHte 5 Hamburg SV 5 Bayer 
Leverkusen 5 Mocnc h e ngl odbotri 4, Eln- 
I r ad i t Frankfurt 5 FC Cotanne 5 Dynamo 
Dresden X Uerdtogen X VH. Bechum X MSV 
Duisburg X I860 Munich 1. 

ITALIAN FIRST DIVISION 
Bari 1. Realm 0 
Bresdg a I n tsraaztonoie at MDon D 
Ronmhno x Cr om o n e e e l 
AC Milan X Lazio of Rama 1 
Parma Z Cagliari 1 
AS Rama X Genoa 0 
S om pdorio of Genoa 1, Foggia 1 
Torino X Padova a 

S ta ndi ng* : Parma 9. Sompdorio 7. Roma 7, 
Ftargnttoa7,Mllan7, Lazio 5 Fogata& Juven- 
Ius4> Inter 5 NoeoH X Grwnonese X Sari Z 
Torino X Bresda X Cagliari L Genoa L Res- 
alano X Padova 5 

ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE 
Arsenal Z Newcasfi* 3 _ 

Chetsoa 1. Block bum 2 

Coventry 2 Loads 1 

Crystal Palace 5 wimbtedon O ' 

Evorton X Oueens Pork Rangers 2 

Leicester X Tottonhom l 

Manche s ter United X Liverpool 0 

Staff told Wednesday V Manchester City J 

Southampton 1, Nottingham Forest 1 

West Ham I. Aston Villa 0 

ll a d d kiii : Newc as tl e lXBtadtaumKNol- 
t Ingham Forest KMonctastor United IX Liv- 
erpool 15 Leads 15 Oieisea 9, Aslan Villa 9, 
Tottenham 9. Moncftsstor 5 Narwfeft 5 
Queens Park Rongers 5 Wknbtofloo 5 South- 
ampton 5 Arsenal 5 Sheffield Wednesday 5 
West Ham 5 Coventry 5 (PMdch 5 Leicester 
5 Crystal Pataoe 5 Evortan X 

SPANISH FIRST DIVISION 
Atfettco Modrtd X Real Sociadad 1 
Real Zarcwazo X Oviedo 1 
Compostela 1. VOHodoOd 0 
Racing do Santander i, Departtvo do Lo Coru- 
na 2 

Sporting do GDon 5 Ceita do Vino 0 


Athletic Bilbao 1# Real Bette 0 - - 

Atoocefe I. Real Madrid 1 
Sevilla L Lograaes 0 : 

Espanol 5 Barcelona 0 
Valencia X Tenerife ) 

Sfondkre*: Deperti vo lo Coruna 5 EspomI 
5 Real Madrid 5 Zaragoza 5 Valencia 5 Sevi- 
lla 4, Batts x Tenerife X Barcelona x Snorting 
do Gllon X Ceita X Compostela X Afhtotic do 
BUbao X Roai Soctodad x amHcb do Madrid 
ZAlbaeetaXRednade Santander 1, Oviedo 1, 
Lognxtes 1. Vaikxtaiid 1. 


BASEBALL 
American League 

BOSTON— Announced 2-rear working 
aoreement with Trenton. Ei- 

- Hatteoal League 

FLORIDA— Signed Ay ear working agroo- 
ment wtm Owrtotto. IL. Fired Vado Plman. 
Hret base coach; Frank Rebergor. piKMng 
coach; and 8ab McClure, bullpen coach. Re- 

totrwd Cookie Rotas, third base coach. Nonwd 
Rusty Kurtz first base and outfleM coach and 
Jot B re e d en coach. 

PITTSBURGH— Stoned a.6yoar working 
agreement wfth Lynchburg, Carolina League. 

SAN DIEGO— Stanad a 6yeor working 
agreement with Las Vega* PCL. • 
BASKETBALL - 
Nat tonal BoskatbaR AMo ogH on 

CHICAGO— Signed Ron Hamr.guard.ta5 
year contract. „ 

DALLAS— Stanad Tony Dumas, guard, to 4-_ 
year controcL 

PHOENIX— Stanad woymon Tlidafe. tor- 
wend. to l-veorcentraa. Rece i ved taogueop- 
proval on tarworil Danny Manning* Irwsr 
cunt rad 

UTAH — Traded TYrano Corttrr, fgrwwdi 
and 1995 sacandaaund draft Ph* talheAltan- 
fo tor Adam Keefe, forward. . 

. . _ . football'. . _ .. 

NMiaaed Footwril Lomwe -, 

CINCINNATI — Ualcned Adrian 'Hardy, 
c u merho Ck . and Artie Smlltadelenslva end, 
off waivers from San Francisco. WnhredMor- 
ceOo Simmons and Porey Dudett, defenslvg 
bods. J ' ' 

GREEN BAY— Waived Alai Katahfcvatu, 
guard. Stanad charts* Hooe. word. - 

N.Y. JETS— waived Kenny Stadd. wide re- 
ceiver. Stand Tutneau AlFpato, fbwtmkcr. 
• (ram practice nuad. 

WASHINGTON— Aotvaled Setwttaa Sore 
age, defensive Dad. from prarttcesmiad. Re- 
leased LcsRe Baanfwd; wide receiver. • . 

HOCKEY 

NgHanel Hockey LsPkie 

ANAHEIM MIGHTY DUOC5-Asstamd 
John Tanner, goaNenderi Mari' F enter, Ja- 
son Marshall ond Scotf awmer,.deferae- 
mon; Dean E wen ond Maxim Bats, left Wtoos; 
Scott McKay, Brian Sullivan aid Crata Ref- 
Cherf, right wtogs; md Jean-Froaaato 
Jompht. center, to Son Diego, IHL. 

BUFFALO— Signed put LoFontatoe, eon- 
tar, to 6veor contract extmtan. 

CHICAGO— Retarned Eric LeComote, left 
wing, to Hull, Quebec Malor Junior Hockey 
Leooue- 


DENNIS THE MENACE PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 



JUBMKAfdCUl CARGO 9EWTB1 ANB8U 


invesfment 

information 

Read 

the MONEY REPORT 
every Sahjrdoy 
in the IHT 























\ 


O N DAY 

SPORTS 


'iiinii""' v T Tiiiiiiiiiii trr 


Dolphins’ Kirby Rushes Past Jets, 28-14 


77m- •Ixrt'aaretf 1 Pros 


Interceptions, ingenuity 

> Miami Dolphins dom- 


and Terry 

Kirby helped the i 
inate the New York Jets on Sunday in a 
National Football League game in Mi- 
ami. 

Kirby rushed for 100 yards, an injury- 
plagued defense intercepted four passes 
and Keith Jackson improvised a lateral 
for a touchdown as unbeaten Miami 
handed New York its first loss, 28-14. 

Miami (3-0; took sole possession of 
first place in the American Football 
Conference East. New York fell to 2-1. 

Dan Marino completed 23 of 31 for 
289 yards and two scores. Jackson had 
his first 100-yard game in three seasons 
with Miami. 

Hie Dolphins celebrated the NFL’s 
Throwbacks Weekend by wearing uni- 
forms from their 1972 perfect season, 
and at times, Miami looked lilce that 
mn-oriented team. Kirby, a second-year 
pro, carried 15 times for his first 1 00- 
yard game, helping Miami keep the ball 
away from the Jets and wearing down 
their defense on a hot, sunny day. 

Jackson caught six passes for 100 
yards and contributed the most memo- 


straight victory over the Oilers, who 
have started the season 0-3 for the first 
time since 1984. 

Smith battered quarterback Bucky 
Richardson all afternoon and delivered 
ajolting blind-side sack late in the third 
quarter that killed an Oiler drive at the 
Bills’ 27. Smith’s sacks resulted in 28 
yards in losses. It was his second four- 
sack performance; the other was against 
Indianapolis in 1990. 

Eagles 13, Packers 7: While Reggie 
White watched from the Green Bay 
sideline in his return to Philadelphia, the 
Eagles defense chalked up six sacks, two 

NFL ROUNDUP 

interceptions and a forced fumble. Bill 
Romanowski, W illiam Fuller and Burt 
Grossman, three veterans brought in to 
replace departed free agents White, 
Clyde Simmons and Seth Joyner, keyed 
a defensive effort that kept the Packers 
fI-2) off the board for the final three 
quarters. 

The Eagles (2-1) scored on two 26- 
yard field goals from Eddie Murrav and 


Chicago (1-2) had trouble bringing 
down Allen and containing Carter. Car- 
ter had eight catches for 79 yards in the 
fust half, when the Vikings took a 10-0 
lead. Alien, who had two touchdown 
runs, gained 159 yards on 22 carries. 

Moon completed 22 of 29 passes for 
236 yards as the Vikings offense, which 
had only one touchdown entering the 
game, got untracked. 

Saints 9, Bocs 7: In Tampa, Florida, 
Morten Andersen kicked three first-half 
field goals and the New Orleans defense, 
which yielded 68 points in the first two 
weeks of the season, made them good. 

The triumph enabled the Saints (1-2) 
to avoid their worst start in 14 years, 
while denying Tampa Bay (1-2) — 
which missed a 54-vard field goal as 
time expired — what would have been 
its most promising start under Coach 
Sam Wycbe. 

Andersen kicked field goals of 43 and 
31 yards in the first quarter and Jim 
Everett threw 31 yards to Wesley' Walls 
to set up another 43-yard kick just be- 
fore the half for a 9-7 lead. 

Browns 32, Cardinals 0: In Cleveland. 


_ - _ *°*> Brolwdc/Ttoc Associated Pres, 

Notre Dame’s Ron Powins under heavy pressure from die Michigan State defense. 


The Dolphins defense, depleted by 
injuries at linebacker and cornerback, 
nonetheless frustrated New York and 
quarterback Boomer Esiason. who 
threw all four interceptions. 

Bais 15, Oilers 7: In Houston, Buffa- 
lo’s Jim Kelly and Andre Reed played a 
game of catch to set up five field goals 
by Steve Christie, and Bruce Smith 
squashed Houston's offense with four 
sacks. The Bills (2-1) got their third 


game in Philadelphia since signing a S17 
million contract with the Packers before 
last season. 

Vikings 42, Bears 14: In Chicago. 
Minnesota celebrated tbe past by deliv- 
ering an old-fashioned beating, the Vi- 
kings overwhelmed the Bears with basic 
football that included the passing of 
Warren Moon, the r unnin g of Teny 
Allen, the receiving of Cris Carter and 
an 81 -yard interception return by 
DeWayne Washington. 


land’s Bill Belichick. It was the first time 
Ryan was blanked in his six seasons as a 
bead coach, including five at Philadel- 
phia. 

.Arizona (0-3), uninspired by Ryan’s 
decision to start Jim McMahon at quar- 
terback in place of Steve Beuerlein. was 
shut out for the first time since 1991. 
The Browns (2-1) got their first shutout 
at Cleveland Stadium since 1983 and 
their first on any field since 1991. 

Vinny Testaverde. stung by six inter- 


ceptions in his previous two games, ran 
for a touchdown and passed for two 
more, including an 81 -yard catch-and- 
nra by rookie Derrick Alexander in the 
fourth quarter. 

Patriots 31, Bengals 28: In Cincinnati. 
Drew Bledsoe's perfect 34-yard touch- 
down pass lo Michael Timpson over- 
came more misadventures by a hold- 
your-breath pass defense. 

Bledsoe had his fourth straight 300- 
yard game in an offense that has become 
decidedly un-Bill ParceUs and is throwing 
nearly every down. The second-year 
quarterback completed 30 of 50 for 565 
yards, setting his recovers up for another 
round of big numbers. 

Timpson and Ben Coates each went for 
more than 100 yards receiving for the 
second straight week by making big play 
after big play. 

The Patriots (1-2) needed the high- 
powered passing and seven sacks by the 
defensive front to overcome a third 
straight woeful showing by the second- 
ary. Cincinnati (0-3) scored three times 
because of breakdowns in the second- 
ary. 

Steelcrs 31, Colts 21: In Pittsburgh. 
Barry Foster ran for 179 yards and a 
touchdown in his biggest game in more' 
than two years to upstage Marshall 
Faulk. 

Bara Moms, Foster's rookie backup, 
scored once and turned a routine screen 
pass into a 49-yard gain ahead of Neil 
O'Donnell's go-ahead 8-yard touch- 
down pass to John L. Williams. 

Ronald Humphrey returned the open- 
ing kickoff 95 yards and Quentin Cor- 
yatt returned O'Donnell's fumble 78 
yards to make it 14-0 in the second 
quarter. 




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By Malcolm Moran 

New York Tima Service 

LINCOLN. Nebraska — If 
the Nebraska Comimskers can 
continue to play as remarkably 
as they have, the keeper of the 
Heisman Trophy might have to 
find an innovative way to reward 
greatness this season: Just give it 
to the Huskers* offensive line, and 
let each member keep a limb. 

Nebraska’s 49-21 victoiy 
over UCLA on Saturday, its 
third of a convincing early 
stretch of the college football 
season, saw the Huskers, 
ranked No. 2 by The Associat- 
ed Press, gain 484 of their 555 
yards cm the ground, an average 
of 7.4 yards per rush. Their 
touchdowns .were -produced by 
seven players. 

Lawrence Phillips, the sopho- 
more I-back, who ran for a ca- 
reer-high 178 yards, was one of 
tbe seven. 

Brendan Holbein, a sopho- 
more split end who was struck 
by a stray ballet last weekend, 
played with extra padding to 
protect a 10-stitch wound, start- 
ed for tbe first time and ca ug ht 
a 9-yard shovel pass from quar- 
terback Tommie Frazier. 

And Frazier, whose statisti- 
cal production was beneath las 
standard — 29 rushing yards 
and 59 on 5 of 11 passes — 
directed the Husker offense 
with such skill that he inspired 
this assessment from UCLA 
coach Terry Donahue : 

“He’s the type of player that 
makes our whole football team 
totally different He’s a Michael 
^Jordan-type player that just 
makes such a difference in a 
game.” 

Tbe No. 13 Bruins, with 2 
victories and 1 loss, played 
without several injured regu- 
lars, including J J. Stokes, their 
outstanding receiver. 

Nebraska’s overwhelming 
niching game may not seem like 


such a necessity on days like 
Saturday, when Memorial Sta- 
dium was covered in warm, 
cloudless sunshine and the 
thousands in bright red could 
dress in short sleeves. 

But the Huskers are built for 
decisive moments in the No- 
vember cold, and their power- 
ful line, which created a 446- 
yard rushing average in its 
victories against the over- 

CCHLI^GE HIGHIiGHTS 

matched West Virginia and 
Texas Tech, quickly became an 
important factor again. 

With Frazier making tbe deci- 
sions, the tine taking advantage 
of an average weight advantage 
of 23 pounds (10 kilograms), and -touchdown, 
wide receivers adding important As for the 1 8tfa-ranked Virgin- 
btodcs to Nebraska’s precisian, ia Tech, its only touchdown 
Phillips surpassed his career high against Boston College came on 

i- Toman 


With four interceptions, Ron 
Powlus was almost as off-target 
as Howard — I0-of-30 for 161 
yards — but the Notre Dame 
quarterback still led two sec- 
ond-half scoring drives that ral- 
lied tbe eighth-ranked Irish past 
Michigan State; 21-20. 

“I made some wrong reads, 
some stupid plays I shouldn't 
have done.” Powlus said. 44 J tried 
to force a couple things. I should 
have taken what they gave me. 
But it turned out O.K.” 

A few other teams weren’t so 
fortunate: 

BYU’s John Walsh had four 


No. 3 Florida State 56, Wake 
Forest 14: In Winston-Salem. 
North Carolina, linebacker 
Derrick Brooks, returning from 
a two-game suspension, caused 
a fumble and blocked a punt for 
the Seminoles. 

Brooks, suspended for taking 
part in a sporting goods shop- 
ping spree with a sports agent, 
didn’t start the game. FSU’s 
Danny Kannell hit 10 receivers 
in the first half, completing 18- 
of-24 for 177 yards, and Wake 
Forest traded. 42-0. at halftime. 


No. 6 Penn State 61, Iowa 21: 
passes picked off by Colorado In State College, Pennsylvania, 
State in the Rams’ 28-21 upset backup tailback Mike' Archie 


upset 

of the 22d-ranked Cougars. 
Greg Myers had two of the ra- 
tions, returning one for a 


in yardage for the second con 
secutive game. The Huskers 
gained 234 of their 284 first-half 
yards on the grotmd and scared 
on four consecutive possessions 
for a 28-7 lead. 

■ Elsewhere, The Associated 
Press reported: 

A bad day for quarterbacks 

— and their intended receivers 

— meant a good day for the 
defenses of Auburn, Colorado 
State and Virginia Tech and a 
narrow escape for Notre Dame. 

In the most spectacular ex- 
ample of pass after pass going 
awry, LSlTs Jamie Howard 
threw six interceptions, three of 
which were returned for TDs in 
the fourth quarter of 11th- 
ranked Auburn’s stunning 30- 
26 victory. 

Hie victoiy was courtesy of 
LSlTs stubborn and seemingly 
inexplicable refusal to stop 
throwing the ball in the fourth 
quarter, even with a 23-9 lead. 


Oman Gray’s 66-yard intercep- 
tion return, one of four pickoffs 
by tbe Hofcies in a 12-7 victory. 

Auburn’s defense not only 
scored all four of the Tigers’ 
touchdowns, it also stretched 
the longest winning streak to 14 
games. 

■ Even after Auburn went ahead 
on Brian Robinson’s 41-yard in- 
terception return with 1:55 to 
play. Howard still found time to 
throw two more interceptions. 

No. 1 Florida 31, No. 15 Ten- 
nessee 0: In Knoxville, Tennes- 
see, the Gators didn’t equal 
their previous two 70-poim per- 
formances, but Terry Dean still 
passed for 303 yards and two 
touchdowns. 

Florida beat a ranked oppo- 
nent on ibe road for the first tune 
in eight tries since Steve Spurrier 
became coach. It was the first 
shutout in 13 years for Tennessee, 
which used three quarterbacks — 
starter Todd Helton and fresh- 
men backups Peyton Manning 
and Brazmdon Stewart. 


scored three touchdowns, and 
Penn State led 35-0 after the 
first quarter. 

Archie scored Penn Slate's 
sixth touchdown 37 seconds into 
the second quarter on a 4-yard 
ran for a 42-0 lead, and coach 
Joe Patemo pulled his starters 
soon after. Ki-Jana Carter had 
two TDs against the Hawkeyes. 





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(iinuu Niunm<' Renter. 


No. 7 Colorado 55* No. 10 “ — ' ’ . . V 

Wisconsin 17: In Boulder, Col- 
orado, Rashaan Salaam ran for 

four touchdowns and Colorado Jordi Cruyff, the son of Barcelona's coach, trying to control the ball against Espanol in a S panish first-division match 
converted four first-half inter- Espafiol dominated the injury-plagued Barcelona team but had two goads tfisallowed and tbe match ended in a 0-0 draw, 
cep lions into 17 points. Kordell 
Stewart threw two TD passes 
and accounted for 301 yards as 
Colorado won its sixth straight. 

The 55 points were the most 
Colorado has scored against a 
ranked opponent and tbe most 
allowed by Wisconsin since 1988. 


No. 12 Alabama 13, Arkansas 
6: In Fayetteville. Arkansas, 
Jay Barker connected with 
Sherman Williams on a 73-yard 
scoring play late in the third 
quarter to make it 10-6. The 
Tide capitalized on a bad punt 
to set up Michael Proctor’s 34- 
yard field goal in the fourth 
quarter that wrapped up the 
scoring. Arkansas managed 
only 267 yards of offense. 


r r 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 

1 1 mpudent 
youngster 

a Salesmen, 
briefly 


io Impudent talk 
14 Cheapskate 
is Beasts ot 
burden 
ia Baseball's 
brothers 



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JAL 

offers onward flights 
from Osaka 
to 21 destinations 
in Japan and Asia. 



japan Art** 


17 1994 film role 
(or Jim Carrey 

19 Movers' trucks 

20 More like winter 
sidewalks 

51 Singer Estetan 
23 Inge play 

2 « closet spook 
2t Nabokov novel 
as Clique 

3i Norse deity 
aa Rim maker 

Wertmuller 

34 Window 
surrounding 

3* Fiery gems 
41 Photographer's 
instruction 

44 Rod 

45 Neophyte 
4« Paradise 

<7 Wedding vow 
49 Soak (up) 
si ActorTognazzi 

52 By airmail from 
France 

by Dealer in doth 

59 ‘ Twist" 

«j England's Stilly 

82 Call to the 
phone 

89 Happy camper? 

68 Kuwaiti honcho 

69 Nile queen, tor 
short 

70 Neutral shade 

71 Doeslawnworit 

72 Bakery bite 
13 Of the eyes 

DOWN 

1 New Deal grp. 

2 Sol's 
interjection 


3 Just manage, 
with “out" 

4 Writer Ira of 
‘Sliver' 

5 Concise 
summary 

6 Old-fashioned 
learning 
method 

7 Long-distance 
commuter's 
home 

S For each 

9 Full or obstacles 
to “Stompin' at the 

11 Wake-up noise 

12 Actress Braga 

13 “Black-eyed" 
girl 

is Most hospitable 

n “Vive 1“ (old 

Parisian cry) 

23 Becomes 
tiresome 

24 Ninny 

25 Tippy 
transportation 

27 Those not 
mentioned 

so Arm art 
33 Letters before 
an alias 

35 Not outgoing 

37 Leading prefix 

38 Make sense 
so Feudal lord 

40 Man of Ihe casa 

42- — and 
kicking 

43 Bribe money 

48 Straightforward 
so Magician's 
word 



Rome’s Restaurateurs 
Beg for Less TV Soccer 

Reuters 

ROME — Restaurant owners here axe sick of televised 
soccer and have asked Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi to 
intervene to limit its effects on their trade. 

“There are now few days of the week without one or more 
matches. We are under constant attack.” wrote Giorgio Bodo- 
ni, the head of an association grouping 4,000 of the capital's 
restaurants, in a letter to the media tycoon Berlusconi. 

“Soccer keeps our clients at home. We ask you to act,” 
Bodoni said in a letter published by the daily newspaper D 
Messaggero on Saturday. “Shift at least one of the matches, 
starting with the Saturday night game, away from dinner 
time.” 

Italian soccer fans were able to watch live soccer every 
night of last week except Monday and Friday. Matches from 
the various European competitions are now spread over three 
days, from Tuesday to Thursday, and a pay-TV channel 
broadcasts Italian league games live on Saturday and Sunday. 

The World Cup star Roberto Baggio said that the growing 
number of matches shown on television was preventing fans 
from going to the stadium. 


4 Killed in Crash of Plane 
Carrying Nigerian Players 


Reuters 

TUNIS — An airplane carry- 
ing Nigeria's soccer-club cham- 
pions home from an African 
Champions' Cup match in Tu- 
nisia crashed in southern Alge- 
ria on Sunday, killing at least 
four people and injuring 24. Al- 
gerian radio reported. 

One member of the Iwuan- 

{ ranwu Nationale team, which 
osl, 3-0, to the T unis ian team. 
Esp6rance, in Saturday’s quar- 
terfinal first leg in Tonis, was 
among the dead. 

The plane, an Oriental Air- 
lines BAC-111 flying from Tu- 
nis to Lagos with 32 passengers 
and seven crew members, 
crashed while attempting an 
emergency landing at Taman- 
rasset’s airport, the radio and 
Algeria’s official APS new 
agency said. Visibility was re- 
ported to have been poor. 


• Two men imprisoned on 
suspicion of ordering the mur- 
der in July of the Colombian 
World Cup soccer player 
Andres Escobar have been or- 
dered freed. 

The murder of Escobar out- 
side a restaurant in the drug 
center of Medellin, apparently 
in revenge for his accidental 
scoring of a goal against his 
own team, which helped elimi- 
nate Colombia from the World 
Cup, outraged the soccer world 
and cast a shadow over the 
LouraamenL 

The Prosecutor-General’s 
Office said there was not 
enough evidence to hold Juan 
and Pedro David Gallon Henao 
in jail and has ordered the 
brothers released, pending pay- 
ment of 1.5 million pesos 
(51,800). 


w 


PHb by Wayna Babwt WlWm* 

© New York Times/ Edited bv Will Shore. 


Solution to Puzzle of SepL 16 


52 Vatican leaders 
83 Texas shrine 

54 Strict 

55 Declares 

56 Neighbor of 
Chad 

38 Songwriters’ 

grp. 

«i Tab's target 

64 Pie mode 

88 No longer 
chic 

66 Wire service 
87 Old-time 
gumshoe 



□BBEHUDH 

□□□asiaa 


|H|E|B|R|E|W|S 


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Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 1994 


LANGUAGE 


Letting the Usage Fit the Crime 


By William S afire 

W ASHINGTON — Watching NBCs live 
coverage of the O. J. Simpson pretrial pro- 
ceedings, I was startled to near one witness 
identify himself as having worked “for 16 years 
as a criminalist in the aty of Los Angeles." I 
asked myself: When is Tom Brokaw, with the 
vast research facilities at Ids disposal, going to 
tell us how to differentiate among a criminal, a 
criminalist, and a criminalist? 

The phone rang. It was Tom Brokaw. “You're 
the word raaven. What’s a criminalist ?” 

To the epistemologist studying the knowledge 
cf knowledge, this is called circularity. However, 
I owe Brokaw an answer because he is a faithful 
Lexicographic Irregular, Jargoneer Group. 

Crimen is the Latin word for “accusation, 
reproach"; a criminal thus began as “one ac- 
cused,” and is now “one who has been convicted 
of a crime.” 

No word is an island: John Donne wrote in 
1631 that “I have read in some of the crimina- 
lists ..." At that time, the word meant “one 
versed in c riminal law.” In 1892. The New York 
Nation reported on “the theories advanced by 
the anthropological school of criminalists 
Black's Law Dictionary also defined it as “a 
psychiatrist dealing with criminality .” 

But by 1857, criminologist had crept upon the 
scene. The suffix -ology means “study of,” and 
the new study was defined In the Oxford English 
Dictionary as “the science of crime; that part of 
anthropology which treats of crime and 
criminals.” 

When I put the question “When did criminolo- 
gist return to the old criminalistV’ to David 
Gascon, commanding officer of Los Angeles 
Police Department community information, he 
replied: “They are two separate terms. Criminol- 
ogist is somebody who studies the sociology of 
crime; a criminalist, on the other hand, is a 
technician or evidence gatherer.” 

What caused the split? The Encyclopedia of 
Crime and Justice has the answer under Crimina- 
listics : “With the expansion of scientific knowl- 
edge, the term criminalist was redefined in the 20th 
century to mean a specialist in empirical knowl- 
edge relating to crime. The earlier definition sur- 
vives ... to describe the criminal law scholar." 

Jerome Skolnick, professor of law at the Uni- 
versity of California at Berkeley, differentiates 
for us: “ Criminalists, sometimes called forensic 
scientists, apply knowledge from the natural sci- 
ences — chemistry, physics, and biology — to 
analyze such physical evidence as blood, hair, 
semen, and fiber in criminal and civil cases. 
Criminologists, by contrast, are social scientists. 
They study the causes of crime, the effects of 
measures to reduce crime, and the criminal- 
jus lice system itself.” That’s from the horse’s 
mouth; Skolnick is president of the American 
Society of Criminology. 

Relatedly, a reader noted a mistake in the 


description of evidence in the Simpson case. 
“One of the items found at the homicide scene 
was a knit cap,” declared Deputy District Attor- 
ney Marcia Clark, in writing. “Inside the cap 
black curly hairs were detected which have been 
determined to be of African-American origin.” 

Jonathan Balsam of Lawrence, New York, 
sent that in. “Quite startling,” he wrote, “that 
forensic science has advanced to the paint where 
analysis of a suspect’s hair can determine not 
only his race but also his nationality." 

That’s an example of substituting African- 
American for black without thinking. An African- 
American is a citizen of the United States who is 
a member of the black, formerly Negro, race. 
Not every black everywhere is an African-Ameri- 
can, and no hair anywhere is African-American, 
as every c riminalis t knows. 

□ 


reports a new sense of the verb to 
n ‘Til have my banker pencil it” The 


Brokaw 
pencil, as in ‘ 
new meaning differs from the traditional verb's 
“to draw or mark with a pencil,” and should not 
be confused with to pencil in, “to schedule tenta- 
tively,” as in “I'll pencil you in for a meeting with 
the secretary, but well see if he can’t do better.” 

The new jargon wtxbpencU, without in, means 
“to work out the details” or “examine closely,” 
quite different from the tentativeness of to pencil 
in. I'm speculating, but it is presumably rooted in 
the old phrase “to take a sharp pencil to if — 
that is, to cross out extraneous expenditures in a 
budget. 

It’s good to see this word for an old but 
ergonomic hand-held word processor gaining 
new popularity. As pencel, it was used by Chau- 
cer in “The Canterbury Tales” and derived from 
the Latin penicilhis, “paintbrush,” a dimin utive 
of penis in its sense of “little tafi." 

□ 

“The aim of NATO’s future expansion,” the 
Clinton administration’s National Security 
Council staff writes in its strategy statement, 
“wQl not be to draw a new line in Europe further 
east, but to expand stability, democracy," etc. 

Quoting this line in a recent polemic, I put a 
[sic] — the Latin word for “so, thus” to mean 
"error in the original” — after further. That’s 
because the word for distance is farther, and the 
word for degree or expressing a sense of “be- 
yond" is further. Furthermore, you can use 
further to mean either degree or metaphoric dis- 
tance, but you should use farther only for physi- 
cal distance. 

But a language maven has to be careful with 
his bracketed thuses because he cannot then let 
anything go by. A colleague circled “will not be 
to draw a new line” and swung the nor behind the 
be to read “will be not to draw a new line . . . 
but to expand." The Nitpickers’ League has a 
new member. 


New York Times Service 



Lifting the Veil on the Japanese Wabi-Sabi 


By Steven Brull 

International Herald Tribune 

T OKYO — When Leonard Korea 
sought a publisher for his book 
about Wabi-Sabi, the “beauty of 
things imperfect, impermanent and 
incomplete" and a fun dam ental as- 
pect of the Japanese aesthetic, he nat- 
urally approached Kodansha, the big- 
gest publisher of English-language 
books about Japan. 

But instead of finding a welcome 
for the first work ever written on the 
topic in English, he was met with 


Tastemakers 


OJ 

An occasional series 
about people for whom 
style is a way of life 


A 


suspicion and disdain: How could a 
foreigner understand a concept few 
Japanese can articulate? And why did 
the author insist on printing in black 
and white, on uncoated paper, with- 
out his name on the cover? 

Most Japanese believe Wabi-Sabi is 
something that cannot be explained: it 
is anti-rational, beyond definition, 
Zen-like. And those who claim knowl- 
edge, mainly a small group of people 
woo run lucrative nationwide schools 
teaching tea ceranony to young wom- 
en, are loathe to share their knowledge. 

Keren's book takes a sledgehammer 
to the notion of inscrutability, not only 
explaining the principles of Wabi-Sabi 
in clear language, but also extending 
than into an aesthetic system for de- 
signers, artists and others to use. In the 
end, he found another publisher. 

“There’s cultural warfare going 
on," said the 48-year-old, soft-spoken 
American. “The exotic, mystical char- 
acter of Japanese culture is a way to 
say, ‘We have this magic stuff, we're 
culturally superior.’ Yet many Japa- 
nese in creative fields are frustrated 
and find it a revelation that added 
clarity is empowerment" 

Lifting the veil on Wabi-Sabi was 
only one of many devious pleasures 
for Koren. who has spent the last 
quarter-century uying to debunk, 
provoke and arouse. 

Bom in New York but raised in 
Hollywood, he got his start after drop- 
ping out of UCLA in the late 1960s. 
He co-founded the Los Angeles Fine 
Arts Squad, a group that painted 
hyper-realistic murals in Los Angeles 
and Paris. The group’s best known 
work, “Beverly Hills Siddhartha.” 


helped shape LA's identity in the 
early 1970s. 

Korea later returned to UCLA and 
studied architecture, but chose not to 
pursue a profession he came to see as 
more craft than art. Instead, he 
worked as a photographer, taking, 
among others, photos for album cov- 
ers for A&M and MCA records. 

As a way to thank his unpaid mod- 
els, he organized a bath party for ISO 
people at an old Russian-Jewish bath 
house in Los Angeles. The models got 
in free. “It was a euphoric experi- 
ence” he recalled. “I ^1”^ that 
there are very few social situations 
where everyone doesn't know the 
rules. People came in every manner of 
dress to undress — from tuxedos to 
bathing suits." 

The experience inspi red h im in 1976 
to found and publish WET: The Mag- 
azine of Gourmet Bathing. 

“Sex was always lurking on the 
fringe of this, so we tried not to be too 
obvious," he said. “Bathing was a met- 
aphor for a sense of silliness, absurdi- 
ty plus sensuality. It was ridiculous 
and fun.” 

By 1981, the novelty was wearing 
thin; the project held interest only as a 
marketing exercise. The solution was 
closing the magazine down. “I like the 
idea of stopping institutions. It was a 
gleeful moment." 

WET, though, had made Keren 
something of a personage in Japan, 
where he was invited to appear in TV 
commercials and write columns on 
pop-cultural anthropology for Japa- 
nese magazines. Along the way he 
married a Japanese woman, Ztggie, 
and the two decided to split their time 
between both cultures, alternating be- 
tween Tokyo and San Francisco. 

Since the mid-1980s, Koren has 
written a series of books that seek to 
explain Japan to Westerners, includ- 
ing how-to guides on bathing and 
meditation in addition to a taxonomy 
of graphic design and a compendium 
of useful Japanese ideas (such as po- 
lice boxes, modular sidewalk curbs 
and toilets that allow users to wash 
their hands as water refills the storage 
tank ). The books are unusual for their 
copious use of illustrations and 
straightforward prose. 

“The visual is a big component in 
all my books,” he said. “My idea is 
that the viewer has to give a lot like 
art. I want to meet the reader halfway. 
I want to make art but I don't want to 
announce it or put it in the art context 
I’m a secret artist.” 



Leonard Koren: “The visual is a big component in all my books. 


U 


WEATHER 


POSTCARD 


Europe 


Today 


Tomorrow 




Low 

W 

High 

Low 

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Forecast for Tuesday through Thursday, as provided by Accu-Weather. Ana 



North America 

Fin* weather with sunny 
days and cool nights will 
reach (ram the Great Lakes 
lo the northern Atlantic 
Seaboard Tuesday. Rainy 
weather may break out by 
Thursday from Now York 
City to Washington, O.C. 
Vancouver through San 
Diego will be rain-free: an- 
nier than usual in the north. 


Europe 

Fast -changing, coot weather 
will reach from the Atlantic 
east to Germany and Italy. 
Showere and sunshine may 
fallow one another in quick 
succession: a cNIy wind wD 
at times gust through west- 
ern areas. Scandinavia wtO 
be eWHy and at times damp; 
Eastern Europe will be 
unsettled. 


He«v 

Snow 


Asia 

Beijing through Seoul to 
Nagoya and Tokyo will be 
breezy with sun and spotty 
showers Tuesday. It may 
rain briefly at midweek. 
Northern Japan may be 
stormy Tuesday. Shanghai 
wffl have litte rain. Sul end 
a downpour can be expected 
In Manila, Hong Kong, Sin- 
gapore end Bar^wk. 


Middle East 


Latin America 


Baku 

C*o 


Today 
High Low 
OF OF 
30/B6 2475 
33/BI 23,73 
28 /B2 IB/M 
28/70 18/08 
30 m 22/71 
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rayodh 

Legend: o-autmy. pe-partfy 
siwmow, Mca. W-Waathor. 


Today Tomorrow 

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Cam 27/80 20/08 pc 27/80 20*9 pc 

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doudy. cloudy, sh-showem. Mhundsmoims, r-raln, al-enow Itu/rtso, 

All maps, foracssta raid d/da provided by Accu Wiatlwr, Inc. ©IBM 


w Hah Low w 
OF OF 
a 31/88 23/73 ■ 

■ 32/80 20/M ■ 
• 31/88 13/39 f 
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■ 38/10018*4 « 
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Asia 


Today 


Tomorrow 



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Arcflomoa 

12/53 

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Altana 

26/79 

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Boston 

21/70 

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Chicago 

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27/90 

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Dene 

24/75 

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Houston 

32/99 

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Man 9 

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Montreal 

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32/89 

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Haw Yak 

22/71 

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38/100 25/77 

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San Fran. 

24775 

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Reconstructing the Romans’ World of Wine-Making 


By Frank J. PriaJ 

New York Times Service 

B EAUCAIRE. France — The Durand 
family has been farming and making 
wine in Provence for about 250 years. They 
are, in a word, newcomers. 

Two thousand years ago, this was the 
land of the Sixth Roman Legion. They had 
conquered Egypt, and what is now Nunes 
and its countryside, including Beaucaire, 
was a gift from the Emperor Augustus. 

The presence of those battle-hardened 
legionnaires is felt or seen everywhere in 
the area. And no more so than at the Mas 
des ToureDes, the Durand vineyards and 
farm. In the first century, this was a major 
Gallo-Roman agricultural estate. 

“There were some 340 acres [135 hect- 
ares] of vines, olive trees and wheat," said 
Hervfe Durand, who has run the family 
property since 1975. “There was a large 
villa for the owner, homes for the workers, 
bams for storing grain and housing ani- 
mals, a pottery factory capable of turning 
out 3,000 to 4,000 amphorae a day, and a 
commercial winery." 


Durand's chief concern is his 210-acre 
contemporary vineyard and its wines, most- 
ly under the Chateau des Tourdles label 
But for 15 years, since evidence of the 
Gallo-Roman estate was uncovered, he has 
spent his spare lime re-creating that winery 
and its wines. "1 was trained as an end tv- 
gist," he said, laughing. "Now I am an 
archaeological wine maker. Or a wine-mak- 
ing archaeologist.” 

Archaeologists have been working at the 
Mas des Tourelles since 1909. With Avi- 
gnon and Arles 20 miles to the northeast 
and south respectively, Beaucaire is the cen- 
ter of an area famous for its closeness to 
antiquity. Each turn of a plow may disclose 
yet another vestige of Roman times. 

“We are right on the great superhighway 
of antiquity, the Via Domitia,” Durand 
said. “Wines from here were shipped all 
over the Roman world." He shows how the 
clay jars called amphorae were bound with 
straw protection, much like Chianti bottles 
today. He has re-created, too, the racks in 
which the amphorae, with their pointed 
bottoms, were transported by wagon or 


ship, as well as the amphorae themselves in 
sizes from 5 to 1,000 liters. 

The reconstructed winery was built in 
cooperation with specialists from the Na- 
tional Center for Scientific Research, a 
government agency, and they have been 
able to determine.’ at least in theory, how 
the Romans built wineries and made wine. 

The wine maker-archaeologist acknowl- 
edged that there were problems in re-creat- 
ing the wines of antiquity. “We know noth- 
ing of the grapes they used." lie said, , 
quoting Virgil to the effect that the wines : 
of Greece and Rome were "as innumerable 
as the grains of sand in the sea.' 1 ■ 

“The Romans added plaster to wine to 1 
temper its bitterness, day to combat soft- : 
ness, lime to deacidify it, saffron to color it • 
and mushroom ashes to bleach red wine 
white,” Durand said. "They added roasted • 
date pits, egg white and pork blood. We 
don’t know what those wines tasted like.” 

The vintage currently on sale? Counting , 
from the founding of Rome, it's 2746. A 1 
very good year, Durand said. 


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